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election results 



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See Page 20 

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ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 
^57 MAIN STREET 
Antioch 



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IL (MWl 




©1992-A Schreedw PuMlcatlon 



VOL106-NO,45 



ANTIOCH, NOVEMBER 6, 1992 



ONE SECTION-56 PAGES 



500 PER COPY 




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•Editofial...M.....«M„.J0-12 

Dissatisfaction. 

fBusmess.^«.«,.U;.,.„.15-17 

Sweet business in Grayslake. 

Li(IJVUiilC«i*tt*ti*«***««*ifttMO~0u 

Frankenstein lives in Waukegan. 

*Obitimries...,..».^............36 , 

*GlassiJSed;............... .36-45 

Volleyball heats up. 



Footlights '92 begins Nov. 6 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The annual Si. Peter's Parish fund- 
raiser Foollighls, which is now in its 
11th year, is set to provide 10 rooms of 
entertainment under one roof on Nov.' 6, 
7, 13, and 14. 

This year's Footlights event will offer, 
music, dancing, singing and other great 
cnicriainmcnt, as all shows will run 
continuously as guests move from room 
to room. 

Headlining this year's event is Danny 
D's Comedy Club featuring seven top 
comedians, including Joe Conti, Harry 
Hicksicin, and the intermission music of 
the Dance Connection. 

Other rooms include: Grease goes to 




FiBld Of Dreamers 

Polltlca! signs endorsing political hopefuls adorn a Lake County cornfield. Now 
that elecllons are over, politicians in Lal<e County can get back to business. Turn 
to Pages 20 and 21 for results of county, state and national elections. — Photo 
by Gene Gabry 



Hollywood, Pictro's Little Italy and Black Jack and Diamond Jim's Casino 

Restaurant, PM&L presents, Jerry's Team and Bar. 

Lounge, the Polka Party, Antioch Palace, "We have a quality shows planned and 

Hangin' around the Ritz, It's Showtime, (Continued on Page 8) 




Election returns 



Longer than normal lines formed early at Lake County polling places as 
demonstrated in this shot taken as Antioch voters expressed their rights on 
Election Day at Antioch Lower Grade School. — Photo by Thomas Stevens. 



Antioch resident Horton 
celebrates 100th birthday 



by THOMAS STEVENS 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Antioch resident Floyd Horton, who 
has lived in Antioch for the past 42 years, 
will have the distinction of being 
Antioch's only true centennial man as he 
reaches 100 years of age on Nov. 7. 

Horton, who will be celebrating his 
special birthday on Nov. 8 at the Antioch 
VFW Hall, is still an active member with 
the Antioch American Legion despite 
losing use of his right arm after getting 
shot while serving in World War I in 
1918. 

"I just got shot," said Horton about 
what happened to his arm. "It was an 
exploding bullet that did the damage." 

However, Horton's disability never 
deterred him from remaining active in his 




community and with his fellow Legion 
men. One example of this is when Horton 
and his wife, Clare, who will be 90 by 
the end of the month, placed American 
flags on the grave sites of fallen area 
soldiers for more than 50 years on special 
veterans holidays like Memorial and 
Veteran's Day. 

"Before we stopped placing flags on 
graves a couple of years ago, We were up 
to 600 flags in seven cemelcrics that last 
year," said Horlon. "That's a lot of Hags." 

As for the future, Horlon said he will 
lake il easy for the rest of his life. "I've 
done my share." 

Horton's birthday celebration will 
occur at ihe VFW Hall on North Avenue 
in Andoch from 1 to 4 p.m. 



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Newspapers 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



SWALCO ready to accept new member 



by JOSEPH SOULAK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Approval is needed from only seven 
more municipalities before Tower Lakes 
becomes the 35lh member of the Solid 
Waste Agency of Lake County 
(SWALCO). 

This is the agency charged with find- 
ing acceptable ways to dispose of Lake 
County's garbage and refuse. 

The seven holdout members must ap- 
prove a change in the agency's bylaws in 
order for Tower Lakes to join. Round 
Lake Park became the latest member to 
give its nod. 

With the approval of the remaining 
seven, Tower Lakes could save thousands 
of dollars. 

According to original SWALCO by- 
laws of December 1991, municipalities 
became members by paying a one-time 
$5,000. Those not joining within a year 
would pay triple the $5,000 initiation fee 
plus the accrued interest 

The money is earmarked for start-up 
costs, hiring of a siaff and undertaking 



studies. '-The strict membership and 
penalty fee was made part of the bylaws to 
encourage membership," said Bill Brarron, 
interim executive director of SWALCO. 

The bylaws call for all members to 
approve changes. 

In the case of Tower Lakes, the cost 
would have meant a payment of $18,880. 
The village of 1,500 with a low lax rate 
said this was unaffordable. But it still 
wanted to join. 

With lobbying by Barron, 27 members 
have been convinced to change the penalty 
portion of the bylaws. 

Under the new formula Tower Lakes 
will join by paying the iniUal $5,000 fee 
plus accrued interest on that amount or a 
total of $5,553. 

Interest in becoming a member was 
prompted by a letter sent earlier this year 
to 15 municipalities not members of 
SWALCO. This was done at the direction 
of County Board Chairman Robert Dcpke, 
who wanted to have all communities in 
the new agency. 

Only Tower Lakes responded. Other 



villages such as Wheeling, Buffalo Grove, 
Barrington and Old Mill Creek arc mem- 
bers of other agencies. SWALCO mem- 
bership currently includes 95 percent of 
Lake County communities. 

Barron said it was unlikely other non- 
members will join. Thus, it is unlikely 
the same financial exception will be made. 

In addition to membership fees, 
SWALCO has $3.5 million from accumu- 



lated dumping fees at the. ARF landfill 
near Grayslakc and the BFI landfill near 
Zion. The money was tied up in court ac- 
tion by the landfill operators until late last 
year. This money is being used to imple- 
ment a planfor waste disposal. 

Still to be decided is if this should be 
by incineration or landfilling. 

' Once full-scale operations begin, 
SWALCO will receive revenue from its 
own tipping fees. 



Hunt for new director begins 



Search for a new director of SWALCO 
is in high gear with the sudden resigna- 
tion last month of former Executive 
Director Donald L. FindcU after only six 
months on the job. He returned to Florida 
to take care of his ailing mother. 

FindcU, who was paid $75,000 annu- 
ally, was selected from among 77 candi- 
dates responding to a nationwide search. 

Contacted will be eight of the lop 
candidates who are still available. Two 
were original finalists. The PAR Group 
of Lake Bluff helped in the original search 



and will continue to advise the board in 
finding a new successor. 

When fully functional by 1995 the 
agency will have and estimated $900-mil- 
lion waste disposal plan. 

Still to be resolved is if Lake 
County's growing waste pile should be 
handled through incineration or landfilling 
in conjunction with mandatory recycling. 

It was thought Findell leaned toward in- 
cineration, but he' was not on the job long 
enough to determine his philosophy. 




Ink and Talk 



Senator Paul Simon and Eighth Congressional District Representative 
candidate Shelia Smith discuss newspapers and politics with Lakeland 
Newspapers' Publisher William H. Schroeder and typesetter Donna Binger. 
Smith lost her bid for Congress to the Rep, Phil Crane In Tuesday's 
election. — Photo by Daniel Becker 



Camarena award presented to Veiiette Biancalana 



During the Red Ribbon rally at the 
Lake County Building in Waukegan Oct 
28, the Enrique Camarena "One Person 
Can" award was given to Venette 
Biancalana. This award recognizes an 
.individual who personifies the belief that 
one person can make a difference. 
Biancalana has excelled in her 
commitment and dedication in 
encouraging healthy, drug free lifestyles 
for Lake County Youth. 

Biancalna is the Assistant Principal at 
Tripp Elementary School in Buffalo 
Grove. She began the Red Ribbon 
Campaign at Tripp when she was a 
teacher. As an administrator she has 
helped other schools in the district launch 
similar ' activities. Through her 
commitment and enthusiasm for the 
message behind the Red Ribbon 
Campaign, Biancalana has been a strong 
resource for the entire Stevenson area 
districts. She has compiled a Red Ribbon 



resource book in which she has shared 
throughout the county. 

Biancalna has not stopped her 
commitment to healthy dnig free children 
with the Red Ribbon Campaign. She also 
serves as a inuicate part of the Stevenson 
Together We Can Council. This is a 
community task force representing all 17 
communities feeding into Stevenson High 
School which looks at the problems of 
alcohol and other drug issues and helps to 
create and strengthen prevention 
programs. 

Biancalana chairs the school 
committee and is a member, of the 
Together We Can Core Council. 

Prevention Services/InTouch was 
honored to present this award to 
Biancalana. InTouch is a wellness project 
offered by a partnership between the Lake 
County Health Department, the Northern 
Illinois Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse and the College of L^e 
County. 




Venette Biancalana discusses .the purpose and meaning of Red Ribbon week 
as she accepts the Enrique Camarena Award. The award recognizes as 
individual who personifies the belief that one person can make a difference. 




Where To Worship 



North Chicago 

Church Women United Worid Community Day will be 
Friday, Nov. 6 at Mr. Sinai Baptist Church, 2401 Argonne 
Dr., North Chicago. The theme is "Discovering the Sacred 
Circle." Registration is 12:30 and program from 1 to 3 
p.m. Babysitting is available and non perishable food will 
be collected for the church pantry. 

Liberty ville 

the United Methodist Church of Liberty ville, 429 
Brainerd Ave. will be holding its Saturday evening worship 
service from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Sunday morning services are 
held at 8:45 and 11 a.m. Children's Sunday School begins 
15 minutes after the beginning of each service. A "Celebra- 
tion Time" for children, youth and adult classes begins at 
10 a.m. Youth groups meet on Sunday evenings with the 
Junior High starting at 4 p.m, and the Senior High at 6:30. 
For infonnalion call 362-2112, 



(9haii\,ofLake§ 

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH 



SUNDAY WORSHIP 

Issues That Count In 1992 

8:15 & 10:45 AM 
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM 

EVENING SERVICE 

6:00 PM 
Master Your Money 
Film Series by Ron Blue 

(708) 838-0103 or 0104 

CHURCH LOCATED AT 23201 W. GRASS LAKE UD. 




Dear Community Parish, 

To find out more on how you can 
be included in this weekly feature, or 
about our upcoming Holiday Church 
Guide, contact your Classified Ad- Visor 
today at 

(708)223-8161 
Lakeland Newspapers 



2 Uik«lctnd N«wspap«fs 



Friday, November 6, 1992 




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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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Lake 
ounty 
At A 
Glance 



Voter turnout jumps 
up to 80 percent 

LAKE COUNTY — According to the 

lastcst numbers, 80 percent of the 
registered voters in Lake County hit the 
polls. According to Lake County Clerk 
Linda Hess, this was one of the highest 
voter turnouts in history for the county. 

McCue is new Park 
village board trustee 

ROUND LAKE PARK — Jean 
McCuc, 38, of Round Lake Park is the 
village's newest trustee. She was sworn 
in last week to the remaining six-monlhs' 
term of Trustee Robert Wallcn, who re- 
signed. McCue, who served on the Zoning 
Board for the past 1-1/2 years, was asked 
by Mayor Cole Akins to fill the trustee 
scat, which has been vacant for the past 
month. Bom and raised in Round Lake 
Park, the former Jean Dielz attended St. 
Joseph's Grade School and Round Lake 
High School. 



$1,300 stolen from 
Great Lakes area 

NORTH CHICAGO-^ A gas 

station-convenience store in a Navy 
housing area at Great Lakes was robbed at 
gun-point in the early-morning hours, 
Oct. 30, as employees prepared to open 
the store. There were no injuries and 
witnesses say the robber fled on foot. 
Approximately $1,300 was taken. 

Student charged in 
MHS gang incident 

MUNDELEIN— Mundelein police 
sent a sU^ong message last weekend to 
gang members and affiliates in the village, 
"We won't let you take over our 
strcets."During a three-day operation Oct. 
29-3 1, the department spoke to more than 
25 gang members and/or associates to 
deliver the message.Only one arrest was 
made during the operation. Juan 
Rodriguez the 17-year-old former 
Mundelein High School student who was 
expelled from the school for the remainder 
of the, school year, Oct. 26, was ancslcd 
and charged with mob action. for his role 
in the Oct. 19 incident at Mundelein High 
School. 

Neighbors discuss 
boundaries, issues 

LAKE ZURICH — Representatives 
from the village boards of Kildccr and 
Lake Zurich were slated for a second 
meeting to discuss boundary and 
development issues, Nov. 4. ' "This will 
be the second meeting our representatives 
have had to discuss issues of mutual 
concerns," said Mayor James Kay of Lake 
Zurich. "The discussions arc an effort on 
the part of both villages to work together 
on issues that effect all of us." 



Criminal charges 
still questionable 

LIBERTYVILLE— InvestigaUons 
of whether or not to charge a Liberty ville 
officer with criminal charges continue 
with the States Attorney's Office. The 
Libertyville Fire and Police 
Commissioners found SgL James Gallina 
not guilty of departmental charges of 
misconduct Oct. 5. Gallina was accused 
of ordering a 16-year-old girl to disrobe 
during a routine patrol at Greentree Park 
just before. 3 a.m. Aug. 1. The girl, a 
Libertyville resident, did not claim the of- 
ficer touched her. 

Board renews 
Duffy's pact 

GRAYSLAKE— Grayslake District 
46 Supt. David Duffy is working under a 
renewed three-year conU^ct. The board of 
education approved the contract renewal 
unanimously Monday. Duffy's salary, 
with a 2.9 percent cost of living increase, 
is 588,176 annually. 

Airport deal seen 
for next summer 

ROUND LAKE PARK — 

, Officials say it will be mid to late summer 
1993 before the village gets its own air- 
port That is due to lack of federal funding 
for 95 percent of the purchase. There is no 
such money today. "By next year there 
should be more for which Round Lake 
Park could qualify," said Trustee Don 
Newby. The village is still several months 
away from a financial agreement. Ready to 
become village property is Campbell 
Airport located off Allegheny Rd. The 30- 
plus-ycar-old facility is named after its 
founder, the late Vcm Campbell. It is 
owned by a Chicago firm and being sold 
by it. 



Gurnee library 
offering tours 

GURNEE— A "behind the scenes" 
look at library operations will be offered 
to paltrons of Warren-Newport Public 
Library. A limited number of paeons will 
lour air library departments from 10 a.m. 
to noon on Thursday, Nov. 12. The 
departments include circulation, adult 
services, youth services, technical 
services, bookmobile and administration. 

Grant coach Taylor 
wages battle abroad 

FOX LAKE —^ Jim Taylor has 
taken his battle to foreign shores. Taylor, 
a teacher and coach at Grant High School 
for nearly 30 years, is undergoing a new 
form of chemotherapy under the 
supervision of a doctor in Bad Stebcn, 
Germany. Taylor has been undergoing 
therapy since his cancer was diagnosed 
two years ago. Tom Maple, a friend and 
colleague at Grant for 25 years, said 
Taylor was ready to try something new. 
Taylor may be in Germany until -the end 
of November. Teacher Diane Vide said 
he'd appreciate any correspondence from 
back home. Write: Jim Taylor, c/o Dr. 
Helmut Keller, MD.Am Reulhlein, No. 2 
D-8675, Bad Stcben, Germany. 

Hart's Woods plans 
wait on revisions 

ROUND LAKE — Plans for a new 
upscale subdivision near Hart's Woods in 
Round Lake have'bccn delayed until at 
least next spring. DiMucci Development 
Corp. of Palatine has put off presenting 
final plans to the Plan Commission until 
mid December. It was supposed to have 
them ready for last month's Plan 
Commission meeting, but could not meet 
the deadline. 



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Silk'N'Haz Bridal Salon presents,.. 
Autumn^ s Fantasy Bridal Show 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1992 
at <he OLDE STRATFORD HALL 

54 Seymour St Grayslake, Dv 

Featuring... 

Olde Straiford Hall 
Grayslake m6900 



Silk'N-Haz Bridal Saloa 

Tuxedo Rentals and Sales 

Grayslake 223^166 



Cass Fhoioj 
Grayslake 




iliy 
939 



North Star Travel 
Lindeiihursi35&3010 

KE Video Productions 
Grayslake 223-1557 

Balloon Works 
Balloon Gift Wiping 
Grayslake 1 




Maiy Kay Cosmetics 
Margarette Gueroult 
Roimd Lake 5464)312 

Calligrapliy& 
Invitations by Camie 
Wauconda 5264)891 

libertyville Rent-Alls 
LibertyviUe 362-7610 



Jandee Family Hair Care 

Grayslake 2234)727 

Gurnee 623-7820 

Llndenhuret356Mll 

Vernon Hills 680-0770 

Lewis Florist 
Grayslake 223^600 

Dance Machine H 
Waukegan.22-DANCE 



f Jewels by Park Lane Rosebuds 

MaryWicklein (Balloon Decorating) 
AnUoch 395-8622 1TO.44-ROSE4 



Tickets Are Now 

Available 
Seating Is limited 

"Many GtOs To Be Glvcii Away" 



For More Information^ Call 

Sill^N-Haz 

(708) 223-3166 



Vf^J^^"W^^^^ 



ESTATE PLANNING 

SEMINAR 



AVOID PROBATE 

This infonnative and entertaining seminar 

will show you ho'iv proper planning ean save 

time and. thousands of dollars. 

Youll learn how to: 

■ Minimize estate taxes with an 

estate plan that includes a 
LIVING TRUST 

■ Reduce estate taxes. 

■ Avoid the lengthy and expensive 

probate process. 

■ Maintain privacy and control of your estate. 

■ Avoid multiple probates if you own property in 

more than one state. 

■ Avoid guardianship or "Living Probate." 

You slioiild attend this seminar if your estate is in 
CXCC6B of $50,000, or you are married, or you have minor 
children, or you own real estate in more than 1 state. 
Speakers: 




ZVI POLSTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



ROBERT K. WECGE 

ACCOUNTANT 

Specializing in estate planning 



Tuesday, December 1, 1992 

1:00 P.M. Compliinciitar>'Luiicli 

6:00 P.M. Compliiiicntar>' Diiuicr 

Wliitney Street Rcstaiu*aiit 

Graysliilfc, Dliuois 



Far Information & Rcacrvaliona Cal' 

(708) 223-9200 

SEATING LIMITED 
RESERVATION REQUIRED 



92 



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Lakeland Newspapers 3 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



Marriage Licenses 



Carmers open house set 



I 



Lake County marriage li- 
censes from Oct. 13 
through Oct. 2 3. 

Oct. 13: Douglas 
William Fox and Lori Ann Eagler, 
North Qiicago; Michael ICcnneth 
Johnson and Karin Ann 
Lawrence, Gra^slakc; Lawrence 
Francis Locascio Jr. and Cheryl . 
Ann Monroe, Lake Villa; Kenneth 
Earl Ramsey Jr. and Pamela Ann 
Beasley, Great Lakes; Eric James 
Thelen, Lake Villa and Bonnie 
Sue Wenrich, Zion. 

Oct. 14: Scott Danford 
Hall, Hawthorn Woods and Jen- 
nifer Beth Rodgers, Prospect 
Heights; Timothy John Ward and 
Caresa Espiquc Aquino, Gumec. 

Oct. 15: Guillermo 
Gomez, Cicero and Maria 
Guadalupe Valdivia, Round Lake; 
William Marcus Ivey and Natasha 
Renee GiUey, Grayslake; Michael 
James Ribbs and Cheryl Michell 
Fay, Wildwood; Richard Bruce 
Schmidt and Cheryl Diane Sahlcr, 
Round Lake Park; John Joseph 
Wright, Antioch and Megan 
Marya Frost, Vernon liills. 

Oct. 16: Edward Joseph 
Antczak and Tara Jean Berger, 
Round Lake; Peter Christopher 
Archbold, Gurnec and Jill Marie 
Lippert, Waukegan; Jamie Scott 
Baker, Great Lakes and Angela 
Christine Neal, New Castle, Indi- 
ana; Santos Campos and Marina 
Chavez, Round Lake; Anthony 
Peter Canonaco and Laura 
Crowell, Buffalo Grove; David 
Scolt Cassidy and Kimberly Jane 
Larson, Grayslake; Edgar Clayton 
CuUum Jr. -and Alisa Michelle 
Pickens, North Chicago. 

Jeffrey Farmer and Karkcn 
Marie Peacock, Wauconda; Nor- 
man Edward Hays, Mundclein 
and Anne Marie Chester; Brian 
Rogers Hendrickson and 
Stephanie Karen Cabanban, Ver- 
non Hills; Mario Hernandez and 
Silvia Alejandro, Mundelein; 
Stephen Robert Hollsford, Aurora 
and Jeanine Marie Hume, Vernon 
Hills; Isac Jimenez, Inglcside and 
Tracy Marie Stephenson, Libcr- 
tyville; Norman Koshkarian, Bar- 
ringlon and Carol Jean Campbell, 
Waukegan; James Frederick Mar- 
shall, Gurnce and Jennifer 
Catherine Verkler, Lake Forest; 
Michael. Joseph Meagher, Burr 
Ridge and Margaret Anne Dren- 
nan, Gumce; Victor Paz, Round 
Lake Beach and Denise Kimberly 
Schroeder, Round- Lake Park; 
John George Ratajczyk Jr. and 
Tammy Lee He eke, Round Lake 
Heights; Thomas Laurence Rix 
and Tracey Lynn Lonberg, 
Grayslake. 

Brian Garrett Rulifson and 
Laura Ann Almerina Wodtke, 
North Chicago; Jorge Luis Salinas, 
Mundelein and Luz Maria Mar- 
tinez, Genoa; Brian James 
Samuelson, Great Lakes and Mar- 
lena Eugenia Esqueda, Avenal, 
Calif.; Gann Edward Sawusch and 
Tammy Christine Kleinfeldt, Lake 
Villa; Jesus Trevino and Maria 
Dell Rosario Acosta, Round Lake; 
Gilberto Valdivia and Sonia 
Venegas, Round Lake Beach; 
Joshua Brett Walker and Jennifer 
Dawn Eyster, Great Lakes; Jef- 
fery Young and Kathleen Marie 
Davis, North Chicago; James 
Raymond Zabratanski, Buffalo 
Grove and Mary Alice Peterson, 
Rolling Meadows and Edward 
Micahel Zalig, Countryside and 
Christy AnneMarie Carrazquillo, 
Mundelein. 



708-688-HELP 



The Victory 

Memorial 

Chemical 

Dependency 

Program 



If you or 
someone 
you love is 
struggling 
with an 
alcohol or 
drug 

addiction, a single phone 
call can put you in touch 
with the professional, 
confidential help you need. 
Don't wait another day — 
make the call thai can 
change your life. 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1324 North Sheridan Rd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



Oct. 19: Richard Wesley 
Catalano and Nancy Jeanne Can- 
non, Barrington; Michael John 
Cope Jr., Gages Lake and Cathy 
Raye Hall, Mundelein; Micahel 
Alan Dean, Lindenhurst and 
Frayda Marsha Ncchamkin, Lake 
Bluff; Edgar Anaclcto Domingo, 
Great Lakes and Maritcs 
Landero, Chicago; Bradley 
William Hammermeister, 
Baraboo, Wis. and Nicole Leslie 
Nerini, Lake Villa; Rodolfo 
Lopez, Round Lake. Park and 
Dianne Lee Martinez, Grayslake; 
John Jospch Moreau, Antioch and 
Sharon Teresc Joswick, Island 
Lake; Japheih Fitzroy Taylor and 
Carolyn Eyevette January, North 
Chicago and Ronald Edward 
•Weiss and Cheryl Ann Prainito, 
Round Lake Beach. 

Oct. 20: Claude Woodfin 
Hagood, Vernon Hills and Dianne 
Lynn Vales, Lake Villa; William 
Peter Kootsira, McHcnry and 
Anna Bcrnadctte Pleitt, Island 
Lake; Jose de Jesus Maldonado, 
Mundelein and Maria Guadalupe 
Ruiz, Palatine; Peter Martin Zinni 
Jr. and Iris Lynn Shalin, Hawthorn 
Woods; Martin James Anderson 
and Lynda T. Gardner, 
Mundelein. 

Oct. 21: Richard Stanley 
Boggs and Liliana Stcfania 
Mrozowky, Antioch; Scott 
Edward Braunlich, Libertyville 



and Kathy Ann Baker, Deerfield; 
Jospeh Timonihy Kranz, Gurnee 
and Deborah Lynne Smith, Crystal 
Lake; James Roy McPheetcrs, 
Great Lakes and Kelly Rae Cofer, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; 
Andrew John Muetterries and 
Marsha Lynn Beyer, Mundelein; 
Paul Wesley Roselli, Dcsplaines 
and Denise Joyce Bryant, North 
Chicago. 

Oct. 22: Malcolm Ian 
Aitken and Stacy Jcanelte 
Fitzpatrick, Lindenhurst; Robert 
William Gallinati and Carolyn 
Ann Gonka, Round Lake; Kevin 
Dean Grebner and Ann Marie Pe- 
titclair, Gurnce; John Robert 
Hofflinger and Cheryl Ann 
Winigcr, Grayslake; Bruno F. 
Shipior, Chicago and Krystayna 
Alcksandra Bruzgo, Round Lake 
Beach. 

Oct. 23: Michael . Alan 
Aakens and Suzanne Marie 
Witlen, Gurnec; Todd Sean 
Allgood and Tamara Mary 
Zaremba, Mundelein; William 
Patrick Bradley III, Minneapolis, 
Minn, and Mary Colleen Ryan, 
Libertyville; Richard George Cerk 
Jr. and Lori Lee Huff, Antioch; 
John Dennis Currie and Marlene 
Uene Stricevic, Wauconda; Mau- 
rice James Griffin and Catherine 
Leigh Durkin, Libertyville; Johnny 
Paul Miicke, Round Lake Park 
and Janet Victoria Meverden, 
Round Lake Beach. 



Cannel High School will host two 
open houses at the school located in 
Mundelein. The first will be from 1 to 3 
p.m. on Nov. 15 and the second will be 
Dec. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. The open house 
is designed to familiarize area families 
with the facilities and programs of Cannel 
High School. 



Cannel is in its 30th year with an en- 
rolhnent of 1,250 students. Ninety-nine 1 
percent of our 1992 graduates have chosen 
to continue their education. Two students 
in the class of 1993 have been selected as 
National Merit Semifinalist, and fourteen 
members of the class were selected asl 
Conmiended Students. 



I! 



Keller speaks at function 



Mid-Lake County branch of the 
American Association of University 
Women will have a dinner meeting at 
6:30 p.m. on Nov. 12 at Lamb's Country 
Inn, Libertyville. 

The speaker will be Dr. Rosemary 
Keller, professor of religion and American 
Culture at Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary in Evanston. She was the 
recipient of an AAUW fellowship grant 
while working on her doctoral 
dissertation, "Abigail Adams and the 
American Revolution: A Personal 
History." She will speak at Uie branch 
meeting on Georgia Harkness, the first 
woman theologian in the U.S. Dr. Keller 
has recently published a book about the 



life and contributions of Georgia harkness 
entided "For Such a Tune As This." 

Reservations for the buffet dinner at 
Lambs may be made by calling 367-0670 
by Nov. 8. 



Scholarships available 

The Lake County Health Improve- 
ment Association will award.SSOO to each 
of Uiree College of Lake County students 
enrolled in a health career program. Ap- 
plicants may be full- or part-time students 
who intend to practice theu- profession in 
Illinois. 
Applications are available in die CLC 
financial aid office. 




Last year, I was depressed, 
and I didn't know where to turn, 



The, kids had all moved out, my husband was 
working long hours, and 1 felt so alone. 

That's when my daughter suggested I call 
Victory Memorial Hospital's Mental Health 
Unit. At first, I resisted. After all, I had raised a 
family, worked, taken care of everything. But, 
the depression got the best of me. 

My daughter took me to Victory for an 
evaluation. The psychiatrist admitted me to their 
"therapeutic community." The atmosphere was 
clean and restfuK I felt comfortable and safe 
there, and the staff couldn't have been more 
attentive. My group therapy sessions helped me 
to take control of my life emotionally, 



spiritually and physically. Some of the friends I 
made in the group came for outpatient treatment 
only. Soon, 1 started feeling a lot stronger, and 
after a couple of weeks, 1 went home. 

I'm glad T chose Victory. I really feel like a 
new person. 



For more information about the Mental Health 
Services at Victory, call l-SOO-THE CHOICE 
(1-800-843-2464), 9am-5pm, Monday-Friday. 

— or — 

For a free, confidential consultation about the 
inpatient and outpatient programs at Victory, call the 
Mental Health Crisis Line, 708-3604082, 24 hours. 






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4 Lakeland Now«pap«rs 



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Red Ribbon Week 

Oakland Elementary School Second-graders Laura 
Bookwalter and Kelly Kampendal, of .Antioch, Oakland 
Teacher Phyllis Bauser and Danny Kenney, of Lindenhurst 



show their support for Red Ribbon Week by tying ribbons to 
a fence off of Deep Lake Road.— Photo by Thomas 
Stevens. 



ACHS names 
contest winners 

The Antioch Community High 
School Student Assistance Program 
announced the ACHS feeder school 
winners of the Red Ribbon Week Poster 
Contest sponsored by the student 
organization. 

The winners were: Antioch Upper 
Grade School: Amanda Green and Robin 
Birkenmeyer. Grass Lake School: Annn 
Slughion. Ursala Martens and Valerie 
Aronson. Emmons School: John Logan, 
Tim Diemcr Mike Pocius. Tom Nascr, 
and Sarah and Kristin Jensen. Antioch 
Lower Grade: Kathryn Hoffeldt, Ian 
Groman, Lisa Korkowski, Ryan Quist 
and Christian Hudson. Prince of Peace 
School: Valerie and Theresa, Jason 
Adams, Brian Radkey, Matt Harper, 
Brook Lcrrange, Anissa Adams and Liz 
Kocck. Lake Villa Intermediate: Larry 
Noble, Leah Wegener and Greg Durkin. 
Plcviak School: Alan and Andrea Gurske, 
Ryan Gucnihcr, Jenny Rogers, and Louise 
Irvine. 

"All of the posters were very good, 
which made it difficult for the high school 
ALPHA students to judge, said Student 
Assistance Director Cathy Cratty. 

The winning posters will be on 
display in the high school commons. 



Agency completes project 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

"One down and 56 more to go," said 
Chain O'Lakes Fox River Waterway 
Management Agency Director Dr. 
William Dam after, the completion of the 
first major dredging project in nearly two 
years. 

According to Dam, a 40 foot bog 
fioated ashore some years ago and blocked 
the entrance to the channel near West 
Lake Road subdivision in Antioch 
Township. The bog resulted in the 
channel becoming silted to a one foot 
depth, effectively closing the channel to 



boat use. 

"This is the first dredging completed 
by our agency in over a year due to a 
violation with the US Army Corps of 
Engineers," said Dam. "Since our. 
appointment of Karen Kabbcs, as 
Executive Director of the Agency, our 
lines of communications with the 
governmental agencies have opened 
dramalically." ' 

Now, with the new lines of 
communication, Dam' has ordered the 
identification of all sites, in need of 
dredging throughout the system and a 
listing of the Agency's priority sites will 
be published in two months. 




ACHS auction set for Nov. 7 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers . 
' Tn a effort to fund a fledgling student' 
program during lough economic times, 
Antioch Community High School hopes 
its Celebrity Auction on Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. 
in the cafeteria will not only provide 
adequate funding, but will give the 
community an opportunity to own a piece 
of their favorite celebrity. 



According to Student Assistance 
Program Coordinator Cathy Cratty, the 
Nov. 7 auction, which now has over 140 
items up for auction, should help replace 
a significant amount of grant money the 
program lost this school year. 

The auction is open to the public and 
will continue until all items arc 
auctioned. For more about the auction 
information, call 395-1421. 



Drug awareness seminar Nov. 18 



The St. Peter School Family Associa- 
tion will sponsor an informal program on 
drug abuse entided, "Everything you want 
to know about drugs, but are afraid to 
ask," on Nov. 18 at 7 p.m. in the St. Pe- 
ter's Social Center. This program will be 
presented by Joe Dillman, a dynamic 
speaker, with an extensive background as 
an educator, consultant and counselor in 
all areas of substance abuse. 

Dillman will address the problem of 
street drugs in our community and will 
answer questions in both an open and 
candid forum, that parents and students 



may have on this very important topic. 
This program is for everyone concerned 
with the ongoing drug problems that exist 
in our community! We strongly urge 
parents and students fifth grade and up to 
attend this shocking and educational 
program. 

Come and be informed. Admission is 
free and refreshments are provided. 
Childcare is available with activities to 
include the movie "Fern Gully," 
storytime and coloring. For additional 
informadon call 395-0722. 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Lakeland (usps 027-080) 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Ofltee ol PuWlcallon; 30 Soulh Whilnoy Sl„ Gfayslake, IL 
60030, Phono (708) 223-8161. 

Published WMkly, socond dosa postogs paid ol Gfayslok*. 
IL 60030. 

Ma}l Subscripllon Rales: M6.50 Per Year by Mall paid In ad- 
vance In UKo. Cook Kenosha nnd McHonry Counllos; else- 
where "22.00 Per Yea/ by MaJI paid In advance. 

Poslmaalen Send address chanoes to Anlloch News- 
ReportBf, 30 Soulh Whitney Stteel, P.O. Box 268. Gfays- 
\Bk9, llllnoli 60030. 

(708) 223 -8161 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News 
Grayslake Times 



Vernon HIII3 News 
Round Lake News 
Wauconda Leader 
Libertyville News 
Lindenhttrst News 



I 



Fox Lake Press North Chicago Tribune 

Gumee Press Warren-Newport Press 

M.R. SCHROEDER 

FauntlBr-1904-19S6 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Pobiisher/Pmsldent 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

GonemI Manager 
JJUDePASQUALE DANIELIL BECKER ANNILR08ERTS 

JO DAVIS SHARON ZASAWL EUZABEIHCBERT 



Help needed 

The Single With Children gro.up 
needs your help. They arc a non-profit 
group with a primary goal to bring 
single parents together for mutual 
support. The group meets on. 
Thursdays at 7 p.m. For the location 
and more information, call 395-3336: 

Free check-up 

Free blood pressure screenings arc 
offered on the first Wednesday of each 
month in the Saint Thcresc Medical 
Center Lobby, I i a.m. to 2 p.m. and 
every Friday at the Saint Thcresc Area 
Treatment Satellite, Lake Villa, from 
noon to 3 p.m. 

These screenings include free 
monitoring and recording of blood 
pressure. This program is open to the 
public. For more information, call 
"Saint Thcresc Ask-A-Nurse at 244- 
5900. 

Let's talk 

Single with Children? So are we! Let's 
talk about it. S.W.C. is a support 
group for single parents and meets 
Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the area. Come 
join us! For location, call 395-3336. 

Celebrity Auction 

The Student Assistant Program at 
Antioch Community High School 
will sponsor a Celebrity Auction on 
Nov. 7 at the school. Place your bid 
on an autographed 90210 script 
written by Arron Spelling, an Oprah 
Winfrey autographed T-shirt, a Hank 
Williams mug, Gabriclle Carter's 
90210 fan club membership, and too 
many more to mention. Help them 
help our kids stay drug free. For more 
information, call 395-1421. 

PTO Craft fair 

The Oakland Grade School PTO 
will hold its annual craft fair and bake 
sale on Nov. 21 from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Over 60 craftcrs will be present 
at the fair. For more information, call 
Leslie Church at 356-0486. 

Help Wanted 

The Village of Antioch is now 
accepting applications for future 
employment in the wastewater 
treatment area. Qualifications arc: a 
Class I Wastewater Treatment License 



and experience with industrial prc- 
ircalmcnl preferred. Applications can 
be obtained at the Village Hall, 874 
Main St. For more information, 
contact Mike Ruxlon, Supcrinicndcnt 
of Sewer and Water, at 395-1000. 

Resume class 

The Antioch District Library will be 
hosting resume development speaker 
Tom Hcinrich on Nov. 12 at 7 p.m. 
This program is designed for both 
high school students and adults. 
Admission is free and reservations can 
be made by calling the library at 395- 
0874. 

Beef Dinner 

The Salem United Methodist 
Church will be hosting a beef dinner 
on Nov. 7 from 3 to 6:30 p.m. at the 
church,. which is located on 85th St. 
west of Rte. 83. The dinner will be 
held inconjuction with a Bazaar and 
Bake Sale, which will run from 1 to 7 
p.m. Tickets will be available at the 
door. 

Antioch scramble 

The Antioch Golf Club will host a 
Turkey Shoot Scramble on Nov, 14 at 
the club. The two-person cross- 
country scramble is open to all 
players, and will have both a Gross 
and Net divisions. A S20 entry fee 
will tovcr golf, lunch and prizes. 
Enu-ics arc due at the club by Nov. 11. 

Loon Lake meeting 

The Loon Lakes Management 
Association will hold its general 
meeting and election of officers on 
Nov. 7 at the Senior Center in 
Antioch at 1 p.m. All members of 
Special Service Area 8 are encouraged 
to attend this important meeting. Call 
John Bambule at 395-4915 for more 
information. 

Stressed out? 

The Antioch Community High 
School Assistance Program is 
sponsoring Parent Awareness night on 
Nov. 17 featuring the presentation, 
"Which way to the off ramp? 
Solutions for today's stressed oiit 
parents. This special presentation will 
be delivered by Elaine Schwartz. 









Annual 'FootligMs' production opens on Nov. 6 



by LIZ SCHMEHL 

(708)395-5380 
Footlights 

Once again it is time for 
St. Peter's Annual "Foot- 
lights" production. Nov. 6 
marks the opening night for 
the eleventh . anniversary 
celebration of this gala af- 
fair. Scheduled perforaiances 
are Nov. 6, 7, 13 and 14. 
The doors open at 6 p.m. 

As in the past, parking 
will be available on the 
school grounds and at local 
parking lots with shuttle 
service available. There will 
be ten rooms of music, 
dancing, singing, great 
entertainment and food all 
under one roof and shows 
will be running con- 
tinuously all night. 

There will be a tasty 
variety of food available 
throughout the evening, 
from light snacks to full 
meals. Admission is 
restricted to adults 21 years 
of age and older and all 
proceeds go to benefit St. 
Peter parish. Advance ticket 
prices are $6 for Friday 
nights and $8 for Saturdays. 
Ticket prices will be S2 
higher if purchased at the 
door. 
Many chairs 

The Camp Crayon staff 
arrives about twenty min- 
utes before the children. 
During that time we ready 
the room for the day's activ- 
ities. This particular morn- 
ing, little Sarah Struck ar- 
rived before all the chairs 
were put into place. She 
began helping me set up the 
chairs and after we placed 
eight at each table, I stacked 
the extra, unneeded chairs 
and set them aside. 1 then 
got side tracked doing other 
jobs and welcoming some 
of the other children. A few 
minutes later, I glanced over 



to where I had stacked the 
chairs and noticed the entire 
stack was gone. 

A quick glance around 
the room quickly told me 
that litUe Sarah remained on 
the job and she had made 
room at all of the tables to 
accommodate the extras. We 
are waiting for a new table 
to arrive so on a full day we 
have three very full tables 
servicing eight little people. 
Little Sarah must believe in 
the saying "the more the 
merrier" because after she 
finished placing the extra 
chairs there were twelve at 
each table. 

I thanked her for 
helping, and realized once 
again how bright these little 
ones are. She noticed the 
extra chairs, sized up the 
situation, and quick as a 
wink dispersed them evenly 
among the tables. This time 
"Out of the minds of 
babes." 
Dist. 114 

On Nov. 3, election 
day, Lotus School con- 
ducted a bake sale to help 
raise funds for a second 
grade student at Gavin 
School who has a malig- 
nant brain tumor. The 
money earned will help to 
ease the fmancial burden the 
family has incurred through 
medical expenses. Mrs. Gal- 
linati coordinated this fund 
raiser. 

If you would like to 
make a donation to further 
assist this family in their 
time of need, call the school 
at 587-7311 .for in- 
formation. As you enter 
Forest School, notice the 
monthly recognition pic- 
tures of students-of-the 
month. The theme this 
month was "Friendly Stu- 
dents" and congratulations 
are in order for Angela 



Kowalczyk, Mike Powers, 
Sarah Miller, Renee Evans, 
Jody Cobb, Shelby Beta, 
Nina Jenkins, Chris Wet- 
tlieb and Martha Jo Passe. 
Special hunt 

As I relaxed in front of 
the television one particular 
fall evening, I noticed sev- 
eral paks of legs approach- 



Margie Ashe will be the 
guest speaker at the Nov. 
12 dinner meeting of the 
Antioch Chapter of the 
Women's Aglow Fellow- 
ship. Once again the meet- 
ing will be held at Hoffs 
Columbia Bay Restaurant 
located on Rte. 59 in Lake 
Villa. Reservations are a 



Hometown Goodies 



ing our side door. When I 
opened it I was greeted by 
about 5 or 6 young ladies 
informing me they were on 
a scavenger hunt. I asked 
who sent them out and they 
pointed to Nicole San- 
tiemmo informing me it 
was part of the planned fes- 
tivities for her birthday 
party. 

I took their list and 
supplied the empty pop can, 
bubble gum, pencil rubber 
band and safety pin. Before 
going on thek way they 
thanked me for my help and 
suggested that I not be as 
helpful to the next group, 
should they also venture my 
way. The second group 
never arrived and I was dis- 
appointed that I did not get 
the opportunity to see what 
objects were itemized on 
their list. 

I now wonder who 
received the pleasure of 
helping them and which 
group won in the end. It 
was fun supplying the 
youngsters with the needed 
objects and in doing so I 
remembered taking part in 
similar hunts when I was a 
child. However the required 
objects were slightly differ- 
ent back then — cave man 
clubs, dinosaur eggs and 
square wheels! 
Women's aglow 



miist and should be prepaid 
by Nov. 7. If you are inter- 
ested in attending this Nov. 
12 dinner meeting, contact 
Edith Gibbs at 395-8195 for 
further information. 
And 

So now it is November. 
Soon it will be time to put 
that big Tom turkey into 
the roasting pan and gather 
round to give thanks. Then 
it will only be a short time 
till Jolly Old Saint 
Nicholas comes sliding 
down the chimney. It will 
be a special Christmas in 
the Schmehl household this 
year as it is our grandbaby's 
first Christmas. 



Our little queen bee, 
Alyssa Janelle, definitely 
has a way of making a 
family gathering extra 
special. At the tune of San- 
ta's arrival she will be 10 
1/2 months old. Just old 
enough to tear open, not 
only her own presents, but 
probably everyone else's 
too. If this is the case, I 
know we will all enjoy tak- 
ing turns letting her assist 
us in opening our packages. 
After all isn't that what it's 
all about 

Happy birthday 

Did I say something 
about it bemg November. If 
so then you all know it is 
time for my monthly birth- 
day list. I would like to ex- 
tend a Happy November 
Birthday greeting to the fol- 
lowing people from Lizard 
and readers — Nicole 
Adelizzi, Celia Bennett, 
Laurie Cheterbok, Brandy 
Filips, Ed Harrison (the fire 
builder), Eric Horvath, 
Ricky Klean, Sarah Alicia 
Komperda, Elizabeth Lass, 
Cindy Marquart, Walter 
Martens Jr., Gina Parenti, 



Jim Schmehl Jr., KarenI 
Schmehl and Danny Tybor.l 
Also happy third weddingi 
anniversary to Barb and Danl 
Filips who were married| 
three years on Nov. 4. 

Prediction 

I am sitting typing this! 
particular column one weekj 
prior to the Nov. 3 presi- 
dential election so naturally I 
I do not know who thei 
winner will be. Because of I 
the entry, withdrawal and re- 1 
entry of Ross Perots I got 
caught up in the election 
coverage of this particular 
set of candidates more than I 
have in the past. I even| 
found myself watching the 
debates. 

Here is my prediction of 
who will win the election 
and by the time you read 
this column this will be old 
news. I think Governor 
Clinton will come in first 
with Ross Perot a close 
second. Of course not many 
people agree with me. I 
wonder if I was right. 
Incidentally, if you saw the 
sign in my front yard, you 
know I supported Ross 
Perot. 



'Lake County winners 
Bee-Bop to the top' 




The Discords, the five 
man singing group that 
won the 1992 Senior Divi- 
sion of the Lake County 
Fair Amateur Talent con- 
test, are working their way 
to the top! This incredibly 
talented group went on to 
secure the title of "3rd 



The Discords' members 
include Steve Newcomb, 
20; Rich Meltzer, 19 and 
Dave Deberham, 18 all 
from Antioch. George 
Roberts, 19 of Wauconda 
and the leader, Aaron 
Bemau, 19ofLindenhursL 

The members are an 



all Lake County should be 
proud of their talent and ded- 
ication." 



Athlete of the week 

Congratulations to Dan Nelson for being selected Antioch Commijnity High 
School Athlete of the week for the week ending Oct. 3. Nelson scored two 
goals and had one assist during the week, and lead the Boys' Soccer team to 
a two wins during that period. First Chicago Bank of Antioch will make a 
donation to the high school scholarship fund in Nelson's name. Pictured with 
Nelson are: Soccer Coach Charles Trout and Bob Mueller, of First Chicago. ' 






Sweepstakes Winner" (third acapella group performing 

runner up) at the Youth 50's/60's "Do-Wop" music. 

Talent International Finals Together for four years, the 

in Memphis, Tennessee on Discords have performed at 

Oct. 4. many special events includ- 

This prestigious contest ing "Scoop the Loop" in 

is the largest amateur talent Chicago, 

contest in the world and the Placing at the Youth 

traditional finale of the fa- Talent International is a def- 

mous Mid-South Fair in inite highlight of their ca- 

Memphis, Tennessee. reers. According to. John W. 

Starting with a series of Lynn, the director of the 
preliminary competitions Lake County Fan" Amateur 
across the U.S. and Canada, Talent program, "the guys 
over 18,000 acts are reduced were absolutely sensational, 
to 16 acts for the Memphis " "The quality of the 
final competition. The pur- competition was absolutely 
pose of this program is the incredible and our guys re- 
discovery, development and sponded to the pressure like 
encouragement of youth tal- seasoned pros and hit theu- 
ent m both countries. performance on the nose — 




Let's do our part 



RfejCycle 




A. Directory OfJkutiocb Area dtjurchcs 



Graceland Baptist Church. 256 Ida St., Antioch, II. 
Sunday School 11 a.m.. Morning Worship 11 a.m., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robsrt V^lllians, Pastor. 

Rral Church of Chrlal, SctonUst & RoBdlng Rm,. Rio. 
173 and Hardon, Aniloch. Phono (70B) 395-1 196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Sorvico 10.-30 a.m. Wednesday, 
Bp.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church, 554 Parkway, Phono (70B) 
393-3393. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday Worship 
1 la.m. and 7p.m. Pastor, Rev. Lloyd G. Moss, Jr. 

SL tgnallus Epticopal, 977 Mom SI.. Phona (708) 
395-0652. Low Mass 7;30 a.m.. High Moss 930 a.m. 
Sunday School & Nufsery 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church Tlllony Rd. Phone 
(70B) 395-4 117. Sunday School 9.-30 a.i.i., Sunday 
Worship 6:1 5 a.m. and 11 a. m., Children's Church 11 
a.m. Nursory both son/lcos. Awana Club, 6:30 p.m. 
Wodnosday 

SL Slcphon Lutheran Church, Hillsldu A Rio. 59 Phone 
(708) 395-3359, Sunday Worship, B and 10:30 a.m. 
Church School 9:15 a.m., Sunday Rov. Ohailoa £. Millor, 
Paslor. 

Christian Lllc Fellowship AssembllcB of God Church, 
41625 Deop LoKo Rd„ Aniioch. Phono (70Q) 395-B572. 
Sunday School (all agos) 9 a.m., Sunday Morning 
Worship 10 am., Childrnn's Church 10 a.m„ Sunday 
Evening Worship 630 p.m., Wodnasday Worship & 



Chlldron's Program 7 a.m., Tues. Wonvn's Followsh'p i 
Bblo Study 9 - 1 1:30 a.m. JoU Brussaiy, Pastor. 

Faith Evangelical Lutheran, 1275 Main SI. Phona 
(708) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 a.m., 
Sunday School 9:25 a.m., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. Darald 
Gruen, Rev. Gregory Hermanson. Pastors. Christian 
Day School (70B) 395-1664. 

Mlilburn Congregational United Church of Christ. 
Grass Lako Rd. al Rio, 45 Phono (70B] 35Q-5237, 
Sunday sorvico 10 am. Children's program 10 a.m. Rov. 
Paul R, Melizer, Pastor. 

Untied Methodist Church of Antioch, 848 Main St. 
Phono (708) 395-1259. Worship al 0:30 a.m. S 10:45 a.m 
Church School - classes lor all ages. 9:30 a.m. The Rev.' 
Kurt A. Gamlin, Pastor. 

SL Pclor'a Church, S57 W. Lako St., Aniioch, Phono 
(708)395-0274. Masses woohdays, 7:15 & 8 a.m.. 
Sunday 630, 6, 9,-30, 1 1 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 530 
p.m, Pasiw Rov, Father Lawronco Hanloy, 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church, 23201 W! 
Grass Lako Rd., Antioch. Phono (70B) 838-0103. Sunday 
Sorvico 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Nursery provldod. Junior Church 
during morning worship. Paslor Osn Swoollng. 

OoodShsphsrd Luthsran Church (lAlasouri Synod), 
2S100 W. Grand Ave. (RIt. 59 & 132), Lake Villa. (708) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 a.m.; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 030 B,m. Rev. John 
Zsllrmr, Pastor. Christian Preschool, 




Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home Qf Antioch 



6 Lakeland N«wspap«ri 



Friday, Novembor 6, 1992 



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Agency seeks to ease blow of EPA penalty 



by GREG MILLER 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Chain O* Lakes Fox River 
Waterway Management Agency will try to 
ease the burden of a U.S. Environmental 
Agency (EPA) fine during a Nov. 18 
meeting. 

The Waterway Agency faces a 
$125,000 flne for violations of the Clean 
Water Act in Fox River Valley Gardens 
back in 1991. The original $10,000-a-day 
fme climbed to a total of over $4 million, 
but the maximum allowed by federal law 
is $125,000. 

The violation came before the tenure 



of Dr. William Dam, newest chairman of 
the Waterway Agency. Me said unpermit- 
ted projects won't take place again. 

"They elected me chairman with the 
knowledge that 111 go by the book," Dam 
said. *^e'll get the permits first" 

The EPA says the Waterway Agency 
didn't go by the book when it "illegally 
discharged dredge spoils onto some four 
acres of emergent and sedge meadow 
wedands." 

The agency did have a permit to dredge 
but had agreed to find an approved non- 
wetlands site to dispose of the spoils. 




Athlete of the week 



Congratulations to Chris Passarella for being selected Athlete of the week 
for the week ending Oct. 10. Passarella shot an 82 at the IHSA Regional Golf 
Tournament, which qualified him for the Sectional toumament. The First 
Chicago Bank of Antioch will make a donation to the high school scholarship 
fund in Passarella's name. Pictured with Passarella are: ACHS Golf Coach 
Roger Aim and Carl McWherter, president of First Chicago. 



Girls Iceless Hocke y 



Results of Oct. 24 

HunDivisicHiGnKlul-2 
W L T 



Pis. 

10 

8 

5 

2 

2 

I 



Mapleleafs 5 
Sabe» 4 1 

Kings 2 2 1 

Rangers I 3 

Cougars I 4 

Blues 3 1 

ResulU 

Mapleleafs 9, Kings S 
Satwrs 7, Rangers 6 
Cougars 7, Blues 5 



Makita Division Grades 1-2 

W L T Pts, 

Penguins SOD 10 

Biuins 4 10 8 



F 



^rite 

Us 

Antioch News- 
Reporter wants 
to hear news of 
local people, 
events, clubs, 
organizations, 
etc. Black and 
white photos 
are also 
welcome. 
Please send 
news items to 
Daniel Becker, 
Mng. Editor, 
30 S. Whitney, 
Grayslake, 
60030 or call 
. 223-8161. 



n 



Northstars * 3 2 6 

Blackhawks 13 2 

Flyers 14 2 

Flames 4 

Results 

Penguins 18, Flames 3 

Bruins 10, Flyers 1 

NorUistais 4, Blackhawks 2 

Grettky Division Grades 3-4 

W L T Pis. 

Rangers 4 1 9 

Cougars 4 10 8 

Blues 3 11 7 

Sabers 13 1 3 

Mapleleafs 13 1 3 
Kings 5 

Results 

Rangers 5, Sabers 4 
Cougars 6, Blues 5 
Mapleleafs 4, Kings 3 

Savard Divison Grades 3-4 

W L T Pts. 

Bruins 5 10 

Penguins 4 10 8 

Flames 3 2 6 

Northstars 2 3 4 

Flyers 14 2 

Blackhawks 5 
Results 

Bruins 9, Flyers 2 
Penguins 4, Flames 3 
Northstars 6, Blackhawks 4 



Kings 5 

Blues 2 3 

Mapleleafs 1 3 1 

Sabers 1 .4 

Cougars 4 1 
Results 

Rangers 9, Sabers 1 
Kings 6, Mapleleafs 
Blues 3, Cougars 

Patrick Divtson Grades S-€ 

W L T 

Blackhawks 5 

Bruins 4 1 

Flames 3 2 

Flyers 2 3 

Penguins 14 

Northstars 5 
Results 

Blackhawks 5, Notthstars 1 
Bruins 5, Flyers 4 
Flames 4, Penguins 

Norris Division Grades 7-8 

W L T 

Bruins 5 1 
Blues 4 11 

Penguins 3 2 1 

Blackhawks 2 2 2 

Flames 2 2 2 

Northstars 2 3 I 

Flyers 1 4 1 

Rangers '4 2 
Results 

Blues 3, Br\iins 2 
Penguins 3, Flyers 2 
Blackhawks 5, Northstars 1 
Flames 4, Rangers 2 



10 

4 

3 

2 

1 



Pts. 

10 

8 

6 

4 

2 





Dam said the agency was using out- 
daLed aerial photos when it tried to restore 
a peninsula at the site with the dredging 
spoils. 

"I don't blame the EPA — thai's what 
we pay taxes tot — they were just doing 
their jdb," Dam said. 

The EPA subsequently rescinded all of 
the agency's permits, but they have been 
restored since Dam took over. 

Dam added he's ready to do what it 
takes to make amends with the EPA. He 
and Karen Kabbes, the agency's new exec- 



utive director, will ask the EPA to recon- 
sider the fine. At the very least, he'd like 
to see the fine money fed back into envi- 
ronmental projects in this area. 

Dale S. Byron, regional director of the 
EPA's Water Division, said the agency's . 
actions in 1991 compounded a problem. 

"Wetlands help keep rivers clean by 
filtering sediment and pollutants out of. 
runoff water," Byron said. "By damaging 
these areas, the agency actually com- 
pounded the sedimentation problem it was 
created to address."* 




Son of Antioch resident serves 
on nation^s oldest warship 

by ANDREW B. CLENDENNEN 

BOSTON— When 220 ships assem- 
bled in Boston Harbor this July to take 
part in the second to the last stop of the 
flve-month-long Grand Regatta Columbus 
'92 Quincentenary celebration, all eyes 
were focused on the breathtaking tall 
ships, on their acres of sail and the 
perfection of their masts. But none of the 
majestic vessels could compete with the 
affection local Bostonians hold for their 
own sailing ship, the USS Constitution, 
and none could match the vintage vessel's 
historic importance. 

Jerry A. Avila, the son of Rita Hill of 
Antioch, is proud to have the opportunity 
to serve aboard a part of the nation's his- 
'tory. Avila has served aboard the Consti- 
tution since April 1991. 

Avila, an electrician's mate, reports 
that Constitution crew members dress in 
period uniform and act as tour guides for 
thousands of visitors a year, in addition to 
performing ship's maintenance and carry- 
ing on the operating routine. 

"The Constitution is an exciting 
experience. One gets the chance to see 
what life was like in the 18th and 19th 
centuries," said Avila. 1990 graduate of 
Adams City High School in Colorado. 

USS Constitution began the maritime 
festivities on July 4 with its annual Inde- 
pendence Day Turnaround Cruise made 
through Boston Harbor. On July 11 it led 
the Parade of Sail and fired a 21-gun 
salute. On July 16 the Constitution also 
led the departure of the visiting vessels 
firom Boston. 

More than two million people were on 
hand for the .Quincentenary celebration 
events. Avila had a front row position for 
the excitement. 

According to Avila, the keel of the 
Constitution was laid down in 1794. The 
vessel was built by Col. George Claghom 
at Edmond Harrt's shipyard in Boston. 
Known as "Old Ironsides," because of the 
battle-proven toughness of her wooden 



Sailor Jerry Avila salutes In 1880's 
style as dignitaries board the USS 
Constitution for her annual July 4 
Turnaround Omise. — US Navy photo 
by Andrew Clendennen. 

sides, the live oak, red cedar, white oak, 
pitch pine and locust, of which the Con- 
stitution is constructed, came from states 
ranging from Maine to Georgia. Boston's 
Paul Revere provided the ship's spikes and 
copper sheathing. 

Although only 10 percent of the ship 
is original, it is the 10 percent that 
counts, says Avila The live oak, gathered 
from the sea islands of Georgia, formed 
the backbone of the ship which has kept it 
together and made possible numerous re- 
pairs and restorations of the vessel over 
the years since its initial commissioning 

in 1797. 

The man-of-war is now undergoing an 
extensive 18-month renovation process to 
prqjare her for the 1997 bicentennial cele- 
bration of her enu^ance to the fleet The 
USS Constitution is the world's oldest 
conunission warship. 

Editor's note: Andrew B. Clen- 
denneo is a Navy journalist 
working in conjunction with the 
Navy Public Affairs Center in 
?4orrolk, Va. 



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ACHS students mourn the 
loss of another classniate 



Antioch Community High School 
students now mom the loss of a second 
student in less than a year, after a fellow 
classmate died in a crash with a school 
bus. 

Andrew Perkins, 17, of Lindcnhurst, 
was pronounced dead at the scene of the 
accident, which occurred near III, Hwy. 
173 and Savage Road near Antioch at 
around 3:30 p.m. on rain-slicked streets. 

"It's a tragedy," said Antioch Police 
Ll Charles Watkins of the accident. "But 
it was just one of those things." 

This the second tragedy to strike 
ACHS in less than a year. In March, 



another ACHS student Kalherine Mason 
died of head and chest injuries suffered in a 
crash on Grass Lake Road while she was 
on her first date. 

According to police reports, Perkins' 
car was traveling east on Hwy. 173 when 
he apparently lost control of his car on 
the slick pavement and struck the bus 
head on. The bus contained three children, 
who received only minor bruises in the 
accident 

The driver of the bus, Vicki Laizurc, 
of Waukegan, was taken to St. Thcrese 
Hospital for minor injuries. 



Antioch yolleyball season ends 




by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The seamstress has been busy these days 
at Grayslakc Community High School. 

A big, white '92 is to the right of the 
banner donating Grayslakc High 
Northwest Suburban Conference volley- 
ball champions. And now, a new work 
order will be placed: for another '92, this 
time to be placed next to '83, the last 
time the Rams won a volleyball regional. 
In an intense match featuring several long 
rallies, the Rams outlasted their con- 
querors of a year ago, Antioch, 15-1 1, IS- 
IS. The 27-3 Rams advance to the 
Highland Park sectional this week while 
Antioch's season ends at 23-9. 

•'Antioch was tough. They moved a lot 
belter than ihcy did against Round Lake," 
Grayslakc Coach Dan Stacey said amid 
the high-fives and handshakes. 

"The 23-9 record is the best in school 
history, but il is not much consolation 
now," Antioch Coach Gwcn Vamcy said. 

Footlights 

(Continued from Page 1) 

we invite everyone to come on out and 
have a great time," said Footlights 
Publicity Director Fran Ano. 

The fund-raising event, which is 
sponsored by the church, will help fund 
both the parish general fund and Si. 
Peter's School, said Ano. 

The doors will open at 6 p.m. and 
close at midnight, with show start times 



The night did not bode well for the 
Rams at the outset. Antioch, led by 
sophomore Katy Hamey and senior Cori 
Todd and Laura Kocck zoomed lo a 6-2 
lead. A repeat of last year? 

"We weren't passing the ball very 
sharply. We were so pumped up; maybe 
too pumped up," Grayslakc standout 
Allison Waldenstrom said. 

WaldcnsU-om, a senior captain, has the 
spoUight at GCHS. She was named 
Homecoming queen, then all-confcrcncc 
volleyball. She had 11 kills against 
Antioch and said she prefers the volleyball 
success. 

Nikki Bonfanli was one of ihc key play- 
ers in the rally. She had a dink and a save 
which gave Grayslakc a sideoul. She then 
served for five points as the Rams look 
the lead. 

"Nikki is such a smart player. She takes 
advantage of what the defense gives her," 
Stacey said. 



Athlete of the week 



Congratulations to Chris Passarella for being selected Athlete of the week 
for the week ending Oct. 10. Passarella shot an 82 at the IHSA Regional Golf 
Tournament, which qualified him for the Sectional tournament. The First 
Chicago Bank of Antioch will make a donation to the high school scholarship 
fund in Passarella's name. Pictured with Passarella are: ACHS Golf Coach 
Roger Aim and Carl McWherter, president of First Chicago. 



Hungry football crowd served 
by ACHS parents group 



in specific rooms varying. 

Also, a shuttle service will be 
provided lo and from the school from 
several nearby remote lots. Tickets, which 
arc $6 on Fridays and $8 on Saturdays, 
can be purchased in advance at the local 
financial institutions, St. Peter's Rectory 
and other local businesses. Tickets 
purchased at the door will cost an 
additional $2. 



What does it take to feed hungry foot- 
ball fans? The members of Antioch 
Community High School's parent support 
group, Sequoit Pride, found out one 
Saturday afternoon as they manned the 
concession stand for ACHS's homecom- 
ing football game. With the help of vol- 
unteer junior class students, (he Sequiot 
Pride members served up 504 hot dogs, 
720 cans of pop, 42 large pizzas, 200 
cups of coffee, five gallons of cheese and 
36 pounds of com chips for nachos, 25 
pounds of popcorn, 264 taffy apples, and 
300 cups of hot chocolate. 

"We've learned a great deal about 
planning concessions since our 
Centennial introduction in June" said con- 
cession co-chairman and club president 



Steve Haenchen. "We watch our timing 
and prepare for the half-lime crowd. The 
workers are terrific and although there is a 
great deal of activity in a small space, ev- 
erything seems to run quite smoothly." 

Concession profits from the home 
varsity football games will benefit the ju- 
nior class sponsorship of ACHS Prom 
1993. Sequoit Pride would like lo thank 
the hard worldng students and parents for 
their continued dedication and support 

Sequoit Pride welcomes prospective 
members to monthly open board meetings 
on the first Monday of the month at 7:30 
p.m. in the ACHS Conunons. Ideas and 
suggestions from new members and visi- 
tors are welcome. 



Avon Twp. baseball hold candy sale 




The officers and parents of the Avon 
Twp. Youth Baseball organization would 
like.lo recognize the local businesses that 
helped to make the 1992 candy drive a 
success. Many local businesses have been 
called on through the years to help sup- 
port the organization through team spon- 
sorship. We extend continued thanks to 
all of the team sponsors. 

The businesses to be recognized at 
this time have donated cash, prizes or ser- 
vices which were received by individuals 
and teams that participated in the candy 
drive. Prizes were received from the fol- 
lowing businesses or individuals: Zips, 



Lovin' Oven Cakery, Vaughan's Chicken, 
World's Finest Chocolate, Terry 
O'Tooles, Allied Packaging, Talking 
Tee's Sanlo Sports Store, McGovem's 
Sporting Goods, Krislof s Enleriaiiunent. 

Park Pet Shop, Sammies, 
McDonald's, Ace Hardware Home Center, 
K Mart, Rosario's Pizza, Olando's Pizza, 
Diana's Dream, Dollar Video, Wayne's 
Pizza Place, Quality Trophy, Jim 
Donahoe, Brown's Chicken, Pepsi, Jewel 
Charters and Lakeland Newspapers. 

Thank you for your continued sup- 
port. 



Forever young installs new officers 



The Forever Young 
Senior Citizens Club in- 
stalled new officers at their 
meeting on Oct. 15 at tiie 

Lindenhurst Civic Center. 
The new officers are 
President Del Sherwood, 
Vice President Peg Haley, 

Secretary Ruth Notson, 
Treasurer Dolores Heigel. 
Appointed were Assistant 
Treasurer Helen Beager, 
Board of Directors Ellen 



Courtois, Dorothy 

Langbein and Bob Kreiger. 

The Forever Young 
Club is a social club for se- 
niors 55 and over. It meets 
at noon on the third 
Thursday of each month at 
the Lindenhurst\ Civic 
Center. Plans are being 
made to have entertaitunent 
or a program after lunch and 
then games will be played. 

The lunch at the Nov. 



19 meeting will be a box 
lunch from Browns 
Chicken. The cost is S3 .50 
including cake and coffee, 
there is a choice of light or 
dan meat.. Plans are being 
made for the Christmas 
party on Dec. 17. The dues 
are $5 a year and are now 
due. For more information 
call Dolores Heigel at 356- 
7514 before Nov. 13. New 
members and guests are 
welcome. 



Trick or Treat 



Several Antioch youths gather around the Halloween display in the First 
National Bank of Antioch on Halloween morning. The bank offered treats and 
a Pumpkin decorating contest for the children to compete in. Only seven- 
year-old f^ike Menzer and nine-year-old Ryan LeFave claimed their awards in 
their specific categories ,-:-Photo by Bill Carey. 



Women's Guild sponsors holiday events 



The Women's Guild of 
St. Ignatius present a 
Gingerbread House 
Chrisunas Craft and Bake 
Sale on Nov. 14 from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. 
Ignatius of Antioch 
Episcopal Church in 
Antioch. 



This event will feature a 
variety of band-crafted items 
for sale along with home- 
made baked goods and candy 
from the Women's Guild's 
Candy Cane Lane Bake and 
Candy sale. The Women's 
Guild will also be sponsor- 
ing a Gingerbread House 



contest at the sale, for 
which prizes will be 
awarded. Luncheon items 
and raffie prizes will also be 
available. 

For more information 
about this event call Sharon 

Wilde at 838-0129. 



i.lliK«fl|rtdf#^l«^;f, 



Fftaiy ,**<WiBlYibWl6.M992l 



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XIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 
GET "IT" OIT YOUR CHEST (708)223-8073' 



Lakeland 

Xcwspaiicrs 



iL.*i 



Upservice is a phone-in column presented as af^diweqf 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no 
claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland 
Newspapers does not claim the content or the subject 
matter as fad, but as the personal opinion of the caller. 
Lakeland reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain from 
printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your 
message 24 hours a day. Although the call is anonymous, 
please leave your village name. 

We Need Nurses 

Hi. I'm responding to the "caring," and I say. thai word 
lightly, person who wrote that they don't think we need 
nurses at our schools. If you have children, it's common 
sense that you would want them at a school that is safe 
and has someone willi enough training to know what to 
do in case of an emergency. Yes, secretaries arc 
probably capable of taking temperatures, but what if it's 
something more severe? Someone with training would 
make a difference in a split second situation that meant 
the life or death of a child. I think this person is more 
concerned with saving money than their own child's 
safety. I think you should get your priorities straight 

Lipservice Is Unfair 

Hello. We have subscribed to the Warren -Newport Press 
for many years. During these last several months, I've 
been reading your feature, Lipservice. I believe it is very 
unfair to publish the slurs and complaints that people 
are making against their neighbors, politicians, 
business people, judges in contests, behind the cloak of 
anonymity. These people are allowed to say things they 
wouldn't have the nerve to say face to face, or if they 
needed to be identified. I won't be surprised if your paper 
someday is sued for libel. I am Ann Nehls of Gumcc, 
III. 

Don^t Blame Unions 

I'm calling in response to the person who wants to 
blame all his problems on the unions of this country. If 
it wasn't for the unions, he'd probably still be working 
in a sweat shop. We wouldn't have child labor laws. 
We'd have no minimum wage laws. We wouldn't have 
safe working environments, fair wages. 40-hour work 
week, benefils, paid holidays and paid vacations. Need I 
go on? He should be thanking the unions. 

Keep Your Garbage 

Last weekend was the final straw. When walking on my 
rural street, there was a large tree truiik thrown out 
along with several pieces of the tree. Well, folks, it 
prompted me to call Lipservice. How would you like it 
if the people who live on rural streets look their garbage 
and dumped it in your towns. When I speak of garbage, 
I mean beer bottles, i2-packs of empty beer bottles, 
pop cans, mattresses, sofas, chairs, carpeting, lawn 
waste, tires, steel pifx^s, lawnmowers and wood. This is 
just a list of items in the last six months that have been 
dumped on rural roads in Grayslake. I, for one, am fed 
up with it. Do you think you are saving money by not 
having the garbage men to pick these items up? Think 
again. Every lime you dump something off on a rural 
road. I call Avon Twp. and they have to come and pick 
up these items. That's your tax money their using to 



It's a knov\/n fact that the world of golf 
and other enterprises throughout 

the world func'ion ori copying each 
other's products. Here at PRO CIRCLE 
we have the finest custom copies that 

play as good, if not BETTER than the 
original; saving YOU, the customer, 100s 

of$$. We back EVERY club SALE with 

our after purchase support to you from 

our staff, helping to guarantee you an 

improved game. 

POOR MAN'S PINGS IRONS 

Sold Individually or In sets. 



PRO CIRCLE GOLF 

1810N. Rt. 12 
Spring Grove 

(815) 675-2747 



'Jir-f-f 



come and pick this stuff up. I am one step away from 
using your town as my duiiiping ground. One morning 
you may see my gaibage in your street. 



Visit School Board 

Hey, Lake Villa and Lindcnhurst residents, wake up. 
You've got an interim superintendent that's breaking the • 
bank. Where are you, folks? You've got to be at ihe 
school board meetings to sec what's going on. 

Get Out Of Streets 

I work in Liberty ville and one thing bothers me about 
fund raisers in, and around Libcrtyville, as well as the 
Chicago area. These are (he lag days when they put 
volunteers out in ihe intersections. A recent tag day had 
volunteers with their collection cans at Rtes. 21 and 
137. This might be legal, but I think it's wrong. I don't 
buy newspapers or flowers when I'm stopped at a red 
light, and I certainly don't like to be solicited. I think 
this is also a possible danger to these volunteers, and I 
don't sec any reason why they can't confine their fund 
raising to shopping malls and grocery stores and other 
avenues where pedestrian traffic is plentiful. Thanks for 
letting me get this off my chest 

Where's The Fluff? 

I would like lo respond to the writer of "Fluff At LHS." 
This person stated that they had taken many night 
classes at LHS and couldn't believe the number of 
microwaves and cuisinarts in the cooking rooms, as 
well as the separate room lo store woks. 1 am a home 
«x>nomics teacher at LHS and have been here for 1 1 
years. To set the story sfraight. We have two 
microwaves that were bought in the early 1970s, and 
two others thai were bought in the early 1980s. These 
service two classrooms and about 250 suidents per year, 
as well as several night school classes. We have one 
cuisinart in the entire department, and a storage area 
which houses extra equipment — certainly not a wok 
room. It disappoints me lo read untruths in a family 
newspaper. One thing 1 have tried to instill in my 
students is a respect for others and an appreciation for 
telling the truth. I'm sorry to see a column that 



promotes people to abuse both these principles. Please 
feel free to call or visit lo verify these facts. 

Don't Complain! 

I'm addressing this lo everybody who moves out to the 
country from the city or the suburbs and thinks it's 
going to be 100 percent quiet and nothing is going lo ' 
happen. Many of us have lived out in the counu^ for 40 
yeare or more, I know my family has, my husband's 
family has and many of our friends' families have lived 
out here much longer than that. We are rather irritated 
by people who move out here, set up brand new homes, 
create a lot of racket for a couple years while their 
homes arc being built, and then complain because our 
animals make a little noise, or some of our machinery 
doesn't work quite the way it should at the proper time 
for them. We are a little tired of it. This goes on 
nationwide and it's a common problem. Remember, 
folks, country is a way of life; it doesn't come from a 
catalogue and it doesn't happen because you wear a pair 
of twill pants and a turtleneck on the weekends. 
Country has a tot of work going on in it; it is a 
lifestyle. We know it's disappearing, we're even willing 
lo accept quite a few new neighbors, maybe 10,000 or 
so, because we have to. Please don't move out here and 
complain about the animals or machinery. Check out 
the area before you come out here. We're willing to live 
with you, but you will have to be willing to live with 
us because we've been here longer. 

Nurses Are Needed 

I'm calling in response to the person who said we don't 
need nurses in the schools. I'm have a lot of nieces and 
nephews who go to the schools in the area. I believe we 
do need the nurse because they arc a very cnicial part of 
the school system. 1 know if one of my nieces or 
nephews needed medical attention quickly, I don't think 
the secretary could do the job. 

Nothing Wrong 

Hello. I'm from Fox Lake and I would like to say that 
the person who put the article in about Halloween is 
just sick. There is nothing wrong with children walking 

(Continued on page 13) 



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Lakeland's EDITORIAL 



Getting tax benefits 



Tax increases for open 
space purchases more 
appealing than 

education funding. 

Among the indicators of Tuesday's 
election in Lake County is a growing 
willingness on the part of electors to tax 
themselves for environmental and open 
space purposes and a reluctance to increase 
taxes for education. 

A question on issuing $1 million in 
bonds for the purchase of a lakeside park 
breezed to victory in Lake Zurich while 
school tax questions in Libcrtyvillc, 
Round Lake and Inglesidc went down to 
defeat. Lake Villa Library electors 
rejected a $6.5 million expansion 
proposition. Granted, the park purchase 
proposal was much less complicated than 
the school taxation questions, but the lop- 
sided results can't be taken lightly. 

For one thing, more and' more voters in 
mushrooming Lake County understand 
the relationship between growth and 
development and the increased costs of 
funding public schools. Build a home and 
you've got a losing proposition on your 
hands. Buy park land and future 



generations can enjoy the open space at 
minimal impact on lax bills. 

This understanding seemed to be a 
driving force in Lake Zurich for approval 
of the Brcezewald Park referendum which 
will add $15 to $20 to the typical tax bill. 
Park proponents did an excellent job of 
explaining the benefits of public 
acquisition of land that has been coveted 
by developers for high density building. 

Favorable taxpayer attitudes toward 
more public lands acquisition ought to 
give county officials encouragement for 
reviving efforts to win approval for a 
new bond issue for land purchases by the 
Forest Preserve Dist. A $45 million 
question for enlarging Forest Preserve 
holdings almost passed last year with 
only minimal support from County Board 
members. Cost to the individual 
homeowner would have been about $5 per 
year, a pittance compared to dealing with 
pressures put on educational 'funding by 
unbridled growth and development 
If expansion of public land holdings is a 
priority, voters have every right to 
demand that officials comply with their 
wishes while there still is a supply of 
desirable land to acquire. 



GOP dissatisfaction 




Viewpoint 



Misgivings over local 
issues detract from 
overall Republican 
showing. 

Republican leaders in the collar counties 
have only themselves to blame for the 
erosion of GOP support in normally 
subwban strongholds. 

Defections of Republican women in 
DuPagc County helped contribute to the 
phenomenon of Carol Moseley Braun's 
candidacy for the U.S. Senate. Originally 
slated for a sacrificial role in the senate 
campaign, GOP nominee Rich 
Williamson struggled with lack of 
conviction and support of party 
leadership. 

Heavy Republican voting in Lake and 
McHenry counties was lacking in 
Tuesday's general election, in our 
opinion, mainly due to voter 
dissatisfaction with local leaders rather 
than disgust with the Bush-Quayle dcket 
McHenry County GOP leaders 



misjudged opposition to a controversial 
freeway construction proposal and paid a 
price. In Lake. County, independent 
Republicans concerned about the 
relationship between high taxes, funding 
for education and over-crowded schools, 
and unrestrained growth and development 
have disengaged themselves from the 
party over environment and open space . 
issues. 

In a small way, Lake County 
Democratic candidates, particularly at the 
County Board level, attempted to 
capitalize on the disenchantment of 
Republican voters with their leadership's 
cmbracement of growth and development 
policies. It remains to be seen if a trend 
has been established. 

If anything, Tuesday's results support 
the theory that more and more voters, 
especially Republicans, view the parly 
from a total perspective. Putting it 
another way, modem Republicans aren't 
reluctant to bolt if someone looks better 
on the other ticket 



Family first 
for candidate 
won election 

by BILL SCHROEDER 

In an election campaign where family 
values was batted around as a major issue, 
one candidate for a Lake County Board 
scat took the message to heart, 

Ed FojUk look time out during the 
crucial final days of the campaign because 
of a family commitment. Right on, Ed. 

Fojtik, his wife and their daughter left 
town for a national horse show where 
Mrs. Fojlik is a prominent judge and their 
daughter is a serious competitor. The 
Fojtiks breed and show Arabians at their 
farm near Inglesidc. 

Absence from the campaign trail wasn't 
a case of over-confidence or contempt for 
the system. The Fojtiks made plans for 
llic major show more than a year and a 
half ago, long before Ed decided to enter 
politics seriously. Just call it a case of 
putting family values in.jDropcr 
. perspective. 

By the way, Fojtik was elected to 
represent Wauconda and Grant townships 
from the new Dist. 5. He is a 
Republican. 



College drinking 
has not improved 

Binge drinking is as serious 
among U.S. coilege students 
as it was in 1977; in some 
ways, it has worsened 

Frequent heavy drinkers* 
as percent of all students 



1977 



Need Lincolnshire residents 
to speak out on Rte. 22 




L 



• Five or more drinks In a row 
during past two weeks 

.Percent of students who say 
they drink 'io get drunk" 

1977 

Men 

Women 



Men 
Women 



SOURCE: Surva/ of 669 first-year 
students at four-year Mass. ccrfteges by 
Henry Wechsler and Nancy Isaac, 
Han/ard Scfiool of Public Health 




by BERYL FLOM 

The League of Women Voters of Lake 
County believe that Rte. -22 should be 
widened to accommodate both employees 
and residents. 

As Lake County has increased in its 
population and in its business centers, 
conmiuriities have worked together with 
the county to expand infrastructure 
including roads to service the economic 
base. Without such support, businesses 
will relocated and the housing market will 
fall, affecting all Lake County residents. 

Traffic congestion on Rte. 22 has 
reached the point where it is intolerable. 
Several communities along the road have 
developed large corporate offices and 
parks, industrial complexes, and shopping 
centers. Stevenson High School continues 
to grow and attract more cars. 

• Rte. 22 has always been the main 
east-west highway in south Lake County 
just as Rte. 120 is the main east-west 
highway in north Lake County. When the 
1-94 Tollway was built in 1957, the only 
complete interchanges were constructed at 
Rtes. 22 and 120 as traffic was intended to 
enter the Tollway from these two state 
highways. 

It appears that the communities along 



Rte. 22 have consented to IDOT's plan to 
widening except for Lincolnshire. Lake 
Zurich has figured out a way to have it 
pass through their village, but 
Lincolnshire refuses to compromise. Yet, 
residents of Lincolnshire mtist drive for 
many services, and corporations continue 
to mushroom along the Rte. 22 corridor 
within the village limits of Lincolnshire. 

Lincolnshire's new village hall is now 

being built at the junction of Rte. 22 and 

the Rte. 45 spur, so that anyone with 

business at the village hall must use Rte. 

.22. 

Why has the Lincolnshire village 
board made no effort to fo r mally survey 

Commentary 

its residents regarding their opinions on 
making it a four-lane road? 

The League of Women Voters of Lake 
County urges Lincolnshire to look at the 
bigger picture and to consider the needs of 
southern Lake County. 

Editor's note: Beryl Flom is 
president of the League of Women 
Voters of Lake County. She is a 
resident of Riverwoods. 



GUV VISITS— When Gov. Jim 
Edgar came to College of Lake County to 
announce the release of $11.5 million in 
capital funds for construction of a new 
classroom, he chose to hike from his 
helicopter landing point off Brae Loch Rd. 
to the south wing, much to the dismay of 
aides and a waiting police escort. 
Edgar still is recovering from treatment 
for a heart condition which he called a 
"procedure" instead of an operation. He 
looked trim and fit and told well-wishers, 
'Tm feeling great" Edgar dusted off an 
oldie after being introduced by Dr. Daniel 
LaVista, CLC president. 'Tm delighted 
to be here and after three weeks ago I'm 
delighted to be anywhere." 
A reporter quizzed the governor about 
the relationship between his visit to the 
Grayslakc campus and the proxunity of 
the general election. Gov. Edgar offered a 
serious reply and added that his visit to 
CLC originally was scheduled three weeks 
earlier "before I was detained." Next 
question. Whereupon a young thing with 
a reporter's notebook asked him to 
elaborate on his reply to the first reporter. 
So Gov. Edgar patiently responded and 
added forthrightly that there's no doubt 
there are some political benefits. But he 
added quickly, "I've always felt that good 
government is the best politics. And 
advancing education like the new building 
is good government." End of press 
conference. 

Considering the fact that the governor's 
original visit was scrubbed due to his 
untimely illness and the fact that the CLC 
funding had been top priority for two 
years after bi-partisan approval, the 
clumsy atu^mpt by the two reporters to 
put a political spin on Ed^jr's 
announcement was a cheap shot, 
thoughdcss and reprehensible. 
No wonder more and more people arc 
contemptuous of the media. 
•*••••• 
BIG GUNS— In the waning days of 
the campaign. Sheila Smith employed 
some heavy Democratic artillery to help 
her cause— two U.S. senators. BoUi Sen. 
Bill Bradley of New Jersey and Illinois 
junior Sen. Paul Simon, now the senior 
senator after Tuesday's election, were in 
Lake County shaking hands. Simon 
relishes the challenge of "pressing die 
flesh" in Republican territory. 
-k-kifkiKifk 
ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Cal lie, 
our German shepherd pup, likes to make 
sure pop has a handy bedtime snack. She 
regularly stuffs a cookie under the pillow - 
or bedspread. Only they're dog cookies. 
I'll have to Jet her know that I prefer 
oatmeal raisin. 



tn t«l/«lnnH WoWinaJ3<iri_,^ , . 



Friday, November 6. 1992 
•.'(¥1 .ii(iiiy<H'j>] , ;<.?■'/ 1 1f 










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Lakeland's OPINION 



Letters to the Editor 



*Gag* issue misleading 

Editor 

Wiio's gagging whom? 

Media's calling President Bush*s veto 
of abortion referrals at federally funded 
family planning clinics as "gag rule" 
makes me gag. The Title X law, passed in 
1970, was limited to preconceptive family 
planning only. Surveys show most 
Americans agree that their tax dollars 
should riot be used to promote abortion as 
a method of birth control. Contraception, 
maybe. But abortion? Not with my tax 
dollars! 

As for the "gag" issue/ who's gagging 
whom? Since 1975, the largest 
association of family planning clinics, 
Planned Parenthood (PP), has gone to 
court repeatedly to prevent informed 
choice! They have fought against a 
woman's right to know biological facts 
abut fetal development, physical, and 
mental complications of abortion, and 
alternative choices. She can't even know 
the name and credentials of the abortionist 
doing surgery on her. How can an 
intelligent choice be made? 

If that weren't "anti-choice" enough, 
PP has even gone to court to prevent 
abortion clinics from having to meet any 
sort of state health and safety standards. 
They even say she shouldn't counsel with 
her family or have 24 hours to think over 
her "choice." 

There seems only one choice the media 
and abortion profiteers want that girl to 
make. 

Now you tell me... Who's gagging 
whom? 

Diane Colette Smith 
Round Lake Beach 

Religion issue 
irresponsible 

Editon 

I would like to offer a thinking 
person's quiz for the voters in the 60th 
Legislative District: 



1. Why did the Gash campaign try to 
make religion one of the issues in the race 
for State Representative against Charles 
CardeUa? 

2. Why has the Gash campaign tried 
to misinform voters in the 60th District 
about the success of her opponent Charles 
Cardella's business, trying to claim it is 
on the verge of bankruptcy when, in fact 
he and his business are extremely 
successful? 

3. Why did the Gash .campaign try to 
characterize Charles Cardella's reasoned 
proposals for creating jobs and limiting 
taxes as "political extremism?" 

4. Why did the Gash campaign try to 
hide itself behind one issue: abortion, 
when the question of abortion has already 
been decided by the present U.S. Supreme 
Court and therefore would not come 
before the Illinois General Assembly? 

5. Why would a candidate confident of 
her positions and of victory permit her 
campaign to take on such an hysterical 
tone and engage in such irresponsible and 
"low road" tacdcs? 

Religious intolerance, deception, and 
character assassination should not be 
permitted in apolitical campaign. 

BiUO'Kane 
Highland Park 

Claims irrational 

Editor 

This letter is in response to Mayor 
Kay's news conference concerning Lake 
Zurich's "Toxic Dump." While attending a 
village meeting, the mayor announced to a 
stunned audience and an uninformed vil- 
lage board that he had been sitting on dis- 
turbing news about a toxic dump for two 
months that wanted to make him "sell my 
house and move out of Lake Zurich," that 
we were on a superfund list and it would 
cost S25 to S30 million to solve. 

When legitimate questions were raised 
concerning who put the toxic materials in 





Weekly 
median income 

(1992 dollars) 

Median 
housing price 

(1992 dollars) 



Are U.S. citizens better off? 

Some measures of whether Americans are better off now than In the 
last election year: 

Latest 

$440 (June) 

$103,600 (June) 

3.2% (Aug.) 

6% (Aug.) 

823.414(1991) 

(Aug.) 



fi^-jiinmstiits 



m inflation rate 



l^stuxieaiaKfi 



^m Prime intetest 

i:f^^ rale 



State, federal 
prison population 



1988 

$454 

$106,000 
4.1% 
10.5% 

631,990 




American 
hostages abroad 



^■" 




Unemployment 



Living under 
communism 



6,819.000 
(5.4%) 



1.7 billion 



9,970.000 
(7.8%) (June) 



1.2 billion 



SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Naiionaf Realtors Association. The SentanciOQ 
Project, Federal Reserve 



the dump, and several responsible area 
business were mentioned, the mayor re- 
sponded by saying tiie situation was too 
libelous for him to comment on, casting 
doubt on innocent area employers. 

Responsible journalism has revealed 
that tests have not been performed to show 
that the old village dump is leaking any- 
thing into anyone's water supply, that we 
are not on anyone's superfund list and no 
amount of money has been deteimined to 



be spent at this time, if it need be spent at 
all. 

For a community leader to make these 
unsubstantiated claims in a press confer- 
ence and to cast doubts about a communi- 
ty's water supply and the integrity of local 
business is irrational. The mayor has not 
shown any compassion for the residents of 
Lake Zurich as homeowners or as parents. 

Charles P. Crawford 
Lake Zurich 



*f^ 



Country Gifts and Home Accents 
Join Us For . . . 

Christmas 

Walk Sunday 

"Along The Fox" Nov. 8th 

In McHenry 10:00 a.ni. - 



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Lakeland's OPINION 



I 

|i 



Mother Nature helps candidates 



i$SiesMt-- 



SIGNS WARS END 

What candidates in this year's election 
didn't take care of, Mother Nature did last 
weekend. 

Hardly any signs remained for election 
day after the big wind and rainstorm. 

Especially vulnerable were the big 8- 
foot by 5-foot sheets of plywood candi- 
dates proudly paint or paste their name. 
Gone, too, are most of the others. That 
saves the candidates and their volunteers a 
lot of time. 

One of the cleanest intersections in 
Lake County is Fairfield Rd. and Rie. 176 
near Wauconda. All four intersections 



have been a favorite spot for candidate 
signs since September. 

No sooner arc they up than they were 
gone. New signs on Saturday were gone 
Sunday. The same for that day's replace- 
ments. 

The people at Lakcwood Forest 
Preserve take credit for this. "No cam- 
paigning on public property," they say 
about county-owned land. 

HOUSE HUNTING 

AI Salvi, our new state representa- 
tive in the 60lh DisL is still a resident of 
the 61st. Dist. in Libertyvillc. He can't 



Paying for presidential campaigns 

There were 32 million taxpayers in 1991 who designated on their 
returns that a dollar be contributed to the presidential campaigns. 
Map shows percent of contributors by state; national average is 20%. 



9-12% 



Q 13-16% 



17-20% 



121-32% 









.'• "^ ^ 




fi^rh^- 


x" 




% ' "vX 






: -,• ■>■■■ 




Income tax campaign check-off declining 



Percent of total 30% 
returns since 1976 
indicating presi- 20 
dential campaign 
contribution 10 

check-off: 





4 •«« fe ••••*■ k **« t * M •■•■ >« 



MII»M«'M'«»f«l**M 




19.5%| 

76 78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 " '90 



SOURCE: Federal Election Commission 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY INCREASE 

FOR GRANDWOOD PARK DISTRICT 

I. A public hearing to approve a proposed property tax levy 
Increase for GRANDWOOD PARK DISTRICT for the fiscal 
year 1992-1993 will be held on November 18, 1992 at the 
GRANDWOOD PARK DISTRICT, 26640 Hutchinson, 
Gurnee, Illinois 80031. 

Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and 
present testimony to the taxing district may contact DAVID 
BROWN, President of GRANDWOOD PARK DISTRICT, at 
708/623-1555, 

II. The corporate and special purpose property taxes 
extended for 1991-1992 were $67,284.39. 

The proposed corporate and special purpose property 
taxes to be levied for 1992-1993 are $81,766.00. This repre- 
sents a 21 .5 percentage increase over the previous year. 

III. The property taxes extended for debt service and pub- 
lic building commission leases for 1991-1992 were 
$24,624.39. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service 
and public building commission leases for 1992-1993 are -0-. 
This represents a reduction over the previous year. 

IV. The total property taxes extended for 1991-1992 were 
$67,284.39. 

The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 1992- 
1993 are $81,766.00. This represents a 21.5 percentage 
increase over the previous year. 

That said hearing is held In accordance with an Act known 
as "The Truth in Taxation Act". 

DAVID BROWN, President 
GRANDWOOD PARK DISTRICT 

1192A-174-WNI 
November 6, 1992 



soil his home. 

Salvi, a native of Lake Zurich, has 
60 days from Nov. 3 lo take up residency 
in his new district It stretches from just 
outside Libertyville to Lake Zurich 
and Barrington lo Fox Lake. 

Salvi is trying, real hard, lo find a 
home! And lo sell his Libertyville one. 
But that's easier said than done. 

One thing is for sure, though. He will 
have his district office in Wauconda. A 
search is now underway for suitable quar- 
ters. 

TEXAS CONNECTION 

Coming next week is a new book enti- 
tled "The Mob, the CIA and George 
Bush." 

Many of its pages involve Ihc nation- 
wide savings and loan scandal. 

Considerable ink is given to a man 
with former Lake County connections. 
He is Joe Grosz, one-time director of 
Home Federal Savings and Loan. First of 
America took over the failed thrift, which 
had offices in Grayslake, Fox Lake, 
Lindenhurst, Lake Zurich, 
Waukegan and Round Lake Beach. 

Grosz rales lop billing in the book for 
the demise of the San Jacinto Savings and 
Loan in Houston. It failed at a cost to 
taxpayers of more ihan $3 billion. 



THE NAME GAME 

In Wauconda is a politically ambi- 
tious Democratic Twp. chairman named 
Kenneth Sjorsiev (sors-luv). 

After running unsuccessfully two years 
ago for village trustee, he came to the 
conclusion his longue-lwisling name 
needs changing. "I wanted something ihat 
will fiow as well as one with some mean- 
ing," he said. 

Chrislcnscn it is. That was the family 
name somewhere in historical Denmark. 
An ancestor changed it to because of the 
ancestral hometown in which he lived at 
the time. It was a common practice. 

That might have been okay in 
Denmark of the past, but not Wauconda of 
the 21st century. 

Look for the new Kenneth Sjorsiev 
Chrislcnsen one of these days. And on 
next April's ballot look for Kenneth S. 
Christensen. 




BUILDING INFLUENCE 

Want to join a prestigious group? 
Call Pat McCloskey, president of the 
Avon Twp. Republican Club. 

He's forming the Commerce Circle. 
"It's for entrepreneurs and businessmen 
who believe in the economic growth of 
our township," he said. 

Membership is $25 for a 1/4-pagc ad 
in the club's March dinner program book 
or $50 for a 1/2-pagc ad. 

This also includes printing of a busi- 
ness patron roll ranging from fiowcrs to 
furniture. Avon Twp. GOP Club pur- 
chases will be made through the list 
whenever possible. Members will, like- 
wise, be urged to do the same. 

Attendance at the dinner will allow 
Commerce Circle members to rub elbows 
with the political power brokers. 

What's it all mean? "Build club mem- 
bership, support and infiuence," • 
McCIoskcy said. 



Letters Invited 

Letters lo the editor arc welcome. 
They should be on topics of general 
interest, approximately 250 wwds or 
less. All letters must be signed, and 
contain home address and telephone 
number. The editor reserves the right 
to condense all tellers . 




Robert R. McConnick University Clinics 

University of Health Sciences/ 

The Chicago Medical School 



Lake County's 
UNIVERSITY GROUP PRACTICE 

in 

PRIMARY CARE and 

SPECIALTY MEDICAL SERVICES 

: — November Featured Service 



Diabetic or Sports 

FOOT CONSULTATION* *37.50 

•Includes foot examination and 
evaluation by our Podiatrists 

JAMES ELIPAS. D.P.M. 
M. MUNIR MAGHRABI, D.P.M. 



3333 Green Bay Road North Chicago 

CALL 473-4357 



tAtirixA* NMiMthAi^^ ilOKt'^ 



H-iii^ ^ 



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GET "IT" OFF 
YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 







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ITS THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 9) 

around, celebrating Halloween. Anyone who would put 
a downer oh a child's holiday is pretty sad if you ask 
me. I would also like to say that there is nothing 
Satanic about children taking candy and having a good 
time. 

Don't Deny Kids 

Hi. I'm from Round Lake and I'm responding to the 
woman who said Halloween is evil. What gives you the 
authority to judge. God wants us to judge no one and 
love everyone. As for judgment day, where will you be? 
How will you answer for uying to deprive little children' 
from a few hours of joy and happiness. Everyone who 
trick-or-treats is not evil or Satanic. That's a really sick 
and mixed up attitude. What do your kids do on the 
holidays, sit and stare at the wall? 

Bump In The Night 

In reply to Devilish Halloween and Satan's Day, if you 
wish to blow a child's simple holiday out of proportion 
into good versus evil, that is your prerogative. 
However, this is soon to be the 21st century, not 
medieval limes where we have to worry about things 
that go bump in the night. So, let's just let the kids 
have their fun. If Halloween is so evil and Satanic, why 
do churches sponsor Hallov^ccn events? 

HHA Club 

Hi. This is for the Halloween Mcanie. Why don't you 
form an HHA club — Happy Halloween Anonymous? 
My boys will be Ninja Turtles whether you like it or 
not Calling cartoon characters demonic is insane. 
Taking fun and happiness from children is a sin in 
itself. If you were a real Christian, you would know 
that. So, lighten up, buy some candy, give it to all the 
lilUc ones who knock at your door and put your mind at 
case that they arc not Satanic worshipers begging for 
your candy. Life is too short to be judgmental of others. 
How many ways will you come up with to destroy 
Chrisunas, too? As long as the true meaning of our 
holidays arc not lost, then there is no harm in making it 
exciting for our children. 

Volleyball Help 

We're from Lake Zurich and new to the area. We knew 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



that some of the Lake Zurich High School sports were . 
good.but some of them very young. I think the only 
way volleyball is going to improve is if coaches quit 
coaching. Negativity is not the way to have a winning 
season. Listen to us, coaches, learn z lesson for next 
year. 

Meaning Of Halloween 

I'm from Anlioch and I'm responding to "Devilish 
Halloween." I think people really do know the meaning 
of Halloween. It has been, in effect, since this century, 
Ireland. People have been dressing up, scaring away 
members of their family who they thought were Hying 
to possess them. Trick'-or-treating has been in effect 
since 9lh century Europe. People would walk around on 
All-Souls' Day, begging for square biscuits. The 
beggars promised to offer up prayers for the dead 
relatives of the donors. The number of prayers were 
proportional to the donor's generosity. I don't think any 
body's really lost the meaning of Halloween. 

We Want To Pray 

I live in Barrington and I go the St. Francis Catholic 
Church in Lake Zurich. I was very much surprised when 
the priest was up at the altar and made the 
announcement that people were leaving early from 
church. I'd also like to say that I wish he would make 
the announcement that people who bring their small 
children which constantly cry throughout the church 
service should stay in the "cry" room. There's a purpose 
to the cry room. Let us people pray and have some 
peace and quiet while we are there. 

How Many Times? 

Do you ever wonder how many limes you have to call 
Lipservice to find your comment printed, I've called 
more timcs,I can count, and it hasn't been in here yet. 
People call about less important things, and theirs is 
printed. I'm just wondering what one has to do to get 
something in Lipservice or who you have to know. 
Well, we'll just have to sec. 

Editor's Note: We receive scores of calls each week and 
it is impossible to print all of them. At last count, 
approximately 75 percent of the calls are printed. We 
would like to print all of them, but due to space 
limitation, we cannot. Please continue to try. 



Stop Whining 



This is to the lady who was whining about her home in 
Fox River Shores and said it was falling down around 
her. You know, they have to meet government standards 
to build all those houses and each house is inspected 
before you move in. Are they all bad? If they are so bad, 
they why have they been able to sell hundreds and 
hundreds of them over years and years. You'd think that 
somebody who complains a lot like you would go out 
and warn them. I have a house that I recently bought and 
wish I had aluminum siding so I wouldn't have to 
maintain it. Slop complaining, lady, and move. 



Yeah, Grant! 

I'd like to applaud the Grant freshmen football team for 
being undefeated in conference play this season. I would 
also like to congratulate the sophomores and varsity on 
their seasons, too. 



t 



Stop Honking! 



START SAVING 

NOW! 




OPEN A 1993 

STATE BANK OF ANTIOCH 

CHRISTMAS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 



CHRISTMAS IS COMING... 
iiiid \vc knoM', hccausu thnnssinds of 
dollars are hcin^ mailed to over 1100 
ntciiihers of our 1992 Clirislnias Club. 

Our 1993 NEW CIIUISTMAS SAVINGS 

ACCOUNT opens Oclobcr 15... 

Sign up in Antioch ni' Lindciihursl Tor a 
$5, $10 or $2(1 account and really enjoy 
Christ mas next year, with intcrcsl, and 
all hills "PAII> IN FULL"! 



I'm calling from North Chicago regarding people who 
constantly honk their horns because they arc loo lazy to 
get out of the cars, walk up to the door of the people 
they want to see. This is especially for the people who 
are being picked up in the mornings for work. They 
know they're being picked up, yet their friends have to 
sit out there at 6 a.m. and honk away because the people 
inside are loo stupid to tell time. 

When Does It End? 

I think it's rather unique that the stale legislature put a 
property lax cap on the six surrounding counties around 
Cook County. So, you'd think your taxes would be kept 
down. Then what do they do? They increase the 
valuation by 15 percent and then go less than the lax 
cap. Now they want lo have an income tax increase for 
the public schools. Where's it going to end? 

Thrilled Kids 

I just had lo call to say I've had a fun afternoon with all 
of the trick-or-ireaters who came to my house. A" 
majority of diem had an older brother or sister or parent 
with them. They were so thrilled widi the litde bit of 
candy you gave them. It was an exciting thing for mc to 
sec all these kids in their costumes. I can't believe 
someone would call and say that this has something lo 

(Continued on page 24) 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



I r 



Toys for Tots campaign 



The United Slates Marine Corps 
Reserves of Weapons Company 2nd 
Battalion, 24th Marines, headquartered in 
Waukcgan announced the kick-off date for 
their 1992 Toys for Tots Campaign. 

The Toys for Tots Campaign is a 
nation-wide campaign started in 1947 by a 
Marine Reserve lieutenant colonel. 
Locally, this program collects and 
distributes toys to less fortunate children 
in Lake County. 

The 1992 campaign is set for Nov. 21 
in the Showcourt near entry G at Gumcc 
Mills Mall. On hand will be John Roper 
of the Chicago Bears, this year's celebrity 
chairperson. Additionally, Six Flags Great 
America cartoon characters Bugs Bunny 



and Daffy Duck will participate in the 
kick-off celebration. Also, Santa will be 
on hand to collect all of the donated toys. 
The kick-off will begin at 11:45 a.m. to 
the music of a brass septet from Great 
Lakes Naval Training Center. 

The Marines of Weapons Company 
will collect toys until Dec.21. Toys for 
Tots barrels will be located throughout 
Lake County, at selected department 
stores, banks, schools, realtors.police and 
fire departments, chambers of commerce 
and at Gumee Mills. 

Anyone interested in donating a toy or 
otherwise support this program should 
call the Marine Reserve Center in 
Waukcgan at 623-5517. 



Memorial service planned 



,^. 



This 'Buddy' is best 



Everyone is invited to 
the sixth annual memorial 
service for the indigent of 
Lake County at St. Anasta- 
sia Catholic Church on 
Douglas Ave. in Waukegan. 



The candle-lighting celebra- Anastasia Church, Rev. 

tion of life through prayer Ernest G. Hall, executive 

and song will begin at 1 director of Interfaith Chan- 

p.m. plaincy Services Inc., Rev. 

Participants Will include Kathleen Busby of Victory 



Rev. James Donovan of St. 



Make a difference 



Lake County residents 
can lend a hand for national 
"Make a Difference Day" 
Nov, 14, Sponsored by the 
Lake County Forest 
Preserve and Abbott 
Laboratories, the goal of the 
program is to encourage 
people to spend a day doing 
an activity that makes a 
difference in their 
community. 

Help is needed with a 
major wildflower seed 
collection project at Lyons 
Woods Forest Preserve in 
Beach Park. From 9 a.m. 
until noon, volunteers will 
collect seed for use in 



Completes 
training 

Army National Guard 
Pvt 1st Class Kwame M. 
Beckwith has completed 
training at the U.S. Army 
Infantry School at Fort 
Bcnning, Columbus, Ga. 

He is the son of 
Gwendolyn A. Beckwith of 
North Chicago. 

Directors named 

The Lake Forest Sym- 
phony Association, Inc. is 
pleased to announce its 
1992-93 Board of Directors. 
From Lake Forest, officers 
are: president, Jean A. Beck, 
Executive Committee 
Chairperson, James P. 
Richter, Executive Com- 
mittee members: William 
L, Bramer and Secretary, 
Mrs. Donald H. Gately 
from Lake Bluff. 

New members of the 
Board of Directors are: 
Robert Beck, Dr. Richard 
Cotirell, Peter Fritts, Harry 
Hoopis, Mary Beth Jones, 
Michal McClure, Thomas 
Meador, Robert Ross and 
Manly Giblin Schnitz. 

New advisory board 
members are: Howard 
Adams, Zavier Bontano, 
Mrs. Ablbert B. Dick, III, 
Laurence Carton, Charles F. 
Clarke, Jr., Dr. Betty 
Hutchison, James Lockhart, 
Albert Lowe, III, David 
MacKenzie, Jack Reichert, 
Donald Sullivan, Philip 
Sweet, Jr., Cornelius Waud, 
Alain. Wood-Prince and 
Ronald Young, 



establishing a new prairie at 
Ryerson Conservation Area 
near Rivcrwoods. 



Memorial Hospital, Mary 
Jean Gallagherof the Arch- 
diocesan Counsil of 
Catholic Women. 

Soloist will be Joan 
Martin. Organist will be 
Stephan Shebenik. 



Orphans of the Storm is 
thrilled to be able to feature 
an unusually outstanding 
dog as the Pet-of-the-Week. 
Buddy is a three-year-old 
neutered male. This hand- 
some cream colored short 
hair shepherdiycolUe mix is 
in excellent health. He is 
housebroken, excellent with 
children, smart, easy to 
train, playful and listens 
well. Buddy is well behaved 
and most important — one of 
the sweetest dogs on earth! 

This special dog wants 
to be your "Best Buddy" and 
is waiting for you in Cage 
78. A cash donation of $55 
includes a collar, tag, leash, 
two weeks medical caie, 
first shots and more. 

Orphans of the Storm is 
located at 2200 Riverwoods 
Rd. in Deerfield. Hours are 
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven 
days a week. Call 945-0235 
for further information. 




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Lakeland 

: Newspapers 




The changing of seasons 
is fruitful for Villiards 



A 1002 



by HEATH£R McDONALD 

Lakeland Newspapers 

At a time when children run to play in 
fallen leaves and dress up for Halloween, 
some families work hard in the chilling 
weather to make the holidays a little more 
comfortable for residents of a community. 
The Villiards are one of those families. 

The Villiards operate a roadside stand 
from May until December, and have for 
22 years. 

"We started because I didn't want my 
OOchildren to work anywhere else," said 
Roger Villiard, owner and founder of 
Villiards Fruit Market 

Having his children work for him, 
Villiard could ensure bis -children would 
learn about interacting with people and 
running a business. 

"Then, hopefully, they would cany that 
on into their other jobs," he said. 

Villiard said he and his wife. Ellen, at- 
tempted to open a stand in Libertyville 
where they reside. But the village said 
they couldn't 

'Then the Farmer's Market' opened and 
they asked me if I wanted to be part of it 
and I said, 'no,' " Villiard stated. 

The family had set up "tent" in 
Grayslake on the comer of Routes 120 
and 83, where they continue to operate to- 
day. 

Villiards Fruit Market opens in May, 
and their specialties are tomatoes and wa- 
teraielons. Other items include cucumbers 
and peppers. But to get perfect produce, 
you have to be willing to travel. 

"Oh sure, we travel all over, to Texas 
and Florida as soon as the spring season 
starts to get the best product," Villiard 
said. And they continue, even after 10 
years, to offer the best prices and the best 
service. 

After ten years, a 3-pound basket of 
tomatoes is $3. Lower prices seep into, 
the fall and winter seasons as well. 

When the stand reopens around 
Thanksgiving, Villiard said Christmas 
trees will range between $10 and $40 de- 
pending on the quality. Trees offered vary 
between spruces, firs, and different types 
of pines. 

Villiards also creates Christmas baskets 
with fruit. Customers can request what 
they want in the basket and also discuss 
pricing for the service. 

Customers are lop priority for the 
Villiards because they know it is the peo- 
ple that make the business. 

"If you don't service the public, you 
should quit, because they, can buy this 
anywhere," Villiard said. 

But at Villiards, what you want is what 
you get, according to Villiard. 

"We get many requests, and if we don't 
have it for them, we'll get it, no prob- 
lem," he said. 

Villiard maintains that it is because of 
the service, people keep coming back sea- 
son after season. 



"They come back on account of the 
price, but it's dealing with the same peo- 
ple who are loyal and have good prod- 
ucts," Villiard said. "We have some peo- 
ple come in here saying they used to 
come in with theu: grandparents and now 
they have children of their own. 

"One woman came in and bought an 
item, then said, 'well, I'll see you in the 
spring. I come back every spring, you 
taiow,' " he added. 

Despite the string of customers that 
come back every year (one couple from 
Evanston comes back every Christmas 
time to purchase a tree), Villiard knows 
that the roadside stand market is dying 
out Part of that is due to the increasing 
population and construction, not only in 
Grayslake but also throughout the county. 

"Grayslake is unique," said Villiard. "It 
today is what Libertyville was 10 or 15 
years ago. But it's not going to stay that 
way. 

"Houses are going up and traffic in- 
creases. It doesn't bother us, but you 
know, when traffic gets so heavy, people 
don't want to stop off because they're 
afraid they won't get back on. 

"We don't want that either," Villiard 
added 

But aside from having to lease the 
property, and hope traffic doesn't increase 
too much, the Villiards know someday, 
•the stand may be extinct because people 
don't realize what goes into the business. 

"We used to see a lot of roadside stands 
but we don't see them anymore," Villiard 
said. "Many people don't think there's a 
lot of work in it but we go to the market 
at 1 a.m. or 2 a.m. to find products peo- 
ple need. 

"You have to get there early to get the 
right stuff, and I don't think the younger 
generation would get up at that time," he 
said. 

Sometimes, the Villiards will not have 
to make a run to Wisconsin or Michigan, 
because their farmers will call and say it's 
a bad time, prices are high and the quality 
is not 

"Then we have to find it somewhere 
else," Villiard said. "When farmers have a 
short season, it hurts the business, but we 
do the best we can." 

According to Villiard, it's like any other 
business, "when it's nice, people come, 
when it's not diey don't. 

"But we have fun with it anyway."- 

Villiard said the business will continue 
"until someone decides to build some- 
thing on this comer," and then his son 
Greg will build a stand somewhere else. 

But until then, Villiards Fruit Market 
will prosper along with the seasons. 

Villiards Fruit Market is open 
seven days a week for wholesale 
and retail marketing. They are 
located on the corner of Routes 
120 and 83, and can be reached 
anytime at 223-7977. 



Roger Villiard discusses size and price of 
another customer browses outside Villiards 



the pumpkin with 
Fruit Market. 



a customer while 




iniroinnd Nowsoapors 15 



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I 



New buzz word, asset allocation is the first step in your mvestihg 



by FRED HOFFMANN 

The new buzz word in 
flnancial circles is asset al- 
location. Eveiyone seems 
to be talking about it, from 
investors to brokers to fi- 
nancial reporters. 

But, asset allocation is 
not a new strategy. So, 
why the sudden interest? 
Asset allocation gained 
attention in the wake of 
October 19, 1987 stock 
market crash. Just prior to 
the sharp decline in stock 
prices, several investment 
strategists who actively 
used asset allocation 
lowered their lecommended 
weighting on stocks, 
advising investors to put 
the majority of their 
portfolio into bonds and 
cash. 

Investors who heeded 
this advice were doubly re- 
warded—not only did they 
escape the 25 percent drop 
in the Dow Jones Industrial 
Average in October, they 
also participated in a five 
percent increase in the bond 
market during the month. 
What exactly is it? 

Specifically, asset allo- 
cation is a decision to allo- 
cate your investments 
among the three major fi- 
nancial asset classes — 
stocks, bonds or cash which 
includes certificates of de- 
posit and money market in- 
struments. That choice is 
usually made based on the 
expected returns and risks 
associated with each asset 
category. 

Asset allocation does 
not attempt to predict mar- 
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtm 



ket tops or bottoms. In the- 
ory, it systematically eases 
an investor out of a particu- 
lar asset as the risks 
become greater than the 
potential returns, generally 
near, but not at the peak. 

At the same time, it 
eases an investor into a de- 
clining market, as the asset 
becomes cheap relative to 
other assets and potential 
returns outweigh the risks. 
This strategy is designed to 
reduce volatility and risk 
while providing stable,' su- 
perior returns over the long 
term. 
Most Important 

Asset allocation is the 
fust decision an investor 
should make, and some say 
it is the most important. 
According to a study re- 
ported in Institutional In- 
vestor Magazine, "asset 
mix judgment accounts for 
as much as 95 percent of 
total return..." 

The stock, bond and 
cash markets move in cy- 
cles, depending on variables 
such as economic condi- 
tions, corporate profit ex- 
pectations, and short-term 
interest rates. How these 
variables interact to form an 
overall investment envi- 
ronment will determine that 
attractiveness of each asset 
class. 

For instance, high 
short-term interest rates 
may be negative for the 
stock market (depending on 
the market's level), but pos- 
itive for the cash equivalent 
market, meaning an in- 
vestor might do better hav- 



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more toward cash equiva- 
lents than stocks. 
Best asset 

But, how do you deter- 
mine the best asset alloca- 
tion at a given point in 
time? While advice based 
on sound asset allocation 
principles can be very 
valuable, investors should 
be aware that all asset 
allocation strategies are not 



weightings. For example, a 
computer-based asset alloca- 
tion model might use his- 
torical patterns of markets 
and market relationships to 
arrive at allocation deci- 
sions. 

To illustrate: Over the 
past 62 years, stocks have 
tended to outperform all 
other types of investments, 
offering an average annual 
return of 9.9 percent, com- 



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created equal. Investment' 
strategists use a variety of 
different techniques to arrive 
at recommended asset 
mixes. 

Because there is no 
"standard" of asset alloca- 
tion, the advice will vary 
from one asset allocator to 
another. Take» for example, 
a story in the Wall Street 
Journal on October 31, 
1988. Wilshire Associates, 
a company that tracks the 
asset allocation advice of 
major brokerage finns for 
the Journal, reported that on 
that same day in 1988 bro- 
kerage firms were recom- 
mending stock exposures 
ranging from 22 percent to 
too percent of an investor's 
portfolio. 

According to the 
Wilshire studies, some of 
the best asset allocation ad- 
vice comes from strategists 
who use computer models 
based on completely objec- 
tive information to deter- 
mine recommended asset 



pared to 4.3 percent for 
long-term government 
bonds and 3.5 percent for 
treasury bills. At the same 
time, stocks are consider- 
ably more volatile than 
bonds or T-bills, and thus 
offer a greater degree of 
risk. 

Compare returns/risks 

The model would com- 
pare the current expected rc- 
tiims of each asset type, and 
compare those returns 
against what have been 
normal relationships in the 
past Stocks are historically 



risldcr than bonds or cash; 
therefore, stocks should of- 
fer a greater potential for re- 
turn since the investor is 
assuming additional risk. 
This is called the "risk pre- 
mium." When the current 
expected return from stocks 
is greater than the risks, 
stocks would be considered 
more attractive than bonds 
or cash, and the recom- 
mended percentage of stocks 
in a portfolio would be 
higher. 

Investors should con- 
sider several factors when 
evaluating asset allocation 
methods. First, look for the 
track record. The new-found 
popularity of asset alloca- 
tion has spawned a host of 
"born-again asset 
allocators" with no proven 
technique or track record. 
Look for an asset allocation 
model with a published 
proven track record of 
stable, above-average 
returns over the long term, 
five years or l(Migcr. 

Keep in mind that track 
records refer to theoretical 
portfolios and market in- 
dices; real world returns 
may differ due to 



transaction costs and actual 
performance of specific 
securities. Second, be sure 
that the asset allocation 
model uses a, totally 
objective approach, taking 
the emotion out of 
investment decisions. Fi- 
nally, the asset allocation 
model must be followed in 
a disciplined manner. 

Although object asset 
allocation advice is by its 
nature often contrary to cur- 
rent market sentiment; fol- 
lowing a good asset alloca- 
tion model in a disciplined 
manner, regardless of cur- 
rent maricet trends, can en- 
able investors to achieve 
superior returns with mini- 
mized risk. 

Editor's note: Fred 
Hoffmann is first vice 
president of invest- 
ments for Paiae Web- 
ber in Oakbrook Ter- 
race. Your questions 
are invited by writing 
to Tiiis Way To 
Wealth in care of this 
newspaper or 2203B 
Lakeside Drive, 
Bannockburn, III. 
60015 or call the au- 
thor 1.800-874-OdOl. 



Business women to meet Nov. 12 



The Business and 
Professional Women of 
Lake County will meet on 
Nov. 12 at the Lambs Farm 
in Libertyville with social 
and networking hour at 6 
p.m. Dinner is served at 7 
p.m. and the featured 
speaker for the evening will 



the current facts concerning 
women's roles in the work- 
place and at home. Trudy 
Hellios, CHOICES Chair 

for Lake County BPW will 
also speak. For further in- 
formation call Melanie 
AUen at 949-1411. 



be Glenda Grane6 Gordon, 
Educational therapist and 

CHOICES Chair forDist. 3 
of BPW. CHOICES is a 

program designed to encour- 
- age higher education and ca- 
reer aspirations in teen girls 
by making them aware of 



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Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



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RE/MAX Advantage 
holds kickoff breakfast 

RE/MAX Advantage Realty hosted a network kick- 
off breakfast at the AnUoch Golf Ciub for their new 
Home Buyers Guide. This is the second guide which is 
designed to assist buyers through the real estate 
transaction. Seated left to right: Betty Pauley, Mike 
Culat, Joe Epifanio, Larry Fales, Mike Lescher, and Pat 
Ciko, RE/MAX Advantage brokers and agents. 
Standing, first row: Debilyn Cooksy of Antioch Golf 
Club, Beverly Terry of Antioch State Bank, Pat 
Nielsen, Sandra Stahl, Cindy Hill, Linda Mortensen,. 
Ilene Perdue, and Pal Forth, ElE/MAX Advantage 
brokers and agents. Standing, second row: Chris 
Morozin, attorney, John Tamarri of Commonwealth 
United Mortgage, Jorge Ortiz, attorney, Robin Kelly of 
State Bank of Antioch, Donna Jeanne Evans of Lakeland 
Newspapers, Paul Phillips, attorney with Soffielti, 
Johnson, Teegen and Phillips, Paul Diamond and Dave 
Unseth of CTX Mortgage, Dave Mills of Best Movers, 
Wayne Morlensen of Wayne Mortensen Construction 
and Remodeling, Don Wynia and Greg Owens of 
National Property Inspections. 




Personnel 




Carroll Anne Bonn 

Carroll Anne Bonn h«i been 
•ppointicd ma exteniion eduaiior, 
cctnmunUy leadenhip and volun- 
teeritm of the Univenity of OH- 
noil Cooperative Extension Ser- 
vice, Bonn provides program di- 
rection, coniulutlon and training 
for community groups. She joined 
the itafT of the GraysliJce Exten- 
■ion Center, ptrt of a new 
lUiewide. configuration of the 
Univenity of Dllnoii Cooperative 
Exteniion Service. 



New office • 

Tim Biglow of Gumee and 
Bob Graham of Antioch, agents in 
the Country Companies Lin- 
colnshire Agency, have opened a 
new office in Gumce. As agents 
for the Country Companies insur- 
ance group, Biglow and Graham 
are able to provide for all the in- 
surance needs of. their clients and 
area residents by offering auto, 
home, farm. Ufe, health, disability 
income and commercial insur- 
ance. The new office features an 
advanced computer system that is 
linked directly to the Country 
Companies home offices in 
Bloomington. The computer sys- 
tem can provide rate comparisons 
for auto, home, life and health in- 
surance to policyholders and 
Erospective customers in minutes, 
iglow and Graham will be as> 
si sled in the office by Willa Diet- 
rich and Bfxmie Kolh. 




New manager boosts 
Round Lake auto shop 





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Donald J. Harlow 

Donald J. Harlow has been 
appointed Small Business Expoit 
Development Center specialist at 
the CoUege of Lake County. Hj 
will direct die SBEEXT in providing 
practical assistance and personal- 
ized counseling to small and mid- 
size companies interested in en- 
tering or expanding their interna- 
tional business. Harlow's experi- 
ence includes 30 years in interna- 
tional business and sales in more 
than 65 countries.' He is an expert 
on the automotive, electronics, 
construction and transport indus- 
tries ai well as consumer prod- 
ucts. 



Christine Kharasch 

Christine Furman Kharasch, 
M.D., hat been appointed to the 
medical staff at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, Waukcgan, Dr. Kha- 
ratcn ii a family practice special- 
ist. She received her medical 
training at Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity Medical Center, Spring- 
field. She completed her intern- 
ship and residency at West Subur- 
ban Hospital, Oak Paric. 



Jim Pappas 

Jim Pappas of Inglesidc, an 
agent in the Country Companies 
Grayslake Agency,, has been 
awarded the prestigious National 
Quality Award (NQA) for signifi- 
cant achievement in life insurance 
sales. To qualify for the NQA. 90 
percent of the hfe insurance busi- 
ness sold must still be in force 
over a 1 3- month period. Such 
persistency of business is indica- 
tive of quality sales and service 
and in the best interest of the 
client. 



Donna Reeves 

Donna Reeves, LPN, CGN, 
(Waukegan) presented "Profes- 
sional Growth in Gasuocnterology 
Nursing" at the 1 1th Annual Mid- 
west Soday of Gastroenterology 
Nurses and Associates in Des 
Moines, Iowa. Reeves, « director 
of the certifying board of the so- 
ciety, discussed the importance 
and value of certification for gas- 
troenterology nunes in her pre- 
sentation. She is employed in the 
gaitroenterologjf lab of Victory 
Memorial Hospiul's surgciy Je- 
psrtihent and has been a member 
of Victory Memorial's staff since 
1974. 

Patrick Simon 

Patrick J, Simon of 
Wauconda, an ageiit in the 
Country Companies Lincolnshire 
Agency, has moved to the Country 
Companies office at 4170 Old 
Grand Ave., Gumce. As an agent 
for the insurance group, Simon is 
able to provide for alt the insur- 
ance needs of his clients and area 
residents by offering auto, home, 
farm, life, health, disability in- 
come and commercial insurance. 
Simon began his career with the 
Country Companies in 1990. He 
attended the College of Lake 
county and is" working toward the 
Life Underwriter's Training 
Council designation. Simon will be 
assisted in the office by Bonnie 
Kolh and Willa Dietrich. 




Bettina Zatuchni 

Bettina Zatuchni, M.D., has 
been appointed to the medical 
staff at Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal. Zatuchni is board eligible on 
obstetrics and gynecology. She 
received her medical training at 
Temple University, Philadelphia. 
Zatuchni completed her internship 
at Michael Reese Hospital and her 
residency at University of Illinois 
Hospital, both in Chicago, 



Tim Biglow 

Tim Biglow of Gurnee, an 
agent in the Country Companies 
Lincolnshire Agency, has been 
awarded the National Quality 
Award (NQA) for significant 
achievement in life insurance 
sales. TTiis is the sixth time Diglow 
has received the NQA since be- 
ginning his career with the insur- 
ance group. 



A management shift has 
proven to be a textbook 
case in business building 
for a local automotive me- 
chanical repair shop. 

In addition to its new 
manager, Classy Chassis 
Mechanical Repair Center, 
located on Rie. 134 in 
Round Lake, is emphasiz- 
ing the fact that it is a good 
quality mechanical repair 
shop, and planning a senior 
citizen discount day. In addi- 
tion, the shop's new emis- 
sions testing equipment al- 
lows drivers to lest their 
cars before emissions test- 
ing, or to find the source of 
failure. 

"For years, I drove by 
Classy Chassis and thought 
it was a body shop," said 
the new manager, Don 
Wehrheim. "While selling 
the fact that the business 
does good quality work and 
can handle the latest makes 
and models of everything 
from Chevrolets to Jaguars, 
the name was unfortunately 
suggesting that it was a col- 
lision-body shop, rather 
than a mechanical service 
business. 

"Owners Ken and Mary 
Gustafson and I discussed 
this situation, and we're 
now concentrating on get- 
ting the word out Uiat we do 



a full spectrum of mechani- 
cal repairs like engine tune- 
ups, brakes, and so on," 
Wehrheim continued. 

Wehrheim's new pres- 
ence in Round Lake has 
been the focus of some at- 
tention as well. Since the 
new manager is the former 
owner of five northwest 
suburban Amoco service 
stations, and a veteran of 
several other areas of auto- 
motive service, Wehrheim 
and Gustafson knew that bis 
name recognition would 
bring new customers as 
well. 

"We had responses on 
the very same day that we 
put Don's name out on a 
portable sign out front," 
said Gustafson. "He is 
known throughout the sub- 
urbs — in fact, some people 
who know his name don't 
know his face," 

Wehrheim maintains 
that the very best way to 
continue to build the busi- 
ness through post-reces- 
sionary times is through 
good people contact. 
"People want to know that 
we'll take care of their cars," 
he explained. "Folks are too 
busy these days to keep up 
on the latest in how their 
cars are built. Instead, that's 
why they look for certified 



mechanical technicians they 
can trust, and who won't 
take them for a ride or steal 
them blind." 

Wehrheim has begun a 
Senior Discount Day on the 
first Monday of each 
month, when all labor and 
services by appointment 
will be discounted 10 per- 
cent for everyone age 60 and 
over. 

"We care about giving 
good service, and we want 
to earn people's business," 
he said. "There are no gim- 
micks and no silly frills. 
People can see that we're 
just plain, good mechanical 
technicians. That knowledge 
is bringing them in the 
door." 

Since the business is 
across Rte. 134 from the 
Metra Station parking lot, 
customers are welcome to 
drop their cars off before 
commuting, and pick them 
up after the return com- 
mute. 

Classy Chassis 
Mechanical Repair Center 
offers a full range of auto- 
motive services for all U.S. 
and import cars. Sever 
manufacturers' extended war- 
ranties are honored. Hours 
are Monday through Friday, 
from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
For more information call 
740-9000. 



Sellout at auction brings $3,2 million 



A multiple property 
suburban Chicago auction 
held Oct. 18 was a sellout, 
bringing owners a total of 
$3,192,100. it was an- 
nounced by Sheldon Good 
and Company, Chicago- 
based national real estate 
auctioneers. 

Included in the auction 
was a manufactur- 
ing/distribution facility in 
Antioch, a luxury home in 
Ofland Park and a newly 
constructed luxury home 
and two wooded homcsites 
in Lemonl. 

'The Antioch property, a 
333,600 square foot facility 
situated on a 14.7 aae site, 
was purchased for $1 .8 mil- 



lion by a local manufactur- 
ing company. 

The Orland Park resi- 
dence, a 6,3000 square foot 
custom built luxury home, 
sold for 5816,000, a dis- 
count of nearly one-third off 
the original price of $1.2 
million. The home over- 
looks a Robert Trent Jones- 
designed golf course in the 
Crystal Tree subdivision of 
Orland Park. 

The buyer of a newly 
conslructed 6,200 square 
foot luxury home in 
Lemont also received about 
a one-third discount, pur- 
chasing the property for 
$381,000. It was originally 
priced at $569,000. 



Two one-acre heavily 
wood homesites in Lemont 
were sold for 5112,700 and 
582,400, substantial dis- 
counts off their original ad- 
vertised prices. 

"All of the sellers were 
satisfied with the results of 
the auction, and glad to be 
free of the carrying costs as- 
sociated with ownership," 
and Steven L. Good, presi- 
dent of Sheldon Good and 
Company. "The buyers 

were pleased to purchase the 
properties at bargain 
prices." 

The sale, held at the 
Wesrin Hotel O'Hare, 
Rosemont. 



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ANTIQUES & CRAFS • ANTIQUES & CRARS 





ANTIQUES & CRARS -ANTIQUES & CRARS 



America's desire to acquire keeps growing 



From baskets to baseball 
cards, steins to stamps, 
Americans never seem to 
lose their desire to ac- 
quire. According to a re- 
cent survey of collectors, 
collecting is even more 
popular today than it was 
a decade ago. 

Whether It involves a 
medley of music boxes or 
a bevy of baby dolls, col - 
lecting, according to the 
survey, is on the rise. 

Collecting appears to be 
an innate human trait, 
one that can be traced 
back to man's early days 
when things like animal 
horns and hides were 
coveted. Today's collec- 
tors, however, are much 
more varied in their col- 
lection selections. The top 
three items they collect, 
according to the survey, 
are figurines (22 percent), 



limited edition plates (21 
percent), and 
coins/medallions (15 per- 
cent). 

Other must-have, ac- 
cording to the survey, in- 
clude (in order of prefer- 
ence): stamps, doUs, 
china/dishes, glassware, 
baseball cards, Jbooks, 
crystal, animals, 
cars/pianes/trains, an- 
tiques, furniture, 
lithos/prlnts and 
steins /tankards. Low on 
the list were items such as 
jewelry, miniatures and ■ 
paintings. 

Experts point out that 
the reasons people collect 
are as varied as the items 
they seek. 

"For some people, col- 
lecting gives specJEd 
meaning and value to 
certain objects, helping 
them to retain a part of 



their past and preserve it 
for generations to come," 
says Dr. Jerrold Pollack, a 
clinical psychologist who 
studies collecting habits 
and trends, 

"For others, collecting 
presents a challenge 
where seeking out and 
finding objects that are' 
available in limited num- 
bers is the ultimate re- 
ward," he added. 
The Collecting Bug 

According to the survey, 
once a person has been 
bitten by the collecting 
bug, collecting becomes a 
long-term, if not lifelong, 
pursuit. Of those polled, 
42 percent have been col- 
lecting for more than IS 
years, and 32 percent have 
been doing so for eight to 
15 years, and 25 percent 
have been at it for eight 
years or less. 



"Collecting behavior 
begins early in most peo- 
ple's development, usu- 
ally in the pre-adolescent 
years, and reflects an 
emerging sense of identity 
and individualism," says 
Pollack. "Collecting can 
be a way to assert and 
express one's 
personality," 

Once a collection has 
been started, the desire to 
collect more and varied 
items is often the next 
step. Collecting in multi- 
ple categories around a 
single theme is a popular 
approach, according to 
Shay Gallagher, senior 
vice president of market- 
ing for The Bradford 
Exchange. 

"For example, an Elvis 
aficionado might have all 
of his albums, an auto- 
graph, admission tickets 



to his concerts and a scries 
of plates featuring his 
likeness," says Gallagher, 

How do people get 
started collecting? Almost 
a third of the respondents 
said they developed an 
interest in a particular 
item and liked it so much, 
they wanted more. 

According to 20 percent 
of those polled, a friend or 
relative turned them on to 
the hobby, either by giving 
a collectible as a gift or by 
promoting the merits of . 
their own collecting 
hobby. 

The survey showed that 
one of the primary rea- 
sons people collect is to 
pass along their cherished 
collections to future gen- 
erations. Seventy-eight 
percent of those polled 
said they collect so that 
their children and grand- 



children can enjoy the 
fruits of their efforts for 
years to come. 
Pleasure or Profit? 

For some collectors, 
there's more to the hobby 
than meets the eye. While 
an affinity for collecting a 
particular item may be the 
primary purchase motiva- 
tion for most collectors, 
there are those who col- 
lect for profit. Thirty per- 
cent of those surveyed 
agreed that investment 
played an important role 
in their collecting deci- 
sions. 

"It may be hard for some 
to part with their collec- 
tions, but it can be a smart 
financial decision. To buy 
an item and later sell it for 
a higher price can be a 
good investment. That's 
one reason why limited 
editions are so popular," 
Gallagher says. 



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Who's collecting what? 






Most people assume that 
if there's a collector in the 
house, it's likely to be the 
woman who has the de- 
sire to acquire. Not neces- 
sarily true, according to a 
survey commissioned by 
The Bradford exchange. 

Surprisingly, men ac- 
counted for 49 percent of 
the collectors surveyed, 
indicating that they like to 
acquire and amass almost 



as much as their female 
counterparts. 

In fact, men have been 
collecting everything from 
rare stamps to foreign 
coins for decades — and 
they've been doing so 
longer than women. 
Thirty-five percent of the 
men surveyed said they've 
been collecting for longer 
than 20 years, while only 
27 percent of the women 



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AMERICANA BAZAAR 

United Protestant Church 

54 S. Whitney, Grayslake 

Sat. Nov. 7 10-4 pm 

25 Selected Grafters & loaves & loaves of home- 
baked bread and other baked goods • Candy * 
Ornaments • Criafts • Jewelry • Linens • Collectibles 
White Elephant table & a "Shopping Room" for the 
kids! 
Pie, sandwiches, coffee & pop will be available. 




jfj\2 HANDCRAFTED GIRS 
TULIP 



OF DISTINCTION 



390 Lake St. 
Antioch, IL 

395-7331 



We have hard 

to find 
Thanksgiving 

Decor, 



Fabulous* 
Handcrafted Items'' 

• COUNTRY CRAFTS 

• SOUTHWEST 

DESIGNS 

• HOUDAY 
J-RADITIONS. 



HOURS 
Mon,-Thufs. 10-5 
Rl, 10-7 Sat. 10-4 



Have You Ever Nevered Before? 

Unique new shopping experience featuring collectibles, 
antiques, quality new & used merchandise, clothing, 

furniture, jewelry & much, much more! 
Bring a friend & join us for a cup of coffee! 

WANTED 

Your used Christmas decorations and also crafters 
with quality gift giving creations. (No toilet paper dolls) 





Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment 

Tues./Wed. 9-6; Thurs./Fri. 9-9; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 10-4 

651 West Railroad Avenue 
Round Lake, IL 

(Ace Hardware Home Center Pfaza) 

r708) 740-3320 



\r^ A SPtOAUZED Om.'HNG & PATCHWOflK SHOP * 

24417 - 75th Street (HWY. 50) 
Salem (Paddock Lake), Wisconsin 53168 : 



Grayslake 
cylNTIQUES 

COLLECTABLES 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 

IL120&U.S.45 

8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY 

November 6, 1992 

ADMISSION $2,00 



have been collecting that 
long. 

Although figurines and 
plates are popular with 
both sexes, the survey 
showed that other col- 
lectibles really separate 
the men from the women. 
The top five choices for 
men and women are as 
follows: 
Men — 

1. Coins/medallions, 2. 
Plates, 3, Figurines, 4. 
Baseball Cards, 5. Stamps. 
Women — 

1. Figurines, 2. Plates, 3. ' 
China/dishes, 4. Dolls, 5. 
Glassware. 

Women, the survey 
showed, are much more 
likely than men to collect 
as a means to decorate 
their home. Eighty-nine 
percent of women, com- 
pared to G6 percent of 
men, use collectibles as 
decorative accessories. On 
the other hand, men are 
more apt than women to 
be concerned with a col- 
lectible's investment 
value. 



DKl*Il£SSIO!<r EltA ' 
GLASS SHOW & SALE 

Saturday, Nov. 14 
10-5 p.m. 

Sunday, Nov. 15 
ll-4tp.m. 

RED CARPET 

CELEBRITY LANES 

S727 S. 27th Street 

Milwaukee, Wr 



t0% DISCOUNT WITH THIS AD 



1007o COnON FABRICS 

• NOTIONS • 'so YARD CLUB * QUILTS 

• CHARM BOXES • PAHERNS • GIFTS 
• BOOKS • CLASSES • FREE DEMOS 

HOURS 

TUES.-THURS. 10-6, FRI. 10-8, SAT. 10-5 

1 -41 4-843-3682 

3C ' " 



[WA^' 




DUFFY'S ATTIC 

Antiques & Collectibles 



25% OFF 
All Jewelry 



Buy & Sell 



CLOCK REPAIR 



22 Center Street, Grayslake 
(708) 223-7454 

Tuas.-Sat. 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
Sun. 12:00 noon - 4:00 p.m. 



I 



ie Laktfkind Nowipapors 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



TKf 




ANTIQUES & CRAFTS • ANTIQUES & CRAFS 





•ANTIQUES & CRARS -ANTIQUES & CRARS 



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Dolls have endured for almpst 4^000 years 



Whether considered 
childhood companions or 
cherished collectibles, 
dolls have played an im- 
portant role in civilized 
cultures for hundreds of 
years. 

The tradition of using 
doUs as play- things dates 
back to 2,000 B.C. when 
the ancient Egyptians 
made dolls of wood or 
fabric, some with movable 
joints and extra clothing. 
Dollmaking also thrived 
during the Greek and 
Roman Empires. 

During the 
Renaissance, European 
nobles commissioned 
life-sized doUs, or man- 
nequins, to keep up with . 
the latest fashions. It was- 
n't until relatively modern 
times — and the develop- 
ment of a prosperous 
middle class — ^that the use 
of dolls as children's toys 
found wide acceptance in 
Europe and, later, 
America. 

Today, millions of 
Americans never outgrow 
their enthusiasm for dolls. 
The number of adults in- 
volved in doll collecting 
startedrising about 11 
years ago, prompting a 
sharp increase in dolls 
created specifically for 
this purpose. Primarily 



made of porcelain, these 
dolls are intended for 
display, and many are is- 
sued in limited-edition 
thematic series. 
One of tlie most 




sought-after contempo- 
rary doll series on the 
market is Yolanda's 
Picture-Perfect Babies, 
designed by leading doll 
artist Yolanda Bello, and 
available from the 
Ashton-Drake Galleries. 

Dolls in this collection 
are frequently listed 
among the best- selling in 
the country, and four of 
Hello's porcelain babies — 
"Michael," "Amanda," 
"Jennifer," and 
"Heather" — have earned 
first place in Doll 
Achievement awards from 
the National Association 
of Limited Edition 
Dealers (NALED) in 1991, 
1989, 1988, and 1987, re- 
spectively. 

In addition, prices for 
the sbc doUs which are no 




Craft Corner 

8048 - 22nd Avenue Kenotlu WI 53143 

Sunnyilde Park Sboppinf Ceater 

(414)662-2550 

Qualt/ Handcrafted Creations 

• Spedd Onteis WHconiB • 

Op«n: Mon. thru Thur. « 9*t. TO A.M. to 6 P.M. ft Fri. 10 A.M. to 7 P.M 

10% OFF 

0« ANY REG. PRICED MERCHANDISF 
Umlt On« Coupon per customer, per visit Coupon can nol b« uaed in 
conjunction with any other offer. Coupon expiro* Novemlier 30, 1692. 
Coupon must be presented at tlm» of purchase. 




* 



HILL HOUSE TREASURES 

P.O. Box 53 
Villa Park, IL 60181 

• SILVER PLATE MATCHING SERVICE 

• STERLING SEARCH SERVICE 

Please call Carole Ann for help in finding match- 
ing pieces or adding place settings to your pattern. 

(708) 279-5538 



mmam doix coulectors: 

Carol Brittaln, Doll Doctor from House of Brittain 
doll hospital In tngleslda will be on tiand to re-string 
and access any doll repairs. She will also do doll 
appraisals for a nominal fee. Bring In your doll and 
register for a special porcelain Santa doll to be 
given away on Sunday, December 6, at 3^00 p.m. 

Bring Your Dolls On 
Nov. 7 & 8 from 1 1 -4 

OrDec. 5&6 

For more information, call or stop by 

ARMTROKG'S 
COmTRTCOIWlECnOW 

1757 N. Milwaukee, Llbertyvlllc, IL 
(Just south of Rlc. 137) 




longer in production have 
appreciated significantly 
on the secondary market. 
"Jason," the first doll in 
the series, was originally 
issued in 1986 for $48. An 
August 1991 survey of se- 
lected dealers across the 
country revealed that the 
doll has been selling at 
retail for an average of 
$887. A later doll in the se- 
ries, "Amanda," was avail- 
able through 1988 for $63. 
According to the survey, it 
is selling for an average of 
$133. 

Other artists have 
found inspiration in the 
pages of children's litera- 
ture. For example, Dlanna 
Effner has designed dolls 
based on the boys and 
girls in Mother Goose. 

And fashion still plays 
an important part in the 
contemporary market 
through dolls that capture 
the costumes of different 
eras. Stepping 0«f and 
Yearbook Memories— both 
sculpted by Roger Akers 
and costumed by 
Stephanie Gerardi^are 
two series that focus on 
the clothing and lifestyles 
of yesterday. 

Regardless of theme or 
age, however, all doUs 
have one thing in com- 
mon; their ability to touch 



the human heart. Perhaps 
more than any other col- 
lectible, dolls are acquired 
because of an emotional 



response. Collectors may 
buy a doll because it re- 
minds them of one they 
used to own as a child; or 



it may resemble a favorite 
friend or relative. That's 
why dolls have endured 
for almost 4,000 years. 



Movie classics lend to collections 



America's love affair with 
motion pictures doesn't 
end when the credits roll 
and the lights come up. 
Limited-edition col- 
lectibles inspired by big- 
screen classics have given 
film buffs a way to make 
their favorite movie mo- 
ments last long after the 
final reel. 

Collector's plates are 
one. of the most popular 
limited-edition art forms 
for movie collectibles. 
There are more than 20 
movie-themed series in- 
cluded in the U.S. listings 
for The Bradford 
Exchange for limited edi- 
tion plates. The earliest 
series listed on the ex- 
change began in 1977 and 
featured scenes from "The 
Wizard of Oz." This 
perennial favorite is also 
the subject of a second 
collection: The Wizard of 
Oz — A National Treasure. 

The latter series has re- 
cendy premiered in honor 
of the film's selection by 
the Library of Congress as 
one of the original 25 clas- 



g nfiitiii Annual ^ 

it • Crafts • Baited Goods • Ceramics 

fA 'Stained Glass • Handcrafled Items 

^ • Wooden Toys • Christmas Ornaments J% 

i| Baifoeque Sandwiches Available if 

S Warnren Townsliip Center ^ 

U 17801 W. Washington, Gumee tt 

» (708) 24^1101 » 





^ BIG HOLLOW SCHOOL PRO UDLY 
PRESENTS 

Christmas 

AT THE HOLLOWS 

ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR 

SA.XURDAY, NOVEMBER 7th 
B ajn. to 4 p.in. 

50 GRAFTERS • BAKE SALE • RAFFLE • CLOWN 
• REFRESHMENTS • FACE PAINTING 

BIG HOLLOW MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Rte. 12 & 134, In^eaide, JL 




"^M 



JAY BEE'S ANTIQUE MALL 

MAIN STREET U.S.A. 

5722 6th Avenue 

Kenosha, WI 

Open 7 days a week 

Fridays till 8 p.m. 

DEALER SPACE AVAILABLE 

414-652-1945 



Have Lunch in the Mall 

In or Out Cafe 

10-2 



sics listed as American 
treasures in the National 
Film Registry. 

Other feature films 
which have been captured 
on porcelain plates in- 
elude Oklahoma, The 
Sound of Music, 
Casablanca, Singin' in the 
Rain and Mary Poppins. 

The eternal appeal of 
Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett 
Butler has helped make 
collectibles re-creating 
scenes from "Gone with 
the Wind" among the 
most sought after. This . 
cinematic masterpiece is 
the focus of no less than 
three plate series, the lat- 
est of which is entitled 
"Gone with the Wind: 
Critic's Choice." The ini- 
tial issue, called "Marry 
Me, Scarlett!" shows 
Scarlett and Rhett 
embracing as she 
breathlessly agrees to 
accept his proposal of 
marriage. 

An earlier scene from 
this landmark film graces 
the top of "Scarlett at 



Twelve Oaks," a. porcelain 
music box available from 
Ardleigh Elliott. It depicts 
Scarlett holding court at a 
picnic at neighboring 
Twelve Oaks. Surrounded 
by suitors waiting to carry 
out her every wlUm,- 
Scarlett is glowing with 
pleasure at being the cen- 
ter of attention. Musical 
accompaniment is pro- 
vided by the well-known 
notes of "Tara's Theme," 

In the collectible doll 
category, Ashton-Drake 
Galleries has debuted re- 
productions of several 
characters from vintage 
Hollywood musicals. 

From The King and I, the 
waltzing duet of Anna and 
I the King is recreated in 
"Shall We Dance." 

Unlike more fragile 
memorabilia, such as 
posters and photographs), 
limited edition plates, 
dolls and music boxes 
won't tear or fade with 
time. 

As long as there are happy 
endings in Hollywood, 
there will be collectibles. 



9th linnual Craft Fair at 

Avon Center School 

Saturday, Nov. 7. IQ AN - 4 PN 

Over 40 Grafters 

& Bake Sale 
Santa will be there. 

Located on Rt. 83, just south of 
Rollins Rd., North of Grayslake 





HOLIDAY BAZAAR 

Special Recreation Association of Central Lake County 

rjfh (Formerly MISRA) 

^ Friday. Novombor 13, 1992 

«iP 10:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

^ The United Methodist Church 

429 Brainerd, Liberlyville, IL 

(Directly West of Cook Memorial Library) 

(Jlti • Crafts • Jewelry • Folk Art • Christmas Decorations 
• Raffles • Bake Sale • Refreshments 
NO ADMITTANCE FEE 
Special Recreation Association of Central Lake County (Formerfy NISRA) A 
non-profit organization that offers activities for persons witti special needs. 
For futher info, ptaase call Rosalie (708) 362-7983. 




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(Ql 
(01 
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1$) 
101 

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ANTIQUE ALLEY MALL 

'Open 7 days -11 am 
TttiNK ^^^^ ^' VVashington St.| 
cW^^^l^iS^!^^^^ Lake/lngleside 

(708) 587-0091 

and ^^p* 

Fox Lake Artist Showcase 

Unique Christmas Gifts 

"Duck Decoy Prints • Handmade Silver Jewelry 

•Character Dolls • Pottery • Handnnade Paper • 

jHandmade Ukranian Eggs • HandmadeWood PrimKives] 

Baskets • Cel's • Birdhouses • Marcasite Jewelry 

•Global Jewelry & Jackets* 





"— ' •:. ' .t^ i, • 



^'.:vdxi.j2i^iilt!s:>ai-'*ii:-ii-? 



^-i ■ 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



ELECTION RESULTS 















DISTRICT 

Republican # o* Votes 

Democratic # of Votes 



PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



George Bush Bill Clinton 

DanQuayle Cty. 99.000/31421.293 ^IGore 



Cty.81,693/St.606,110 



Ross Perot 
James B. Stockdale 



Cty. 42,384/St. 1 95,376 



LAKE COUNTY BOARD 



DISTRICT 1 

James Fields 6,858 

DISTRICT 2 

Robert P. Neal ^,688 

Samuel E. Payne, Sr.- . . . .3.992 

DISTRICTS 

Suzl Schmidt ^,783 

Julia E. Edwafds 2.873 

DISTRICT 4 

Jim U Belle ...... .5,509 

DISTRICTS 

Edward A. FojUk . . . .6,084 

Elizabeth 'Beth' Geuzendam 3,672 



DISTRICT 51 

Venia L Clayton ...18,224 

Theodore J. Forsberg . . .7,053 



DISTRICT 6 

Larry Leafblad 3,926 

Robert Boness ..,- 3,258 

DISTRICT 7 

Robert W. Depke . . .7,520 

DISTRICT 8 

James P. Stanczak 4,105 

Bertiia M. Ogrfn . , . .4,267 
DISTRICT 9 

■JeH'Jeffers 2,602 

DebraJ. Halat 3,617 

DISTRICT 10 

Colin L. McRae 5,020 

John P. Reindl .4,110 

DISTRICT 52 

AISaM 31,817 



DISTRICT 11 

nichafd "Dick" Raftii 5,416 

Gall Gioede 4,158 

DISTRICT 12 

Walter J. While 1,274 

Anselo D.Kyle 3,319 

DISTRICT 13 

John E. Schulien . . .4,647 

Jack Cervac 2,872 

DISTRICT 14 

Audrey H. Nbon . . . .2,314 

DISTRICT IS 

Carol Calabresa . . . .8,219 



DISTRICT 16 

Maiy Beattie ..... .6,815 

James Jeffrey Canavan ..1,748 

DISTRICT 17 

Mark H. BaauUen, Jr. ...7.636 

Peter J. Suk, Jr 2,330 

DISTRICT 18 

Pamela O.Newton . .6,181 

UsbethA-Fayer 2,964 

DISTRICT 19 

Robert L Qrever . . .7,717 

Eugene P, Toussaint Jr. . .2,670 



STATE REPRESENTATIVE 



DISTRICT 20 

Arlene M. Genell 5,209 

David B. Stolman . . .5,270 

DISTRICT 21 

Martha Marks 7,967 

Louis Lowenbine 2,307 

DISTRICT 22 

Myron E. Siege! 4,942 

Carol Spiefenan ..;.. 7,193 

DISTRICT 23 

Robert M. Buhai ....8,327 



Lake County Circuit 
Court Clerk 



U.S. SENATOR 



COUNTY 
Richard S. Wiliamson .113,541 

Carol Moseley Braun 93,996 



U.S. REP. IN 
CONGRESS 



DISTRICTS 

Philip M.Cr»e ...51,227 

Sheila A. Smith 32,598 

DISTRICT 10 

John E. Porter 69,219 

Michael Kennedy .43,484 



Lake County 
Recorder of Deeds 



DISTRICT 57 

Margaret R. Parcelis . . . .1,964 
John D. Crawford . . .2,220 



DISTRICT 59 

Virginia RMterFrtifctlek..,. 15,006 

Jc*inS,Ma!ijevich 12,553 

DISTRICT 61 

Andrea S. Moore . .25,074 

Michael J. Com 15,070 



STATE SENATOR 



DISTRICT 26 

William E. Peterson 39.303 

Ann O'Donnell 25,627 



DISTRICT 29 

Roger A. Keats 1,098 

Grace Mary Stem . . .3,650 



DISTRICT 13 

David N. Baikhauien ..J1,308 

Michael Simkin : 24,662 



DISTRICT 60 

Charles A. Cardella . . . .12,232 
Lauren Beth Qash .20,565 
DISTRICT 62 
Robert W. Churchill 23,327 

Grant B. Farrell 13.483 



DISTRICT 31 

Adeline Jay Qeo-Kvis 63,223 

John H.Gordon 21,989 

Barbara Goudeaux .4,266 



Frank J. Nustra . .121,753 

Sally DeadrickCoffelt ...128,887 Jack H. Pilfer 71,302 

Jan L. Bairstow .69.907 



Lake County 
Coroner 



Lake County 
State's Attorney 



Michael J. Waller .127,329 
Barbara E. Richardson . .138,745 Qeraki R. Stalza 67.771 

James a Brophy III 63,591 



JUDGE OF THE I JUDGE OF THE 

CIRCUIT COURT 19TH I CIRCUIT COURT 19TH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

Judgoihip A ■ Judgeship D 



TRUSTEE-NORTH SHORE SANITARY 



DISTRICT WARD 1 

John R. Paxton ,,.. .6,674 

DavkJ Tannenbaum 6,816 



DISTRICT WARD 2 

Marijoan Burke .7,125 

MarkHawn 8,677 



DISTRICT WARD 3 
A.E. "Al" Maehak ...6,245 
DISTRICT WARD 4 
James E. Swarttiout .8,067 



DISTRICT WARD 5 

Loulie Q. Qreenbaum . .14.392 



Raymond J. McKoiki . .139,247 

Shall WIUJAMD. BLOCK be re- 
tained in oHice as JUDGE OF THE 
ClflCUITC0URTl9TH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT? 

YES .112,736 
NO 37,838 

Shall JOHN R. QOSHQAnAN be 

retained in office as JUDGE OF THE 
CIRCUIT C0URT19TH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT? 

YES .116,075 

NO ....35,571 



Henry C. Tonfgan .108,567 

Terrence J. Brady 82,878 

Shall JACK HOOQASIAN be re- 
tained in otiice as JUDGE OF THE 
CIRCU1TC0URT19TH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT? 



YES 

NO 



.111,554 

39,693 



"Quote Marks" 



Big turnout results in long lines 



"The American people have voted 
for a new beginning."— President 
Elect Bill Clinton. 

"I'm going to get very active in the 
grandchild business." — President 
George Bush dunng his concession 
speech. 

"History will record this 
administration's great 
accomplishments." — Vice President 
Dan Quayle. 

"Tonight we have made history; you 
have made that possible." — Carol 
Moseley Braun during acceptance 
speech. 



"When a man is desperate, you never 
know what he might do." — Lake 
County Board Dist. 12 Candidate 
Angelo Kyle on his opponent, Walter 
White. 

"I and judge (Terrence) Brady ran a 
very high-profile race."— Judge 
Henry Tonigaiu 

"Eighty percent voter turnout should 
be the norm, not the exception." — 
Lake County Board Dist. 3 
Candidate Suzi Schmidt. 

"This is the largest voter turnout I 
can ever remember." — ^Lake County 
Clerk Linda Hess. 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lalceland Newspapers 

Presidential elections have 
historically received high voter turnout, 
but this year's election suT)rised even 
Lake County's election veterans. 

The 1992 General Election had the 
largest voter turnout in recent memory as 
a record 271,000 eligible voters registered 
for an election that history could show as 
being one of the most important in the 
20th Century. 

According to Lake County Clerk 
Linda Hess, around 80 percent voter 
turnout was reported from polling sites 
through out the county. 

"This was the largest turnout anyone 



I've talked to can remember," said Hess, 

Lake County Board Member Jim 
Fields (R-Disl. 1) said he couldn't 
remember voter lines like the ones he saw 
in Antioch on Tuesday. ' 

'This was the largest 
turnout anyone rve talked 
to can remember. ' 

—Linda Hess 

"The surprising thing was how 
patient the voters seemed to be despite 
having to wait probably twice as long as 
they are used to." 

Lake County Republican Party 



Chairman and State Representative Robert 
Churchill (R-Lake Villa), who continued 
his annual tour of all the polling places in 
his district by giving bags of apples to 
the election judges, believed that the 
increased voter registration and heavy 
turnout despite sloppy weailicr would hurt 
his party's chances nationally, but firmly 
believed that the party would win key 
local races regardless. 

"When you have such a large increase 
in voter turnout, you can pretty much 
take for granted that the voters want a 
change," said Churchill. "But, that 
increase could also mean that the voters 
arc worried about change, and that is what 
we ho'pcd for." 



Democrats weather the storm 



A year and a half ago, who would have 
thought it? 

U.S. voters opted for the hopes of 
economic and social change over the 
memories of a decisive Desert Storm vic- 
tory and elected Arkansas Gov. Bill 
Clinton president over incumbent George 
Biish Tuesday. 

Clinton's victory ends a 12-ycar stint 
in the While House for the Republicans 
and begins the promise of cooperation 
with a Democrat-controlled Congress. In 
his four years. Bush used 35 vetoes to 
slop proposed Democratic legislation. 

Clinton amassed a projected 339 elec- 
toral votes to Bush's 70. Third-party can- 
didate Ross Perot spent an estimated $100 
million on his campaign but didn't gamer 
any votes in the electoral college. 

The popular vote, however, was much 
closer; Clinton, 43 percent; Bush, 38 pcr- 



ccni; and Perot, 19 percent. 

It was just last year that Bush enjoyed 
nearly a 90-pcrcent approval rating after 
the U.S.-led victory in Iraq. 

Tuesday's results indicate voters are in 
the mood for change and that was the ral- 
lying point of the Clinton campaign. The 
margin of victory may also be Indicative 
of a desire to depart from the conservative 
policies of the last dozen years. 

Through the campaign, Clinton 
weathered accusations of marital infidelity, 
communist sympathies and a using infiu- 
cnce to avoid military service during the 
Vietnam war. 

Bush, on the other hand, was hampered 
by his alleged role during the Iran-Contra 
affair. In addition, many voters apparently 
felt Bush was not responsive to domestic 
issues. . . 

Some of the slates vital to a Bush vic- 



tory lined up behind Clinton.- Illinois, 
Michigan, Missouri, Georgia, Vermont, 
Connecticut, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire and Pennsylvania helped put 
Clinton over the top. 




I;i' 



— ^ m .^■--■«._J I 



I'K U4:* »«.«a >*kfkr ft 



Friday, NovennberA, 1992 



*t;v^aT^3y 



^^m 



Lali:elaiid 



ELECTION RESULTS 



I 



REFERENDAS 



I 
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es 

Robert 
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pics 10 
tiat Ihc 
heavy 
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^'in key 

increase 
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want a 
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m 

Illinois, 
Vermont, 
s, New 
clped put 




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t 



Advisory Question To The Electors Of The 
State Of Illinois 

Should Bw llhoti Qm*nt Auacnbtv, In ortltr U> itop hcraMhs property 
ma* <)u» to unhindtd mutdaitt on foc«l fiovinvntnt, «ppfw« « HMduOoi 
for ■ SUI* ContWJtOful Ain«ntknant ptohlUthg Ow 0«n«ral AitamUv and 
Oovamor rront adopeng n«w untinittd SUt* mindatM till ImpOM aiMrtlonil 
coil* on unit! ol local govMiuntntT 

. YES Cty. 58,885 NO Cty, 71,286 



Question Of A Water Utility For The 
Village Of Beach Parle 

*Stiri fia ViliQa of 8M<ti Parti adopt an ordinanca providing fM a munlc|)il 
tnlar fuppty b mike walat miltiMi to 9» prooaftlM loeatad wHhln tti* 
racUnguiar araa g*n«nly boundad Iw t» North Shora Ucyda paVi on tha 
Waal. Unj Skaal en Iha Notth. Stwridiui Hoad on lia Eaat, DltncMnl Road 
on Iha South, LirVw) povlding titt Sitfa ihil not ba a raqulramant thai 
tatManlil wrila ba cappad, and lUrthar provtdng tial t\» lyitim ahalt not t>a 
paid tot fay tuaHon, Ixjl thai! b« paid fof by tpedal Btaaaamanl on ptoperty 
Dtthh Bie deaeribad araa, payaUa In nol mora han tan annual InaUVnanta d 
•pprtmlmatafv '4IB aach, plui htataKT 

YES -2,233 NO 1.886 



Proposition to Create A Comm. Unit 
School DIst. 

Shall a cMTtTnunlly tu^l Khod dial wlih ainhoiily lo lavy taxet al Iha rata ol 
3S3<% tor aducabonal purpoaat, .738% for oparaHona and milnlananca 
purpoaea and tha putchaae and kmpfovwnenla o( adiool flrounda. .212% foe 
pupi Iran^). purposai and .05% la< Art prmmbcn and salaty puipoaaa, 
eacti t^Kn all Iha laxabfa prqiarfy of (he dial, at tie vatue tiareof, aa equal- 
liad or aiaaaaad by Iha Dapl. ot Revanua, b« aalabllthadl 

YES 6 NO 1 
Proposition To Issue Bonds 

Shall tia Board of Education ol hapcposed comm. unit tctiool diatrld In tha 
tarrttory oomprithg Spdng Grove Sdioo) Oiat. 13, McHenry & Lake ComSaa, 
and Hchmond-Bunon Comm. tHigh School Ditt tS7, McHeriry & Lake Court- 
ttaa, tie authorited lo buld and e<^ilp addllona to the Sp<tr>o Grova Bemen- 
tary Bulling & the FVcfimond Orade Sdiod Buldng & Impme tie allea and 
build & equp. a new high achool buldng and Impme Iha aHa and lo pay the 
COM ttaraol laaua boida In Sw amount ol *1 1 ,500,000? 

YES 6 NOO 

Question to Issue *1, 000,000 Bonds of the 

Village Of Lal(e Zurich, Lake County, 

Illinois, for the Purchase of Breezewald 

Parl( 

EhaJIbcnd* In he amounl of >1. 000.000 ba laauad by tha Vllaga of Lake 
Zurich, tor Via puipoaa ot punliadng Braezawald Park lot uaa aa a piU c 
i»rt( and recreation area and fof aiq>«naea Niddenial thereto aaid eondi 
bearing hlentl il tie rata ot not to aioaed Via great of 9% per amtm or 
12S% ot tie rata tor tie moat recant data itiown In the 20 O.O. Bonda 
Index ot averaga mmldpal bond ylalda aa puUihed In^ie moat recant 
edtxm of The Bond Buyer, ptMlthed In Kaw Yortt, New York al the tina 
Bw eonliact i* made tor the aala of aald txndal 

YES 4p890 NO 2,245 



Question On Dissolution of Beach Parle 

'Shall tfte Municpal Corporation o( Beach Park, Illinois ba 
di«ao)ved7* 

YES 908 NO 3,211 

City of North Chicago Advisory 
Referendum On National Health insurance 

Should tie Stale ot llhola uroa tie Cor>graaa and tie PraaktanI of tie 
UnHad 8tataa lo anad a pumc^ lurtdad rialanal hailt) Inauranoe pro- 
grant that provMaacomprahanalva health care far allditanetrfiUaghhg 
everyone the right lo oiooaa tiatr tnm hoefilai, doctor or otiar haatti 
care protoaalonal? 

. YES3,1d2 NO 635 

City of Parle City Public Question On 
Wards And Aldermen 

Shall tie O^ Cound of Parti City maintain Its piaaent makeup of tk 
aUemanlc aeata tieelad ftom three ward* h Partt City purauant to 'AH 
ORDINANCE MAIKTAININO SIX ALDERMEN ELECTED FRO*^ HR£E 
WARDS IN THE CITY OF PARK CITY- paaeed by tie Park City Coundl 
on Augual 20. 1 9e2,and totown at Ordr anoe leOz-O-OCr? 

YES 019 NO 308 

Village of Riverwoods Question To Issue 
•8,965,000 General Obligation Bonds 

Shal tie Vjlag a ol Rivenraod*. be authorfied lo laaua Ka Ganaral OblN 
gallon Bonda In an amouit not lo exceed '3,0(5,000 to pey the ooai of 
protHdno ImprMamenta lo the wsterwoiha and aanniage anleni ol ha 
Wlage, luch Bonda being gineral M'igalon bonda payaola horn tia 
levy of tuee agalnal all ol the taxable real property induded In Spedal 
Sendee Aiet* numbered 4,5 or 6 ot iha Vllege eaklilthlad purauant lo 
ha Bpadal Service Area Tax Ad ot the Stale of llinoia, aa amended? 

YES 515 NO 1,038 

Proposed Special Service Area 4-Sewer 
Question Of Public Policy 

Shal the Hverwooda South Sewar Spedaf OlcL Number 4 Inalal • 
sanitary tewer tyatem In tte district and pay tie cosb ol the InatanaUon 
from a lax Iwy agalnal al ot tie laiatile real praofMity bxkJded vriiNn 

tvadlstitcr? 

YES 60 NO 233 



Grant Township Public Question 

'Shan Ofanl ToanihIp adopt a recydlng prograjn loi the unticorpo- 
ralad area ot lie lomoH^' 

' YES 3,923 NO 1,644' 

Barrington Park District Public 
Question 

Shal tie Sankigton Parti Dat leqtira out-oMlitrtel parldpania h orga- 
nixad aporta afn ulUie Parii Dfal. a«4mmlng poola or pfaying tafda to pay 
a minnun annuri mambaraNp f*« ol '200 par houaehold, and aald lea 
may ba adjusted annuaiy tar Increased capital and oparaliig ooata i^ to a 
maxtmLrn amouit equal to tw preirloua year's metfan real aatala lax 
paymanl made by a liialdantal household to ha Barrington Parte Otat but 
hat outol-diblci houaaholda afah meal federal andlora alala ciilaila of 
Ung low inooma* houaahdda lia aicampt from ha mambetsHp lea 
reqiirtmanta? ■ 

YES 1,766 NO 700 

Barrington Park District Public 
Question 

Shal atfactva January 1, 1009, any program sponsored by Barrhgton 
Park Dial or an ouhida group or organJiation whidi uaa tw Park OiaL 
swimming poda or ptayhg Mds damanstrats, through reglalared pajttd- 
pani reoordt, hat all paitdpanla are Parte Dial reddenb or membership 
oul-ol-ditilct houeeholda. but that out-ol-<Stlild housahokis «hlch meet 
federal and/or ataie criteria of being 'low Income' houeettolda be aiempl 
Irorn tie memberahip raqulremenf? 

YES 1,4T6N0 923 

Barrington Park District Public 
Question 

Shal tha Barring ten Parti DiiWd. In he Inleraet of adiievjng low btenaity 
recrealonal uae ol Beeae Parti so aa nol to dstuib ha adjaoenl reddantlal 
and nalural mtdile area*, raetiicl at soccer program aclvlliaa to regular 
aeaaon acfwdulee for racrcaticnal aoeoet, and hat all non-recrealorial 
socesr and aoccac toumsm entaataregkmalnslursar tistweeo regions l>e 
pjoMMted? - 

YES 1,396 NO 996 



Wildwood Park DIst. Question On 
Additional Tax 

Proposed Special Area 5-Water Question ^•^ Wldwood Park Oial. be autwrlied lo levy and ooled an addllonal 



Shal he RNenwoodt Norh Water Spedal 01 it Nunbat 5 Inatatl a water 
syalamh hediatiiclandpay he coats ot he InatallatJon Iran a tax levy 
againd all ot he taxable rear property Inciided wrhh he liatiietT 

YES 69 NO 249 

Proposed Special Service Area 6-Water 
Question of Public Policy 

Shall the nverarooda Norh Water Spedal DtsL Nianber InslatI a water 
eystem In he dalrld artd pay he coats ot hetnautlstcn Irom a lax levy 
agahd all of he taxable real property Included wrhh he datrtct? 

YES 233 NO 618 



lax d nsl to exoeed 0.12% lor all oorporsta purposes as provldsd in 
Sacton S^ of The Parte Dlitrtcl Code*? 

YES 1,272 NO 957 

Lake Villa DIst. Libr. Proposition to Issue 
•6,500,000 Library Bonds? 

Shal he bonds of Tht lake Vila' PuMc Ltirsry Diet., In he amount of 
■O.SOO.OOO be Issued lor the purpose of repairing, ramodeing and ImproV' 
Injf ha ariUIng library buldkig of said library DiiL bukjlng and addton to 
a«d ibraiy building, purchaang «id preparhg a site for he same and 
luinlthlng eqiapment therefor? 

YES 3,948 NO 4,512 



Proposition to Increase the Tax Rate For 
Educational Purposes 

Shu he Board ol Edueaton of ll4cHsr ry Comm. CcneoMdad Schod DIst. 15 
be auhorlied to Increasa he tax rale tor educaSonH purposes to 1 M% upon 
aS the taxable properly ol ha DIat aa equUnd or aaseaaed, from he ounant 
auhetlied rale ot 1 .38%? 

YES 15 NO 22 

Proposition To Issue *8,300,000 School 
Building Bonds 

Shal he Board otEdueaUon o* Gavin Sdxid nxrtel 37 demol* he C«iW 
School, Ixjid & equip a new achool buldno on the trie d add achod, ^prova 
add ilta, txild and eajipaddliona lo, Imprt^alhe okit d and allitr wid repdi 
he Norh and South Schools and laaue he bonds d aald Sdiod District to ha 
amount d 'B.300.000 lor add purpose? 

YES 1,313 NO 1,496 
HIghwood-Hlghland Park School 

Shal he Board of Educalon Oiatrid 111, Lake County. Mnds, be autmilzsd 
tolsauebondatoihe amount of '500,0007 

YES 2,080 NO 1,433 

Proposition To Issue *4,500,000 School 
Funding Bonds 

Shal Che Board of Educalwn of he Hound Lake Aree Schoda, Contn]\filf 
Unit Sdiod Dfdricl Nvntnr t Ifl. Lalie County llnois. Issue Undng bonds lo 
he amowil d '4,500.000 tor he purpose ot paying teachers' ordsn^ and 
In tared accrued hereon? 

YES 3,866 NO 2,770 

Proposition To increase The Operations 
And (Maintenance Fund Tax Rate 

Shal Bte Board ol Education d he Round I aka Area Schodi. Community 
Unit Sehod Diitrtd Nimber IIS. Ldia Cowlf, llinoia. Inaeaae he annud 
rateolheopeialonaandmalnlenarKelijndtax Iron .50% to .75%? 

YES 2.896 NO 3,658 

Proposition Authorization For Butler Lake 

School Building Alterations And 

Additions And Bonds 

YES 7,895 NO 11,451 

Question of Incorporating The Arden 
Shore South Fire Protection District 
For Fire Protection DisL . . . .61 

Against Fire Protection Dist 39 

Bonnie Brook Rre Protection District 
Special Tax Question 

Shall he Bonnts Brodi Rre ProecSon Distrtct levy a ^ledd [ax at a rate nd to 
exoeed .30% d he value ol all taxable property within he datiid as equdlied 
Of sseesMd by he Oepaitment d Revenue lor he puipota d providng an 
ambdanoa eervice? 

YES 1,520 NO 2,084 



"Quote Marks" 



"Obviously, each district has to go 
its own v/ay. Ultimately, we still 
believe a unit district is the best - 
plan." — SupL Dr. Ron Erdmann, of 
Richmond-Burton High School and 
Spring Grove Elementary on 
referedum failure. 

"The problem won't go away. We 
have too many students and a 
housing problem." — Supt. Mike 
Maloney of Gavin DisL 37 about the 
referundum failure. 



Women rise nationally, fall locally 



by HEATHER McDONALD 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Nationally, the election year was one 
small step for woman, one large leap for 
womankind, as a female, black woman 
will occupy a senator seat in Congress. 

But in an election year that appeared lo 
be in favor of women, it is questionable if 
women are rising to the top, or falling. 

Carol Moselcy Braun (D) of Illinois 
will be the first black female senator in 
the country, and her inspiration was a fe- 
male black law professor in Oklahoma — 
Anita HiH. 

Braun, and Lynn Yeakel (D) of 
Pennsylvania, said she was inspired after 



Educators show concern 
over amendment defeat 



watching Hill being grilled by an all- 
white, all-male senator panel during the 
Anita Hill-Clarcncc Thomas hearings last 
year. 

Though Braun clinched her Senate 
campaign as a representative of Illinois 55 
percent lo 45 percent, and Barbara 
Mikulski (D) remains Senator for 
Maryland, many other women had lo set- 
lie for "close, but no cigar," 

Geri Rothman-Scrot (D) of Missouri 
lost to Senator Christopher Bond, Lynn 
Yeakel (D) of Pennsylvania also was in 
close contention with Senator Arlen 
Specter (R). 

In stale-wide positions, three women 
ran and two won, however, the change 
was not significanL 

Of the four positions, two have been 
male dominant for years, and not unex- 
pectedly, the men won. The otiier two po- 
sitions have been female dominant, and as 



expected, continue lo be. The one change 
was that a man entered the run for Lake 
County Coroner. He lost, 69 percent to 
31 pcrccnL 

On a more local level, the percentage of 
women elected lo the county board 
dropped 

This election, nine of 14 women run- 
ning were elected to represent iheir 
District on the Lake County Board while 
14 of 25 running men were elected lo ihc 
board. Nine women of 23 positions, after 
the redistricling, represents 39 percent of 
ihe board. • 

Previously, women represented 46 per- 
cent of the board, as 1 1 women occupied 
24 positions. 

There is no dispute that nationally, 
women are becoming more recognized as 
fit lo serve as government officials. But 
locally, is recognition being suppressed, 
or shifted? 



by RHONDA VINZANT 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Local school officials are hoping that 
stale legislators have a clear picture of the 
message Lake County voters arc sending 
ihem in their defeat of the proposed 
changes lo the constitutional amendment 
on school funding. 

'1 hope they realize that people feel the 
constitution already says that the slate 
must provide funding for schools and ihat 
that is part of the reason why the 
amendment went down here in the 
county," said Nancy Pesz, Chairman of 
the Lake County Division of the Illinois 
Slate Association of School Boards. "I 
think people feel that a change in wording 
was simply not necessary as the Slate 
should already be providing funding." 

Pesz says that she feels voters also 
lumcd-down the proposal because of the 
lack of information provided about where 
money for increased funding would come 
from. 

School board "members and officials 
expressed concerned that the legislators 
will translate the public's defeat of the 
referendum into a no votes for education 
programs. 

"The fear is that ihcy will- lake those 
results and say to educational people ihal 



provided for schools,' said Pesz. 
"Education is going to have its work cut 
out in ensuring that state funding docs not 
slip below its current level." 

In Lake County voters defeated the 
referendum by a 54 percent margin with 
71,286 voters saying no and 58,885 or 45 
percent saying yes. The margin of 
approval was greater on the stale-wide 
level with the amendment falling short of 
Ihc need 60 percent voter approval with 
the tally running at just 57 percent of 
voters in favor. 

"The apparent defeat of the Educational 
Amendment places greater importance on 
the work of slate leaders in helping lo 
lessen the impact of the funding crisis 
now ravaging our schools," said Slate 
Superintendent of Education Robert 
Leiningcr. "The funding problems remain 
on our doorstep. Schools will continue 
to fight for what is left over in stale 
dollars." 

"The Task Force on School Finance, 
created by the General Assembly, will 
now have to push forward to finalize its 
recommendations for ensuring equity in 
the distribution of Stale dollars to local 
schools," said State Board of Education 
Chair Louis Mervis, "This goal is further 
complicated by the State's downward u-cnd 
In ofnio ciinnnrt for education." 



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Antifreeze poisoning can kill pets 



One of the seasonal 
problems veterinarians 
face in fall and early win- 
ter months is antifreeze 
poisoning in pets, mostly 
dogs. 

Seemingly innocuous 
everyday substance can be 
and usually are fatal if 
swallowed. Antifreeze 
contains a chemical re- 
ferred to as ethylene gly- 
col. Ethylene glycol is 
chemically an alcohol 
based on glycerol, a basic 
ingredient of glycerin. 



Glycerin or glycerol is 
sweet, and so is ethylene 
glycol. As such it appears 
tasty to who mayfmd ac- 
cess to it Once in the 
body, ethylene glycol 
forms crystals in the tiny 
tubules of kidneys and 
causes kidney shut down. 
The result of this is ac- 
cumulation of metabolic 
waste in the blood, caus- 
ing severe illness known 
as uremia. The patient be- 
comes prostrate, vomits 
and becomes. uncoordi- 



nated. If the amount of 
antifreeze ingested is 
small and professional 
help is given immedi- 
ately, survival is possible. 
Otherwise there is no hope. 

It is very important to 
remember that any spills 
of antifreeze in one's 
garage, driveway or any- 
where else may become a 
source of poisoning of 
one's own or any body's 
pet. Spills should be im- 
mediately rinsed of f with 
copious amounts of water. 



In case of accidental in- 
gestion the pet should be 
rushed to a veterinarian 
for proper care. Let us be 
careftil and save the lives 
of these creatures who do 
not understand the dan- 
ger and may easily fall vic- 
tims of our careless han- 
dling of this dangerous 
chemical.— by DR. 
KRZACZYNSKI, Gurnee 
Pet Clinic 



I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAri 

The Assisi Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT... VOLUNTEER 




Wo don'tdeatfoytiomelesBanlmalal They live their 
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programforthoelderly, provide education programs 
(or young people and otter a special "pet retirement" 
program. THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELPI 



Name 

Address 

City, ST '. ' 

Zip Code 

Please mall to: Asslsl Animal Foundation 
I P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815)455-9411 I 



Individual 

Membership $15 

Family Membership 

$20 

Donation $ 



I 
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III 



G 

Facts & Fancies 

HELPFUL ADVICE 

FROM THE AMERICAN 

KENNEL CLUB 

Warm Weather Care Tips 

Don't let the "dog days" of 
summer afTect your pet's hap- 
piness and health. Summer 
can be a time of great fun for 
you and your dog, providing 
you follow a few simple rules; 





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• Always keep plenty of 
cool, fresh water handy. 

• Make sure if dogs ore 
going to be left outside there's 
plenty of shade within their 
reach. 

• If possible. tr>* not to 
leave the dog alone in the car 
during the summer— <ars 
heat up 30 quickly. If you 
must, park in the shade and 
leave the windows open !«o 
that fre.sh air can circulate. 

• School's out and chil- 
dren are alt around. For every- 
one's protection, be sure that 
your dog is under your control 
or within a secure i-nclosure. 

• Best to visit the vet be- 
fore the summer hugins for 
parasite medication. Check 
daily for licks and tleas. 

• Don't leave the dog's 
food out in the hot weather. 
Bacteria grows quickly. If you 
must leave the food out moke 
sure it's dry food with fresh 
water alongside. 

Consult your vetennarian 
for more warm weather pet 
care advice. 




E 
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All training methods are not alike. Come visit us during classes 
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20970 White Road • Antioch, IL 60002 • (708) 638^523 



Help Curb Pet Over- 
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Spay or 
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Contact: 
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P.O. Box 106 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

708-265-0333 




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Lakoland Nowspop«rt 23 



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GET "IT" OFF 
YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



LIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 13) 

do with Satanism. Somebody out there is all goofed up. 

Leave A Tip II 

I'm calling Lipscrvicc to elaborate about the person who 
called about waitresses and tipping in last week's paper. 
I would like to tell everyone that waitresses make $2.55 
per hour, and we are taxed just like everyone else. At the 
end of the night, we have to tip the busboys, bartenders 
and salad boys. I would also like to say that it's very 
exasperating when a customer takes it out on the 
waitress for the food that comes out of the kitchen or 
the drinks that come from the bar. I would also like to 
say a waitress can either make or break your experience 
in a restaurant, whether it's a truck slop or the Ritz 
Carlton. If you have a favorite waitress, let her know 
and the owner know. I would also like to let everyone 
know. what "tip" stands for: To Insure Promptness. 
When you tip that waitress, she remembers you. 

I'm Not Second-Rate 

I'm from Lake Zurich and I'm sick and tired like a 
second-rate citizen because I want to dine alone in a 
restaurant. Everywhere I go, they treat me terribly. 
However, If I'm with my friends, they treat me like.a 
queen. These businesses in the area should wake up and 
pay attention to the single diner because they're losing 
my business every time this happens. 

Are You The Reason? 

This is in response to "Leave A Tip." Did you ever stop 
to think that these people might not be leaving a tip 
because they don't think they need to? Maybe it's your 
service. Maybe they don't leave a tip because they don't 
think they think they've received good service. Maybe 
you should try smiling or being more attentive to these 
people. By the way, Lip(scrvicc, great job! I love this. 
Keep up the good work and don't drop it out of the 
paper. 



This Is Why 



I would like to add my two cents to "Why Not Fly The 
Flag." Well, when they changed the Armistice Day to 
Veterans Day, a lot of things have happened. We no 
longer stand for one minute and bow our heads in 
respect to our veterans who have given their lives for us 
and our country. It used to be that no matter where you 
were, when 1 1 came around, churches rang their bells, 
trains blew their whistles and sirens blew. Everything 
stopped for one minute. But what can you expect when 
we no longer have flags flying at our school grounds 
and children don't salute the flag and don't say the Pledge 
of Allegiance? 

Give Me A Break 

I'm from Round Lake. Thank you to Lipservice, we 
enjoy it very much. In response to the person and the U 
year old who are afraid of Halloween and all its ghosts 
and goblins: you should be ashamed. I wonder if they 
are Ihc same ones who leave the children home and go 
to work, or don't believe in Christmas, Easier or voting. 
These holidays have been around even before our 
beautiful America was discovered. 



Don't Prompt! 



I have a comment to make and I don't think I'm the only 
one who feels this way. After reading the current 
Lipservice of Oct 30, there's three articles in there 
about Halloween being a Satanic cult holiday. It's 
obvious that it's all written by the same person. If a 
child did make that call, he was coached by his parents. I 
am not a Satanist, but I think it's adorable to see the 
kids put little costumes on. I definitely think they 
should be supervised and candy should be checked over. 
I'd rather have them trickor-trealing than go around and 
getting in b'ouble and damaging things. I don't see 
anything wrong with it. The only thing that is wrong 
are the weu-does who do give them bad things. Satanic? 
No way. 

Burned Up About Leaves 

I am very concerned about the smoking that's going on 
in the Round Lake area. Why is it that Grayslake is able 
to have vacuuming of the leaves, and Round Lake has 
smoking every day of the week? There are people who 
are allergic to the smoke from burning leaves. They 
have to breathe this, day in and day out and become ill. 
I've been wondering why Round Lake won't break out 
with the money to hire people to come out and vacuum 
them up. 

What About Them? 

I'm just calling that I was unable to attend the Grant 
High School homecoming game diis year because I had 
to work, but I was able to see it on the television from 



our local cable company. I'm glad they made remarks as 
to who the king and queen were. However, I wish they 
could show a little of the band, or the queen or the 
court. 

Who Benefits? 

I know that this will be printed after the election is over, 
however, it's not a moot point Regardless if the 
referendum is passed for Liberty ville High School, 
several things are certain. The school is overcrowded. 
Trailers are no place for kids to be learning. They belong 
in classrooms with the best available materials. To hell 
with the politics angle. These arc our kids we're talking 
about and they deserve, as a matter of responsibility, 
better than what we had. They deserve the best It's not - 
their fault that they arc stuck in trailers, it's ours! We are 
the ones who never voiced the opinions at school board 
meetings. Hey, we never showed up, and neither did 
you. It's not their fault they have to meet in crowded 




Lakeland 

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rooms and receive less attention; it's oursl Instead of 
taking, taking, and taking, we should give. If the 
referendum didn't pass, we have nobody to blame except 
for ourselves. If it did pass, we have taken a step in the 
right direction. The next step is to attend all board 
meetings and make sure the board puts the money where 
it belongs. No, we don't need all of that fluff. What we 
do need is a classroom for our kids. Let's be responsible 
and attend the meedngs and make sure that we know 
what is happening in Libertyville. If the board comes to 
us again, at a later date, and asks for more money, 
should know what is going on. We should attend those 
meetings. 

No Competition For Bob 

'Hi. I'm from Lake Zurich and I think it's a shame that 
Bob Grever didn't have any competition. I think that if 
he had some real competition, he would have lost. Next 
(Continued on page 53) 



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Sclerotherapy is performed by 
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Discoloration and bulging 
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Find out if sclerotherapy is for 
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24 Lakofand Nowspapors 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



^n^iVWWWP 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



GCHS, Condell 
offer screenings 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-8161 



When parents of 
Grayslake Community 
High School students at- 
tend parent conferences, 
they will also be able to 
have their health checked. 

GCHS and Condell 
Medical Center will be 
teaming efforts to offer 
blood pressure screening 
and health questionaires 
from 7 to 9 p.m. Nov. 10. 

The service will also be 
offered Nov. 18, 1 to 9 
p.m. The effort is part of 



National Education Week, 
Nov. 15-21. . 

Both screenings, which 
will also feature question- 
aires, arc free. , 



Attend college 

Dennis and Jennifer Grube 
of Grayslake are students at 
Central Methodist College 
of Fayette, Missouri. Both 
are juniors, Dennis is pre- 
law and Jennifer is a busi- 
ness administration major. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that the Safety Committee of 
the Grayslake Community Park District will me.et 
bimonthly on the first Wednesday at 6:00 pm at the 
park office. The meeting dates for the remainder of the 
fiscal year will be November 4, 1992; January 6, 1993; 
March 3, 1993 and twiay 5, 1993. 

The Grayslake Community Park District Is subject to 
the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act 
of 1990. Individuals with disabilities who plan to attend 
this meeting and who require certain accommodations 
in order to allow them to observe and or/participate in 
this meeting, or who have questions regarding accessi- 
bility of the meeting or the facilities, are requested to 
contact Sue Lombardi at (708) 223-4404 promptly to 
allow the Grayslake Community Park District to make 
reasonable accommodatiorrs for those persons. 

Gene Ryshkus, Chairperson 

Safety Committee 

1192A-170-GL 

November 6, 1992 



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PUBLIC NOTICE 
ANNUAL TREASURER'S REPORT 
FOR THE FOX LAKE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 
■ FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MAY 31. 1992 
REVENUE SUMMARY: Property taxes $517,622 - 
Replacement Tax $3,410 - Interest $16,172 - 
Miscellaneous $1,181. TOTAL REVENUE: $536,385 

COMPENSATION SUMf^ARY: Gregory Banser 
$2,250 - Richard Bernard $1,125 - Jack Frost $1,625. 
TOTAL COMPENSATION: $5,000 

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY: Village of Fox Lake 
$361,773 - Fox Lake State Bank $190,142 Nometa 
Landscape $15,788 - Volunteer Fireman's Insurance 
$4,847 - Washington National Insurance $4,599 - 
Richard Balrstow $4,526 - Commonwealth Edison 
$3,792 - Dam, Snell and Taveirne, Ltd. $3,000 - f^lorth 
Shore Gas $2,192 - American Hotel Register, Inc. 
$1,528 - Ken Schaefer $1,500 Howard Johnson $1,320 
- Sutter Hut, Inc. $1,155 - AH disbursements less than 
$(1,000) $62,960. TOTAL VENDORS: $659,122 
SUMMARY STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
(Excerpted from Comptroller's Report) 
Beginning Fund Balance; General $36,351; Special 
Revenue $54,949; Capital Projects $235,972; 
Revenues; General 187,835; Special Revenues 
200.284 ; Capital Projects 150,266; Expenditures; 
General (186,973); Special Revenues (199,684); 
Capital Projects (277,465); Ending Fund Balance; 
General $37,213; Special Revenue $55,549; Capital 
Projects $108,773. 

Subscribed and sworn on this 27th day of August, 
1992. 

Gregory Banser 
Treasurer 
I, Jack F. Frost 
Secretary of the Fox Lake Fire Protection District, 
Lake County, Illinois, do hereby certify that the above Is 
a true copy of the Annual Treasurer's Report for the fis- 
cal year ending May 31, 1992. 

1192A-165-FL 
October 6, 1992 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAMECERTIRCATE . 
NAME OF BUSINESS: by 
George! 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 19 N. 
York St., Fox Lake, IL 60020 
NAME(S) AND POST OF- 
FICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: George L. 
Becht, 19 N. York St.; Fox 
Lake, IL 60020 

STATE OF ILUNGIS 
COUNTY OF UKE.M 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s] to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
locatlon(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
George L. Becht 
October 2, 1992 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, t* 

The foregoing Instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to con- 
duct the business this 
October 2,1992 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Joyce J. Rabey 

Notary Public 

Received: Oct 14, 1992 

. Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County CIeii< 

1092D-141-FL 

October 23, 1992 

October 30, 1992 

November 6, 1992 



- PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Home Improvement Sendees 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 366 
Heather Ave, Grayslake, IL 
60030 

NAME(S) AND POST OF- 
FICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: James G. 
Lasak JR., 366 Heather Ave, 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, ss 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
James G. Lasak 
October 22, 1992 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, ss 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to con- 
duct the business this 
October 22,1992 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Deputy County Clerk 

Comm. Exp. 12-1-94 

Received: Oct 22, 1992 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

1092E-151-GL 

October 30, 1992 

November 6, 1992 

November 13, 1992 



bor 6, 1992 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Number: 23788 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestic and foreign subsidiaries 
and foreign branches of Lakeland Community Bank located in Round Lake Heights, Illinois 
at the close of business September 30, 1992. Published in Response to Call of the 
COMMISSIONER OF BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1 . Cash arKi balances due from depository institutions: 

a, Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 1 ,074 

b. Interest-bearing balances 597 

2. Securities 5,648 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 

a. Federal funds sold .83 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell 1 ,000 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables; 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 12,773 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 105 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

d. Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 

(item 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) " 12,668 

5. Assets held in trading accounts 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 173 

7. Other real estate owned 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets . 

11. Other assets 235 

12. a. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 11) 21 ,478 

b. Loss deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j)(from-Schedu!e RC-M) 

c. Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 21 ,478 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 18,658 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 1,694 

(2) Interest-bearing 16,964 

b. In foreign offices. Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBF's 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 

15. Demand notes Issued to the U.S. Treasury 

16. Other borrowed money 

17. Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases 

1 8. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

19. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits 

20. Other liabilities 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 

22. Limited-life preferred stock 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock 

24. Common stock 

25. Surplus 

26. Undivided profits and capital reserves 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums of items 23 through 27) 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES. LII^ITED-LIFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 
EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 21, 22. and 28) 

I, Robert C. Thompson, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this 
report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

Correct-Attest: Robert C. Thompson 

Geralds. O'Sullivan. 
John T. Colomer 
Robert R. Chodil 

Directors • . „ _. ^ . .^, „«u ^ 

State of ILLINOIS, County of Lake, ss: Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30th day 
ofSept, 1992. My commission expires July 23, 1995 .„ „, . „ . ,. 

^ Yolanda V. Camanllo, Notary Public 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) 

1192A-169-RL 

November 6. 1992 



2.606 

2,000 

19,105. 






51.299 



2,543 







2,784 

628 

80.965 



80,965 



71,668 











63 
18.721 




600 

1,650 

507 



2,757 

21,478 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Number: 1 6352 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestic and foreign subsidiaries 
and foreign branches of FOX LAKE STATE BANK located in FOX LAKE, Illinois at the close 
of business SEPTEMBER 30, 1992. Published in Response to Call of the COMMISSIONER 
OF BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES ol the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1. Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 

b. Interest-bearing balances 

2. Securities 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 

a. Federal funds sold 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 51 ,788 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 489 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

d. Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 
(item 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) 

5. Assets held in trading accounts 

6. Premises and lixed assets (including capitalized leases) 

7. Other real estate owned 

8. Investments In unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. intangible assets 

11. Other assets 

12. a. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 11) 

b. Loss deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. ia23(j)(from Schedule RC-M) 

c. Total assets and losses deterred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 8,951 

(2) Interest-bearing 62,717 

b. In foreign offices. Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBFs 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 
.15. Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 

16. Other borrowed money 

17. Mortgage indebtedness and obligalions under capitalized leases 
IB. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

19. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits 

20. Other liabilities 

21 . TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 

22. Limited-life preferred stock 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock 

24. Common stock 

25. Surplus 

26. Undivided profits and capital reserves 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums ol ilems 23 through 27) 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES. LIMITED-LIFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 
EQUITY CAPITAL (sum ol ilems 21. 22. and 28) 

I. Daniel A. Caravello. VP/CONTROLLER, of the above-named bank, do hereby certify 
that this report of condition Is true and correct, to the best ol my knowledge and belief. 

Correct-Attest: Daniel A., Caravello 

KENDON T. BIRCHARD 
JOHN A. BENSON 

DIreclors ^ , ,. „, i. 

Slate ol ILLINOIS, County of McHenry, ss: Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th 
day ol Oct, 1 992. My commission expires 6-1 0-1 996 

Priscella Beilz. Notary Public 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) 

1192A-166-FL 

Novembers, 1992 





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438 

72.906 

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180 

7,731 

148 



8,059 

80.965 



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RESTAURANT 
& LOUNGE 



Tues. & Thurs. - Cheese & Sausage Ptzza $3.95 All You Can Eat 

Wednesday • Spaghetti $3.95 Alt You Can Eat 

Friday - Baked Haddock $9.50 

Saturday - Jumbo Shrimp $9.95 Cncludes soup & solad bar) All You Can Eat 

Call For Additional Dally Special Information 




8^ UagkttlkatWnhA 
*^ ltu$katBtckgmun(r 

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kanqi:kt 

lACIMTIlCS 
For t.'p to ISO IVtutli; 

■ Wi;(Iiliiifl« 

■ |{(;lirar>4iil DiniiLTM 

•Aiiiiivcr^urii'H 
■UirthiluyM 



,720 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Giiniec 

For [iiformntioii & 

Rcservfttioiis 
Call 336-3166 




In-Laws a great place 
to meet, eat anytime 



No matter whether it's breakfast, 
lunch, dinner or in-bciwccn, there's always 
something good cooking at The In-Laws, 
720 N, Milwaukee Ave. in Gumce. 

A refurbished interior and a rcvamixKl 
menu will please the eye and the palate. 
The new look is the result of an ambi- 
tious remodeling project, which includes 
beautiful stained glass and all-new carpet- 
ing. 

It's the food, however, that makes The 
In-Laws one of the area's most popular 
eateries, and the new menu has taken it a 
step further with the best of the taste- 
tested, plus some new ofTcrings. 

Joining the long list of appetizers are 
jalcpcno peppers stuffed with chcddar 
cheese, breaded and deep-fried. 

Once a Fridays-only special, baked 
haddock dinners are now available every- • 
day. A new entry is the butt steak dinner. 

Oriental stir-fry dishes — with a 
choice of beef, chicken or shrimp — arc 
now part of the featured fare Thursdays, 
Fridays and Saturdays. 

Saturdays are also the lime for the 16- 
ounce prime rib dinner special for $12.95 
and the all-you-can-eat jumbo shrimp din- 
ner for just $9.95. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays, all-you-can- 
eat cheese and sausage pizza is just $3.95. 
Wednesdays, it's all the spaghetti you can 
handle for $3.95. 

A long-standing favorite at The In- 
Laws is the sumptuous salad bar. It's 



loaded with over 30 light, fresh and 
healthful offerings, including two hot 
soups, bagels, pasta salads and much more 
It's all you can cat for just $3.95. The 
salad bar is only $2.55 when purchased 
with a sandwich and is included with din- 
ner selections. 

Full-dinner favorites include several 
varieties of fresh fish, ribs (prepared in a 
homemade honey sauce), pork chops, a 
16-ouncc T-bone, clam strips, deep-fried 
scallops, a honey chicken platter and Vcal 
Parmesan. 

Pizza — thin, double-decker and pan 
— is a speciality of the house. Chccse- 
and-sausage pizza is always available by 
the slice. 

Wine to go with any meal and a good 
collection of beers on lap are available 
from the fully stocked lounge, which is 
open until 2 a.m. on weekends. 

The folks at The In-Laws have put an 
added emphasis on breakfast, and their de- 
licious morning repast is available seven 
days a week. 

The In-Laws seats up to 150 cus- 
tomers and welcomes large groups to its 
banquet facilities for weddings, rehearsal 
dinners, business meetings, anniversaries, 
birthdays and other special occasions. 

The hours are Monday through Thurs- 
day from 7 a.m. until 1 1 p.m., Friday and 
Saturday from 7 a.m. until midnight and 
Sunday 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. Call (708) 
336-3166. 




i*2."«Ofla 

jSpecialty Pizza 

I Good thru Nov. 20," 1992 with this coupon only. | 

I Excluding "RJ's Special". Not good with any other offers. l 

I DINE-IN ♦ CARRY OUT ♦ FREE DELIVERY | g 



■JFtoTi 




(SOB, 

Mexican, 
Super Italian, . 
3 Cheese, etc.) : 



$3.00 OFF 
ANY LARGE PIZZA 




RJ's Eatery 



t 
I 

& Th« Outback Barip 

1913 E. Grand Ave. ♦ Lindenhurst J q 

In 




Phone 356-2300 

Opon Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.; Sat,*Sun. 8 a.m. 



I 



DOUBLE DECKER ♦WINCgySTtPAMPIZZAj I 



On Route 83 

Just North of Rollins Rd. 

Round Uko Beach. IL 

(708) 223-7010 



Limit one coupon 
per visit. Coupon 
not valid with any 
other special or 
promotion. 

•Dine In •Carryout* 
•Delivery* 

EXPIRES 12/31/92 



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NEW CHILDREN'S MENU! 

EntraQS availablo to all childran UKtor 
10 yrs. ohMvailobts 7 days a wmK 

ONLY $2.50 



TRY OUR GRAB-A-CUW SPECIAL 

Ewy Mon-Tnur «dd 1/Z lb. rf Crab t^ja 
w/Cltw to any EntrM ONLY $4,9$ 
or M/2 lb. Cr^ Logs JiClaM ONLY I11.9S 
Add 1/2 lb. more Crib tor tUO 



i BeEntertaUied 
• WhlkYouDine! 

Friday tc Saturday Evenings- > 
' Nov.6ai&7th 

KEN PHELPS teams up with 

Paul Gastor and Chef Ron ^ 

Skowtobrlngyouyour # 

favorite tunes whfle you enjoy 

one of the Longhorn's 

fantastic speciaTentrees. 

Please rrake a 
reservation for this 
special weekend at 

The Longhom! 

815-385-9869 

Opan tor lunch M'F 
Olnnsr 7DayBAWMk , 
Sunday Bninch 



B16 W. RuMJ Rd.^UloHMiy, IL 
On Rt IIS' ImlM WMftm. 11«n 

(015) 3e5-9Se9 




Steak Houae 



^CN^ °?(2^^ ?l«fa«ranf Sc ^Banquet 

/'tvint^'^^ /W\, Gracious dining in the Wesley Scars Esuic 

^Lt3^ IN THE MANSION 

V*^ FULL 7 COURSE DINNERS 

• Roast Turkey • Leg of Lamb • Baked Ham 
also ehoose/rom our regular menu 

IN OUR BANQUET ROOM 

Groups of 6 or more onlyl 
f WE CARVE HIE BIRD FOR YOU / YOU CARYE HIE BIRD YOURSELF 

Call for more information 








. We'll slice and carve tlic bird In our kitchen or cm-c ll younclf at 
'• your table. Your rcfrigcraior docsn'l go hungry either - all the 

Icflovcts arc nrcfully picked to take home. 



Your hosts, Bill & Kris Govas 
(708)223-0121 



InlcrMtlioru li«. 1 20 ft 4$ 

Gn)-Uikf, Illinois 

25 minulH i*iy fromTouh)' A Edriu 



I 




RESTAURAMTiBAR 

OPEN DAILY 11A.M. 

SUNDAY 9 A.M. 

92Q S. Mllwauhoe Ave., Ubertyvillo, IL 

(708) 367-0021 




NIQHTLrY SPECIAI^ 



TUES. 

BBQ 

RIBS 

$10.95 



WED. 

SNOW 
CRAB LEGS 

lib. 

$9.50 



THURS. 

PRIME 
RIB 

aooB. 

$12.95 



All dinners Include soup, 
salad & potato 



FRI. 

JFrcah Deep Pried 
Lake Perch 

$8.50 

BBg Back Ribs 

With Sauteed 

Shrimp 

$9.95 



SUNDAY BREAKFAST BUFFET 
. ^^ 9 a.m. -1:30 p.m. . _ __ 

$4.50 Adutts $3.00 Kids 



5 



.BELDEN FA»mT RESTAURAIirr 



TRADITIONAL 

THANKSGIVING 
FEAST 

Whole Turkey Dinners Served Family Style 
Groups of 6 or more 

Complete Dinner -Soup thru Dessert & Beverage. 
Come and enjoy a truly great Thanksgiving dinner in 

the elegant atmosphere of our Dining Room. We 

carve the Turkey at your table and carefully pack your 

leftovers for the trip home. 

!pT3«95 Adults, Children $8.95 
In addition: 

• Cornish Hen • Roast Leg of Lamb 

• Baked Ham • Long Island Duckling 

• Roast Sirloin of Beef ,• 1/2 Chicken 

Other entre^ available from 9>0.95 

5572 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL 
12:00 NOON TILL 8:00 P.M. 

(708) 662-2929 

; MAKE RESERVATIONS 
EARLY!!! 
^ Open 6:00 a.m. 
HIl 10:00 p.m. 




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Friday, riovomb^f o,,l,9W 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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Lake County 
Assn. of Realtors 
win three awards 

The Lake County Assn. of Realtors 
were the recipients of three awards at the 
Illinois Assn. of Realtors awards 
luncheon in Chicago. The association 
received an award for RPAC 
Contribudon, and also won second place 
in the 1992 Community Service Award, 
Large Board, Multiple Projects category, 
for work with Habitat for Humanity and 
PADS. 

IDOT contract awarded 

The Illinois Dcpt. of Transportation has 
awarded a road contract for the removal 
and replacement of a deck structure on 
Rtc, 59 over Rollins Road and Melra 
Railroad. The contract was awarded to 
Wabash Asphalt Co., Inc of Mt. Carmcl 
for $2.9 million. 




Kindergarten Children from Peppermint Stick Child Care costumes toured Grayslake businesses, on Friday. 
in Grayslake trick-or-treat at Lakeland Newspapers with Photo by Dan Becker 
their teacher, Miss Margaret. Children dress In an array of 



Through hard work, home is where the heart is 



At 2 p.m., Nov. 8, Habitat for 
Humanity Lake County will dedicate the 
house it built at 2819 Gilboa in Zion. 
This is the third house built by Habitat in 
Lake County. It was sponsored by a 
group called Libertyville Builds '92, a 
group of seven churches which supplied 
the funding, labor and coordination for the 
entire house. 

In alicndancc will be Zion Mayor Billy 
McCullough, ministers from the seven 
sponsoring churches and the many of the 
volunteers and donors who conu-ibulcd to 
the house. 

Future homeowners Bill and Dec 
McLaughlin and their three children will 
be on hand to receive the key to their 
house as well as several gifts. 

The house on Gilboa represents 
Habitat's first effort in Zion, 

"Wc welcome Habitat with open arms. 
They help people \yho may have already 
given up" on the American dream," 
McCullough said. . 

Habitat for Humanity Lake County is 
an ecumenical. Christian housing 
ministry which builds homes using 
volunteer labor and donated materials. The 
houses arc sold at no profit and no interest 
to people who would not otherwise be 



able to afford a decent place to live. 

Area churches that joined together to 
supply all of the funding, labor, mi^lerials 
and coordination for the project include 
Grace Lutheran Church, Holy Cross 
Lutheran Church, First Presbyterian 
Church, United Methodist Church, St. 
Joseph Catholic Church, Libertyville 
Covenant Church and Libertyville 
Evangelical Free Church. ' 

"We started planning for this project 
early this year and were asked to have it 
finished by December. The consUiiction 
started in July and Bill and Dee and the 
kids will be moving (into the home) in a 
few days. We're happy .that we got it done 
early and brought it in ahead of schedule," 
said Ron Hammer, project manager for 
Libertyville Builds '92. 

Julie Donovan, executive director of 
Habitat for Humanity Lake County was 
also very pleased with the effort 

"Wc give Libertyville Builds '92, the 
city of Zion and all of the volunteers and 
donors a big 'thank you'." The house on 
Gilboa would not be standing without the 
tremendous effort of these churches, 
donors and the city working ,in 
partnership. Wc look forward to 
continuing partnerships such as these to 



aid in providing housing for the people of 
our county," Donovan said. 

"Pretty soon we'll be in. We can't wait. 
The Habitat 'people have been really 

'The house on Gilboa 
would not be standing 
without the tremendous 
effort of the churches, 
donors and city* 

^ Julie Donovan 



great." said Bill. The McLaughlins will 
move into their house, a three-bedroom 
ranch, and not have to worry about 
accessibility. Their previous apartment 
was inaccessible to their son, Raymon, 
who uses a wheelchair due to cerebral 
palsy. 

Donors to the project include Alcoa 
Building Products, Aldridgc Electric, 
American National Bank, Antioch 
Flooring, Apollo Portable Toilets, Baird 
and Warner, Benjamin Obdyke Inc., 
Browning Ferris Industries, Bunzl 
Building Supply, Carpet World, Casey 
Nursery, Great Lakes Naval Training 



Center — CBU 4-1, Chicago Area Building 
Specialties, Color Comer and Color Tile. 

Also providing assistance were 
Electricians Local Union 150, Elite 
Growers, Emergency Services and 
Disaster Agency, Eric Christcnsen, 
Franson Landscape, George Necve and 
Sons Excavating, Harrigan Distributors, 
K&A Graphics, Ken-Crete Products, 
Kirschoffcr Truck Service, Lake County 
Grading, Libertyville Rotary, Leader True 
Value Hardware Store, Local Roofing, 
Lois Joyce Realtors and Lutheran 
Brotherhood 8799. 

In addition, donations were received 
from McClure Engineering, Mercury 
Plumbing Supply, Midway Supply 
Company, National Building Materials 
Distributors Association, Norsian Inc., 
. North Chicago Iron Works, and the 
Plaster's and Cement Mason's Union 
Local 362. 

Also helping were Rollcx, Royal 
Fabricators, Sam's Club, Schrocder's 
Nursery, The Scigle Family Foundation 
and Scigle Home Building Center, The 
Signcry, Synnestvedt Nursery, Tapper, 
Taylor Drywall, Thomas Shedden and 
Assoc, Weber Sheet Metal, and Wilson 
Nursery, 



WHERE 

TO EAT 

OUT 



vmiocsi 



OPEN 

24 HRS. 

FRI.& 

SAT. 



FAMILY RESTAURANT 

Recession Fighter Speciols 

Lower prices on 
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner • 

Monday thru Friday 




Holidays not Included 

IFv^SSiEIRollins RdSl 
Rounds l^l(»IBjeiacN 1 

(708) 223r0404el 



ENJOY SUNDAY BRUNCH 



Served 10 o.m. - 2 p.m. 



Under 



Adults »8.95 Children '4.50 n 

•Hot Entrees •Belgium Waffles 

•Entrees for the 'lighter' appetite 

•Ice .Cream Desserts "Fresh Fruit (In season) 

•Omiettes made to order 

•Homemade pastries •Varied appetizers Including 

•Smoked Salmon -Salad 8c Fruit Bar 

•Compllmentar/ Glass of Wine 



Entertainment by Carl Rotti 




IMRCOBYCLIl 



(015) 676-2631 



S419KonothaS». 
Richmond, IL 



iit.i7xieik.iaitotet.ia 



It 



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Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Sunday Brunch 9-2 
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Mon* Night Football 

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Featuring 
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(formerly of Longhom 
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EDGEWATER 

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blocks, then led.) 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



lQk»}^f\<:^^mw^i!ap!V^2^ 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



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^ Joanne doing, a 
burn-out before a run 
at Great Lakes 

Dragaway ,4 
in Union ; ' 

Grove, Wis. 



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LIFE ON THE FAST TRACK 



• The JOED 
Racing Team:, 

Ed Ddwsoa 

Joe Bqstuga, 

Marcle Bastuga^ 

Joanne 

Dawson, 






Doanne Dawson used to clean the boats while her 
brother and husband drag raced at Blarney's Island. 
It didn't take long before she asked for a drag boat of 
her own. Some 10 years later, Joanne is the one in 
the driver's seat, this time behind the wheel of a top 
alcohol dragster, and brother Joe Bastuga and husband Ed 
are behind the scenes as the mechanics. 

Joanne became the chosen one of the three fast-track 

enthusiasts because she had the fastest reaction time. In 

simple terms, reaction time is the fraction of a second that 

it takes a racer to hit the gas after "go. " 

"In the American Drag Boat Association (ADBA) I had 



by CLAUDIA M. LENART 



one of the fastest times. The giiys were not real happy 
about that," said Joanne. 

But the three, together with Joanne's mom Marcie 
Bastuga, cooperate as a team now — JOED Racing Inc. 
After a number of years the men eventually realized that 
maintaining the racing vehicles and racing them was too 
stressful. So they left the driving to Joanne. That was when 
they were still racing boats. 

Wauconda residents Joanne and Ed were introduced to 
drag boat racing by Joanne's brother, Joe. Joanne was in 
her early 30s then, an average age for the sport which 
requires an above average income. Every Thursday they 
would race at Blarney's Island with the Northern Illinois 
Drag Boat Association (NIDBA). 

Joanne and Ed got very involved in the NIDBA with 
Joanne serving as secretary and Ed as president They trav- 
eled with the association to races around the country and 
made many good friends. "Still, some of our best friends 
are from the NIDBA," said Joanne. 

But after about five years, they decided it was time to get 
out. 

"We lost a lot of friends in crashes; if not killed they were 
hurt. We realized just how unsafe boats were," said 
Joanne. 

Joanne said boat racing has safety devices. The racers 
wear fire suits and lead shorts and a parachute is attached 
to the life jacket to pull the racer away in case of a crash. 
But, Joanne still felt it was too dangerous. 

"When you hit the water at speeds of over 200 mph, it's 
like hitting a concrete wall," said Joanne. 

So they sold the Jaoats and quit racing for about five 
years. Joanne said that was tough; she really missed the 
racing. 

"When racing is in your blood, you're hooked," said 
Joanne. 

Joanne and Ed still participated in drag racing as specta- 
tors and they made use of the time off by investigating 
other types of racing. 

Finally, they decided to get back into the sport, this time 
it would be aicohol dragsters. The Dawson's were attract- 
ed to the alcohol dragsters for the speed, nearly 250 mph, 
and the relative safety. The driver Is strapped in, inside a 



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cage. They bought a turn-key, state-of- 
the-art dragster from a man in Herscher, 
111. 

However, none of the team members 
had ever raced a car before. So, Joanne 
was sent to Frank Hawley's The Drag 
Racing School in Florida for three and a . 
half days of intensive training. 

^^^Jow, not just anybody who buys a 
I k 1 Idragster can quality to get into 
I ^ ' I Hawley's training school. One of 
l^klthe requirements is that you had 
HHlto have raced a car before. Joanne 
got by this requirement due to her boat 
racing experience. 

"Boats are actually much easier to race, 
but car racers think that boat racers are 
crazy. He figured If I can handle a boat, I 
can handle a car," said Joanne. 

The class started with six students, five 
men and Joanne. But along the way, three - 
of the men In the class were asked to step 
down to a lower level. 

Joaime spent this past summer practic- 
ing. " I wanted to make a lot of passes so I 
could get comfortable," she said. Joanne 
said it was a good summer of learning. 
She got her license just last week. 

Joanne said that some of the attributes 
needed to be a race car driver include, 
fearlessness, aggressiveness and competi- 
tiveness. 

She may be fearless, but she still gets 



nervous before racing. "I'm a nervous 
wreck until I start that engine. Then I 
become calm^ relaxed and focused," said 
Joaime. " You have to be somewhat ner- 
vous, but you have to respect the car. It's 
almost 2,000 horsepower. You've got to 
realize this is serious business." 

And of course it's also a very thrilling 
business. Joanne described what it's like 
to be behind the wheel and ail strapped in 
tight in an alcohol dragster. 

"When you leave the line and hit the 
throttle, you feel a force of 4,000 G*s of 
pressure throwing your body back. For 
the first 100 feet you don't know too 
much. It's an awesome rush, unbelievable 
. . . When you get done, there's an incretU- 
ble feeling of exhilaration. You want to get 
back in and do it all over again." 

Drag racing season is over now, but that 
doesn't mean the crew will take a break 
for five months. Ed and Joe will spend the 
winter checking and repairing all parts of 
the alcohol dragster. Another major pro- 
ject will be remodeling the semi-trailer 
which serves as the dragster's garage. 
They'll be putting bathrooms and sleep- 
ing quarters in the trailer. 

Joanne's winter activity will be to seek 
out sponsors for JOED Bacing. Right now, 
the team has one sponsor, Kendall Oil, 
where Ed works as a sales representative. 
The more sponsors the team can fmd, the 
(Continued on page 33J 



2f Icfkoland N0wspap«ft 



li ji .«k Ji 511 Hm Htupi n 2'^ fMOjft November 6, 1992 . , - f J >- 



Friday, Novombjir ti,. 19W 




RiiiitepP^ii^ 



BERE'S ANOTHER 

MONEY-SAVING 

FEATURE FROM 

FOX LAKE FORD 

MERCURY. 





#2070 



1993 MERCURY TOPAZ* 

Ve, Auto. Affi. Pwr. Lc«*, Bwr D**rotL PWf. 
Window*. AM/FM C**M<t«, 

roroo«:v;;;.v;.v.v;!!^o5 you pay 
fo«)'reb*te-::::::::::::s $4 4 Q776O 

a REBATE tJO*- 1 liOf f 

■" • vAnnOUNGING-THE' 
. MERCURY WITH 
BIG SAVINGS FOR 
MONTHS TO COME. 



1992 MERCURY TRACER 4 DR. 

AjuIo 0¥«rdrfw, AWFM titno, te, pi; p*, 
r«vd*(rott 



A H»w Car AltBmnthfm At 

•7,439"* 



How to raise your level of 
style without lowering 



your standard of living. 



1992 MERCURY SABLE LS 

MSRP Haw Wm '20.830. VS Add Pwr. (Ml 
pwr. window*, cttMit*, rMt dtfog. cniM, eil 

A Mew Car AHamatlva At 



#2048 




1992 RANGER 4X4 

XLT THrn, AWFM cina. owMdrtv* Um*^ 
AUffU cuMtw, hiding rtw (i«Mow. 

WAS '15,377 
NOW 



#936 



H 1 ,928='° 




1992 AEROSTAR XLT XTD VAN 



XLTTilffl, Pwr. Eqiip Qroup, VS. Auto., tie. 

caM«tt*,C«llf.St[l|n. 



WAS •20,524* 



lOO* 



CARS 



■80 TAURUS 2X 4 DR. 

39.000 nMlw WOW.»eyl.,»t.*/e.p«, 
pb, pw, r', iVvenl, Ut, ciUh, euMtIa 



■SBT-BIRD. 

WMt«. ted, Vetuw hlwlar, digital d«h, 
p/MQ^ t}oti ad«>. •quollrar, iMdad. 



•83 OLDS CRUISE WON 

No rmX, nmt (rood 

*1 983 

'92 MERCURY QRAND 
MARQUIS 

4 Dr.; If gitat duh. VS, at. a/c, p«, pd, 
tilt oulso, pw, pi, pa, l««lhM 

*16,988 

'92 TEMPO QL 

4itr.,a^ate,pi,Fb 



TRUCKS: 



■89 AERO STAR XL 

T paaa., S cyl., »i,*/e,lH. cntm, *■ 
r«r, 43.000 miin 



■87 CAD. SEDAN DEVILLE.. 

ALow52^«»rnii«,d.«j,eu.toi>»o< 191 MERCURY MARQUtS 

t*11«.l«ih«r.wanV.»t -,, id,,b,M.if^p,.pl>.H<.cnJM,p-,pl 

: •11,988 

■87 CADicOUPE Um^ -^JS^SiS^i^: 

D.bkia, tac<iilliei,mii;p,1oad»d ' '20,000 miM ' 



'B6 HISSAN STANZA 

Fomiy Wgn. & economy, al. a/c, pa, 
pb.Otif 

•4488 

'66 PONTIAC PARISIENNE 

4 Dr., Load«d 



'90 TEMPO 

4 dr., at, a>e, pa, pb, 31 ,000 mlsa 



'92 DODQE DAKOTA 
SUPER CAR LE 

7,000 mito.. 'O^t.J^. < •'cp«, (*. IBB EiaO COHVERSiON 

*H9 Onn -'>■'■ ^ ■ VAM . ■ 

-^^■900 SHvar Qmy, captain chain Va,pw,(il, 

' ■ ^ Bc,lilte(ui»«boaida 

•91 EXPLQRER EDDIE *' 

BAUER 

4 dr., 4x4, CD i^ayar, 6 cyt., at a/c, pa, 
pl>. pw, pi, Ht eni le, Uu* 

* 17,488 

•91 SfQ BLAZER 

- '4 Dr., 4x4 iffvarMillB, 33,000 mllaa, 
ligltiri daatrTlbb rad(. alow whooti, 

- ■, ' ' J-^^JOn'l laat 

*1^f988 

'91 F150 XLT 

Short bed, black, m cMm, 20,000 
miloa, (umtig boanla, a/c, pi, pb 



'88 RANGER SUPER 
CAB XLT 

Oactric bii«, a/e, pa, pb, til. 
ciulaa.eap 



■88 FORD E190 WORK 
VAN 

vs. al.a/cpa,pb 



■86 BRONCO II 

au0tanXLT4x4.EdiiABaiMt 
(BEST BUY) 



«1 1 ,988 *5988 



■90 T-Bf RD 

Rod and (sady, loadod, loeenlliiBa 
94 



'90 FORD E180 WORK 
VAN 

WHiB woM budt, 6 cyl„ at, pa, pb, dura 
■nor 



•68 BRONCO It XL 

Wilts 4x4, 49,000 milea, ecyt., 
cnilaa, racorri Via* & brakei 

»1 



•85 BUICK CENTURY 
LTD. 

4 dr., cyl., alirgr, prsaat p.w,, pi., a^e, 
bn, cnijes, loaded 



'85 MAZDA RX7 

Kiri Car, Rad^ 
>-Sp««d, tie 



'90 FORD CROWN VIC. 

4 dr., dk red, 27,000 mllat, kiadad, at, 
tie, pt. pb, pt, ft, pn, HI, c)us« 

«10,988 

■90 FORD FESTIVA 

2 dr., r»d, 4 qrf.. automal c Uona. 
(special THIS WEEK) 



■90 XLT F1 SO TRUCK 

Cassette, 8 cyl., S opeed, a/e, pa, pb, 
bit, aula* 



'87 DODGE CARAVAN 
LE 

Btfk ' Woody, t'o^ w*ieel drive. Go 
tttni tie anow 



Colloctar Sport Car, Red, Loahar, 



■64 SAAB 900 Turbo 4 dr. 

QJue, At, oc, pa, pb 



■89 ESCORT 

Rod, 2 dr., S Speed 



<89 PONTIAC 6000 

4 dr., white a gnat car, Ut, al, a/e, pa, 
pti, caasette, crulaa 



'64 CHEV. CHEVETTE 



■84 COUGAR 

Dladt beauly, S cyl., power window*, 
cacaens 



'86 OLDS CUTLASS 
CIERA 

4 Dr., 25,000 nilaa. at. a/c, HI. eniaa, 
•iatao, gdd 



■90 FORD XLT F280 

Va, Jtfnbo tliaa. chnxna irftaaif, d-ied, 
■ dandy 

*1 1 ,988 

'90 QMC SIS 4X4 

30,000 mlaa,, Load«d,Scyl.,atniool, 
gypiy phg, Uadi baauty 

*1 4,688 

'90 AERO STAR 

Exttfidad van XLT, 36.000 m lea, S 
cyl., at, lit, pa, pb, pw, pi, lit eiUaa 

MO,988 



'87 F150P.U. TRUCK 

Blue cap, S eyi., S apead, oharp 
SJ 



'BS CARAVAN 7 PASS. 

Front wtieel drha 

'»4988 

•85 QMC S18 PICKUP 

6 qfl., at, pa, pb, cap, blue runa 
good 



•84 BLAZER S10 

6 cyl,, at. a/c, pa, pb, Triio, d-bnnn. 

tan Inteifor 



'84 BUICK CENTURY 

4 dr., cyl., at, a/c, pa, pb 

9 



■88 DODGE DAYTONA 
SPORT 

2 dr, Uadt b«auty, pi, pb, a/c, tit 
Ciuwe 

*4988 



'90 FORD CLUB XLT 

Hard to Bnd, Va!V«dei^tly«r, 33,000 

mite* 



*1 3,988 



•69 F150 XLT TRUCK 

S cyt., a/c, pat pb, Hi cnito 




IN..THURS,-9.9..ji 






90 S: ROUTE 12 



FOX LAKE • The anchor of Hottlicrii Illinois • 



708-587-3400 



'SiS^m +SPL Purchase Cars 'Just^ndd^tax, jic.,^oc *40 All Appl. Robato s Includoii. ; 




fare 



Willy Wonka and the 
world of chocolate 

The Papal Players welcome you and the 
entire family to share in a delicious adventure 
with "Charlie it the Chocolate Factory" being 
performed at Cutting Hall, 150 Wood Street in 
Palatine, opening Veterans' Day, Nov. 11 
though Jan. 2. 

Performance times arie 10:30 a.m., Wed. 
Nov. 11; Sat. Nov. 14; Mon. Dec. 28; Tues. Dec. 
29 and Wed. Dec,, 30. OnNov. 18, the perfor- 
mance Is at 10 ani. Decl 27tiie show begins at 
■ 2p.ih. ;■• _ ^■■^■^■•'- '/' 

Ticket price is $5. Reservations are request- 
ed by calling 359-9556, . 

The "Charlie" cast includes twelve adult 
professional performers from the greater 
Chicagoland area who will portray spoiled 
brats, greedy, naughty children and "oompa 
loompa" elves who because of their misbe- 
havior eventually turn into a blueberry, tum- 
ble into a chocolate river or meet with some 
strange fate. These characters enjoy torment- 
ing and distracting the benevolent, but slightly 
bizarre, Willy Wonka who because of his pas- 
sionate love of chocolate, ingeniously invents 

secret recipes for the delicious chocolate „ . _ ... 

"wonka bars" and. "everlasting gobbstoppers." K«^" Peterson as "WllJy Wonka." 
The good-hearted Charlie, in the end, gets to enjoy the rewards from discovering the last 
of the five "golden tickets." 

Dick Reynolds makes music 

Veteran musician "Dick Reynolds and his Harmonica" will perform at Stage Two's 
Super Saturday children's show on Nov. 14. Harmonica music, songs and stories will 
highlight the program. Performances will held at 10 am. and 11:30 am. at the downtown 
Waukegan theater. All seats are $3. 

"Anyone who has ever had the pleasure of meeting Dick Reynolds knows that he's dou- 
bly talented. Not only is he a proficient harmonica player, but his kindness and sensitivi- 
ty to others — especially children and the physically or mentally challenged — exemplify 
the very soul of the music he plays," stated Stage Two Managing Director Michael 
McStraw. "We're very pleased to welcome Dick Reynolds and his harmonica to our 
stage." 

Reynolds' show is a fast moving program with a variety of acts aimed at keeping the 
audience etichanted and involved. Audience participation is a key element in his perfor- 
mance. 

Stage Two is located at 12 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan in the newly renovated 
University Center. Entrance to the theater is from the city parking lot off Sheridan Road 
between Washington and Madison Streets. For reservations, or for more information, call 
the box office at 662-7088. 



60s Flashback 

Go back in time and experience the 1960s at Kohl Children's Museum, Nov. 10-13. 
Kohl Ctiildren's Museum Is located at 165 Green Bay Road in Wilmette. For more infor- 
mation, 251-6950.— by RHONDA VINZANT 





the night . . . 



Friday 

Simple Simon, progressive college rock, comes to Whitewater, 345 Northwest 
Hwy., Palatine, 705-0130... Elvis Brothers play favorite oldies at Shades, 21860 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Deerfietd, 634-BLUE... Southern Strut struts its stuff at Sundance 
Saloon, Routes 176 and 83, Mundelein. 

Saturday 

Black and Blonde is at Slice of Chicago, 36 S Northwest Hwy., Palatine, 991- 
2150.. .Kenning and McCoy is at O'Traina's, 110 Main St., Wauconda, 526- 
4499... Savoy Brown is at Shades... Hello Dave, Bud Battle of the Bands winners, at 
Whltewater...Southern Strut at Sundance Saloon.— by CLAUDIA. M. LENART 

Clubs that would like to be listed in the Into the Night column should contact 
Claudia M. Lenart at 223-B16L 

Calling all jazz musicians 



The David Adler 
Cultural Center hosts 
monthly jazz Jam 
Sessions. Anyone who 
plays any style of acoustic 
jazz is welcome to join 
other jazz musicians for 
an evening of playing for 
and with each other. 

The house will be 
open to jazz musicians on 
the second Saturday of 



each month from 8 p.m. 
to midnight with the next 
session scheduled for 
Nov. 14. There is no 
admission fee. 

On this fall's Open 
Stage the house is open to 
all who care to share their 
music by performing, 
playing along with others, 
or just listening in. The 
next sessions are sched- 



uled for Nov. 13 and 20 
from 8 p.m. to midnight. 

The evening usually 
begins with an informal 
"sing-around" and shar- 
ing of tunes. At the same 
time, musicians are fee to 
"jam" together in other 
areas of David Adler's 
historic home. 

For further informa- 
tion call 367-0707. 



,4 j.L II tt:cno i iiFrlctoryr-Novombof 6, 1992 



* J i 



= Lakekmd H9Wipap«n 29> .i ^ 



^HIQay, Ngx«!fncwi o/^imrjc 




eland Leisure 



■ 'Images' 
A Watercolor Show by selected mem- 
bers of the Lakes Region Watercolor 
Guild will be presented on Friday, Nov. 
6 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Cunco 
Museum land Gardens, 1350 N. 
Milwaukee Av., Vernon Hills. Jury 
Judges are Marlko Ventrua Flood and 
Suesl Hart, award juror Is Helen 
Sneider. Admission is S4 per person for 
the preview only. The show will be 
throughout the Museum and will con- 
tinue until Dec, 3. Call 362-2Q25 for 
' , Information. 

B 'N» B 

Bachelors 'N' Bachelorettes Square 
Dance Club invites all single square 
dancers and couples to the Nov. 6 
dance to be held at the Johnsburg 
Community Club, 2315 W. Church Sl, 
Johnsburg. Round dancing begins at B 
p.m. with cuers Tim and Sue Lippold. 
Square dancing from 6:30 to 11 p.m. to 
caller Jack Berg. For information call 
(815)344-2747 or 362-0130. 

Buoys and Belles 

The Buoys and Belles Square Dance Club will 
be sponsoring "Name That Tune" dance on 
Friday, Nov. 6 at First United Methodist 
Church, 128 N. Utlca SL, Waukegan from 8r30 
to 11 p.m. with a Round Dance Workshop from 
8 to 8:30 p.m. and a Plus Tip at 11 p.m. Bob 
Wilson calling squares and Ellssa and Bob 
Pfschke cueing the rounds. For Information call 
Fred and Emma Jeffries at 662-6546. 

Cojmmunity dance 

A community barn dance sponsored by The 
David Adier Cultural Center will be held on 
Saturday, Nov. 7 at the American Legion Hall, 
715 N. Milwaukee Ave., LIbertyville at 8 p.m. 
Maria Terres-Sandgren and Friends with Pat 
Pluketi as caller. For information contact Sara 
Farr at 367-0707. 



Assisl Animal Foundation 

The first annual benent dinner/ dance for the 
Assisi Animal Foundation will be held on 
Saturday, Nov. 7 at the Crystal Lake Country 
Club. Live music of the Bob Cropley Orchestra 
and cocktail hour with piano entertainment 
and a silent auction will be offered. 
Reservations a musL Call Ms. Dcnzier at 951- 
•3222 for time and information. 

* Joy of Art' 

Claire Copping Cross will present the 
latest program in her "Joy of Art" Series 
at Gorton Community Center, 400 E. 
Illinois Rd., Lake Forest on Wednesday, 
Nov, 11. The program will run from 
7:30 until 8:30 p.m. with a fee of SIO 
and include slides, lecture and discus- 
sion on England's southern gardens: 
The baroque architectural masterpiece 
Blenheim Palace, Slssinghurst Castle, 
Penshurst Palace, Great Dixter and 
Gorscfleld House. Register before 
Friday, Nov. 6. For information call 234-6080 
between 9 a.nxand 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

I Orchestra opens 

The Waukegan Symphony Orchestra 
I will open it5 1992/93 season at 8 p.m. 
on Saturday, Nov. 7 at the Waukegan 
High School, 2325 Brookside Ave., 
Waukegan. Season package available 
that represents a $10 discount off the 
regular ticket price. The economical 
package includes each concert per- 
formed by the orchestra and chorus 
[during the 1992-93 season. For infor- 
mation call Debbie Rakcstraw at 360- 
' 4742. 

Brass band concert 

The Illinois Brass Band will present a concert 
on Nov. 8 at 3 p.m. at the First Presbyterian 
Church, Douglas Ave, and W. Maple Ave., just 
west of Milwaukee Ave. and Rte. 176. 



4i ,j .-^ 



Come to 
Fox Lake 
Fire Dept. 
& Rescue Squad's 

US VEGAS NIGHT 

Friday Nov. 6th 

,-tJ^^ 6 pni til midnight ^A^_ 
-^O^b OVER & UNDER '^cS^* 

^ Refireshinents Available 

Join the fun at the Bingo 
Hall on Washington St. 

All proceeds to benefit the Fox Lake Fire Dept. & 

Rescue Squad. Permit #CG286' 




Libertyvilte. Tickets can be purchased at the 
door. Adults 57.50 and students/seniors $4.50, 
For Information call Dick Daugherty at 816- 
2500. 

The King and r 

Zion Chamber Orchestra presents 
"The King and I" featuring the Premier 
Players and directed by Pat Jamison on 
Friday and Sahirday, Nov. G, 7, 13, 14 , 
20 and 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Christian 
Arts Auditorium, ZIon, Ticket prices are 
adults S7.50, senior/students S5 and 
children under 12 S2.50. For Informa- 
tion call 872-4803. 

'Chess' 

"Chess" will be the 19th production 
with Music on Stage and the beginning of Its 
exciting 35th anniversary season. Performances 
are Nov. 6, 7, 8, 13 and 14. at 8 p.m. and 
Sunday matinees at 3 p.m. Tickets are S12 
Friday and Sunday and $14 on Saturday. For 
reservations and Information call 991-5990, 

'Frankenstein' 

The Waukegan Community Players presents . 
"Frankenstein" on Nov. 6, 7 at 8 p.m., Nov. 8 at 
3 p.m atBowen Park. This classic tale of horror 
and suspense, adapted from the book by Mary 
Shelley, details the iU-fated experiments of 



young Dr. Frankenstein as he attempts to fath- 
om the secrets of life and death. The play 
blends moments of brooding terror and sud-' 
den shock with questions of morality and the 
dangers of unrestrained scientific Inquiry, 

Classical Sweets 

The Stage Two Theatre, 12 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan presents "Classical Sweets'* a world 
premiere comedy by Dennis Melonas on 
Thursdays through Saturdays, Sunday matinee 
on Nov. 15 and Nov. 22. Thursdays 7:30 p.m., 
Fridays and Saturdays at B p.m. and Sundays at 
3 p.m. Prices for Thursdays is pay what you 
want, Firdays and Saturdays are $10 for adults, 
Sundays SB adults and Friday • Sunday, 
Seniors/students/ military S7. For information 
call 662-70BB. 

'Sound of Music' 

The "Sound of Music" plays now through 
Jan. 24, 1993 at Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre, 
Ten Marriott Dr., Lincolnshire. One of the best 
loved musicals of all lime is presented by Kary 
M. Walker, executive producer. The Sound of 
Music is directed by Dominic Mlssimi and 
choreographed by Eric HolL Performances are 
Wednesdays at 2 and 8 p.m.; Thursdays, 
Fridays at B p.m. and Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 
p.m. and on Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. 
Reservations can be made by calling 634-0200. 



IChicken dinner and bazaar 

Millburn Congregational Church, Rte. 45 and Grass Lake Rd., Mltlburn will hold the 93rd 
(Annual Chicken Dinner and Bazaar on Friday, Nov. 6 at 2 p.m.. They will feature fancywork, 
Ihomemade candy, bakery goods and garden produce. Dinner will be served at 4:30, 5:30, 
[6:30 and 7:30 p.m. Reservations only. Donations for dinner is S7 for adults and $3.50 for chil- 
Idren through hi^ school age. Call 356-5237 between 9 a.m. and noon, or anytime 662-3901 
land 395-7013 for information. 

'Candy Cane Lane' 

The Millburn School P.T.O, is sponsoring their 4th Annual "Candy Cane Lane" craft bazaar 
Ion Saturday, Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m Admission is free and they are accepting dona- 
Itlons of canned or non-perishable food items. School is located at 18550 Millburn Rd., 
IWadsworth. For information contact Lynne Mark at 356-3221. 

(Continued on page 31) 

8 The Sabatini Family Since 1947 S 

g FRIGATE RESTAURAIirr | 

On Long Lake 

I Semor Dksiikg Savkstgs! 

g EVERT 9IONDAT & TUESDAT! 

.J^A ^ Your Choice of 6 different 

Chefs Specials ■- 

Each entree includes complete salad bar, 
homemade soup, fresh vegetables, rolls and 
butter, dessert and beverage. 




Complimentary CocMall 
With Each Senior Dinner 

HOURS: 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. 
Monday &. Tuesday 



THURSDAY 
Southwestern Buffet 



5:00 - 7:30 '5. 



95 



587-3211 



Reservations Now Being Taken For 
Senior Holiday Parties 






(Patricia's 

AMISH 
FURNITURE 

cfr* Qiftwarc 
395 Lake St. • Antioch 
. -^ 395-4780 
^V^KComptete Lino of Solid Oalt 
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We Feature 
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207 W, Peterson Ave., LIbertyville 



m2ii!Ssfm,vm^9isr 



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p if;Tfiir?3r^ff«v. 



Friday, November *i,, IW2 



,-i,-ZJWiSrtaevii,-*U 



(Continued from page 30} 

Potliick 

Christian Singles will have a pot luck for Christian Emphasis Night at Caivary Temple, 450 Keller 
Ave., Waukegan on Saturday, Nov, 7. A Billy Graham video "Caught" will be shown. Bring a dish to 
pass. For information call Gertrude Vardeman at 662-0354. 

Fall luncheon 

The fall luncheon of the Lac Des Illinois Chapter of the National Society Colonial Dames XVII 
Century will be held at the Deerpaih Inn, 255 E. Illinois Rd., Lake Forest on Saturday, Nov. 7 at 11:30 
a.m. The program "Ins and Outs of Colonial Inns" will be given by the Illinois State President, Mrs. 
Victor G. Marty. For inforniatlon contact Norma Flude at 358-4143. 

* Christmas bazaar' 

Seniors of the LibertyvUle area will be holding their annual "Christmas Bazaar" on Saturday, Nov. 7 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.nt There will be hand crafted items, bake sale, raffle and "Granny's Attic." The 
Community Senior Centet" is located in the Liberty Towers Housing Unit, 130 E. Cook Ave. in 
Llbertyville. For information call 367-8210 Monday though Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 

Understanding Schizophrenia 

"New Perspectives in Understanding Schizophrenia" will be discussed in a one-day seminar at the 
College of Lake County on Saturday, Nov. 7 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the blue lecture hall, A-162 on 
the Grayslake campus. Cost is S45 general admission and S25 for members of the Alliance for the 
Mentally 111 (AMI). Cost includes lunch. For information and registration call 249-1515. 

'Artistry in Wood' 

More than lOOwoodcarvers will exhibit and sell their best works at "Artistry in Wood,*' presented by 
the North Suburban Carvers from 9 a.m, to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 7 and Sunday, Nov. 8 at the 
Chicago Botanic Garden, Lake-Cook Rd in Glencoe, one-half mile east of the Edens Expressway. 
Woodcarving demonstrations will be held hourly between U a.m. and 3 p.m. on both Saturday and 
Sunday. Vendors will also be selling "how-to" books, wood, tools and other supplies for the novice 



and advanced woodcarveri Admission is free and parking Is $4 per car. For information call 835-5440. 

Model Railroad Club 

The Lake County Model Railroad Club, 107 S. Main SL, Wauconda will host its 20th annua! fall open 
house this Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 7 and 8 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. Admission isfree. 
Visitors will see several trains operating simultaneously along the Wauconda Central Railroad, one of 
the largest model railroads in the Midwest 

Entertainment '93 books 

The Lake County Extension Foundation Is currently sponsoring the sale of Entertainment '93 dis-. 
count books, including the North and Northwest editions. The boolcs offer a wide range of discounts 
on fine and casual dining and various savings on movies, special events, activities and merchandise. 
Cost of the book is S35. Sample books can be viewed at the University of Illinois Cooperative 
Extension Service, 100 S. U.S. Hwy. 45 in Grayslake, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4:30 
p.m. Orders must be placed before Nov. 30. For information call 223-8627. 

Dolls donated 

Three antique adverstlsing dolls were donated to the Lake County Forest Preserves' Lake County 
Museum by the Lake County Doll collectors of Illinois. The dolls will be added to the Museum's 
Wendy A, Wright Advertising Doll Collection. For information call 526-7878. 

Christian Women's Club 

The Northwest Suburban Christian Women's Club November luncheon will feature a holiday and 
career oriented fashion show by Hit or Miss of Lake Zurich on Thursday, Nov. 12 at Concorde 
Banquets on Rand Rd., just north of Quentin in Kildeer from noon to 2 p.nn. The cost is SIO and 
babysitUng is free. Call Renate at 359-4751 or Ruth at 382-1529 for reservations by Nov. 9. 

'Recognition of '92 Achievements' 

The public Is invited to attend "Recognition of '92 Achievements", an open house on Thursday, 
Nov. 12 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the University of Illinois Cooperative Extension Service (CES), 100 S. 
U.S. Hwy. 45 In Grayslake. This event is aimed to acquaint the public vrith new staff members and 
the newly created Grayslake Extension Center. For information call James Betustak at 223-8627. 



GRAYSLAKE t:; 



SUHDiOr 

Nov^ 8 8:00 ^M.-4tOO R.M. 

l^ke County Fairgrounds 

GreysiakeJL 

IL120&US45 . 
ADMISSiON $24t^ 

Lake Couhtijr Pioiiibtlbns 

RO.Box4«1 
Grayslato^lLMoiw 

708/223-1433 or 708/356-7490 




Johnsburg High School's 

2nd Annual Craft Bazaar 

"A CHRISTMAS CAROL" 

Saturday. November 14, 1992 

9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. 



Johnsburg High School 

2002 Rlngwood Rd. 
Johnsburg. QlJnols 60050 

Admission: $t,00 .jt 

(includes ticket (or *^' 

Oooqxiie drawings) 




Children 1 student 
are FREEI 




WHITE ELEPHANT A 
BAKE SALE ALSO! 

Doorpriie drawings 
Bvory 15 minutest 



Over 50 craftei^l 






All pnc»»d» twiMfff Ut»Jr.Ctt»0 Pmm 




I This Is The Place! 

I 
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Terrific Sub Sandwiciies 

SUmENTt&N 

Terrific SubSandwiches 
Just Off Green Bay Rd. Near Pizza Hut 
We Take Other Coupons Lunch/Dumer Delivery 

473-1088 



Tips for picking up tlie 
relatives at the airport 

by JIM WARN KEN, PRESIDENT 

NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

It's that time of the year again. The folks will be fly- 
ing In for the Holidays and you get to pick them up at 
the airport. Here are some suggestions to make that 
task a little easier. 

Always call to contimn arrival time unless you enjoy 
sitting at the airport waiting for a flight that's coming in 3 
hours late. You can either call the airline reservation 
number or any friendly travel agent. Don't call any earli- 
er than an hour or two before arrival time, f^ost flight 
delays are not reported any sooner than that. If you're 
going to meet Aunt Martha at the gate, ask for the 
arrival gate number to save some time. 

Please keep this next tip to yourself or it will lose its 
effectiveness! 

Whenever I have to pick up someone at O'Hare, I tell 
them to meet me outside the ticket counters on the first 
level of the temriinal. That's the departure level where 
you normally drop someone off. It's much less crowded 
and the men In the blue uniforms are more tolerant if 
you have to wait a few minutes for your passengers. If 
you are asked to move along, just follow the signs 
directing you around the recirculation route back to the 
terminals. 

I also make it easy for my passengers to find my car 
by tying a purple ribbon on my antenna. Remember, 
purple is my color -- you've got to choose your ownl 

Lastly, limo companies will pick up the visiting rela- 
tives at the airport for the same price as you may have 
paid the last time you took one to the airport. For an 
additional charge,some will even meet them at the gate. 
So if no one wants to make the trip to O'Hare, take up a 
collection and charter a limo. 

Next week I'd give you some tips if you're the traveler 
this holiday season. 



/irmtmsniif rmaysi we. 



2234 E. Grand Lindenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded aargains - 356-2000 

(708) 356-301 



1- 




Lx/e ShAh Series 

Join us for the Life Skills Series of lectures on issues facing people in 
today's world. Tliese educational lectures are free and so is the parking! 
Refreshments provided. 

Helping your child achieve in school and in 
social situations 

November 18. 1992 7-8 p.m. 
Presented by: 

Susan l\/tay field. Ph.D. 

Staff Psychologist 

Saint Therese l\/ledical Center 

Few things are as frustrating and agonizing for parents than to see their 
children struggle with school performance problems . Academic 
underachievement problems are quite common and can sometimes mask 
underlying difficulties such as learning disabilities, depression or anxiety. 
Finding the right solution depends upon understanding the cause. Dr. 
I\4a^field has many years experience in helping children and adolescents 
achieve to their potential, and will help parents understand the ways in 
which they can help with academic and social problems. 

Dr. May field is a staff psychologist with Saint Therese l\/ledical Center, and 
is in private practice with Lake-Cook Psychologists in.Lake Bluff. 
Bannockburn and Arlington IHeights. 

For more information or to register, call ASK-A-NURSE" at 244-5900. 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



A Division of Francison SIsicrs Heillh Care Corporallon 



2615 Washingloti Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 
Telephone 708.249.3900 



1009 



!Ff)cfcnt. NflW^mbw 6/1992 



Idkakind N«Sivipdp«n 31 




Kel World 



Seagal king of action pics 

With Sylvester Stallone on a bloodless hiatus trying to prove he can act as well as fight, 
and the crown princes of action, Bruce Willis and Mel Gibson into other than shoot'em- 
up flicks, Steven Seagal ascends to their bloody ttirone. 

His latest rock .'em, sock 'em effort, "Under 
Siege," is also his best film to date. In this one 
Seagal plays a Navy cook on board the battle- 
ship the USS Missouri with an unlikerly CIA 
background and talents. We hear that most of 
the battleship shots were done on another ship. 

Tommy Lee Jones and Gary Busey are the 
bad guys and two of the best villans to assault 
the big screen as of late. 

All the action, generously laced with a bit of 
comedy here and there, is concerning a soon to 
be decommissioned ship carrying nuclear mis- 
siles. 

The special effects are just that, especially 
, effective, and director Andy Davis brings the 
suspense to the same heights as some of the 
best pictures of this caliber. 

You won't fall asleep in this one as Seagal, 
like most of our trigger-happy heroes, comes to 
the proverbial rescue of not only the ship's 
crew, but the free world entotal. 

Patrick O'Neal plays tlie ship's commander 
with his usual cool nasal authority.^ 

We give this one five out of five stars for 
pure captivation.— by GLORIA DAVIS Steven Seagal 




Current Movie Ratings 

"Last of the Mohicans" — 4.5 stars" "Honeymoon in Vegas" — ^3.5 stars 
"Glengarry" — i stars "Sneakers" — 3 stars 




Phillip E. lUIfller 



I make house calls. 

Call for a free, r)o obligation appoinfrr]ef)t today. 

Ask for Phi 

Stocks ■ Bonds ■ IRAs ■ Mutual Funds ■ Annuities 

yiXxEdmirds 

^ mVESTMnnS SNCZ J8S7 

■ 231 Main Street • Woodstock. IL 60098 

(81 5) 338-2550 anim^^&ews 






'Lost in Younkers— not a collection of oddballs 

Neil Simon's cfiaracters have their 

ov/n peculiarities and quirks. But 

when they open their mouths or 

prance about on stage, as they do in 

his latest comedy, "Lost hi Younkers," 

they consistently come to life as both 

interesting and real people — ^not sim- 
ply a collection of oddballs. 
Simon goes back to 1942, and all of 

the activity takes place in a quaint littie 

flat above the Kurnitz candy store. It's 

easy to forget one is in Chicago's Royal 
George Theater. 

Grandma Kurnitz is the key figure: a can- 
tankerous, imperious old woman whose dom- 
ineering ways have somehow scarred each of 
her grown children. The plot revolves two 
young grandsons left temporarily with their 
grandmother while their hapless but deter- 
mined father takes to the road to scrounge up 
enough cash to work off his late wife's hospital 
bills. Marji Bank is superb as the German 
grandma who has made an art of keeping her emotions in check. Peter Regis-Civettaand 
Grant Gelt, full of spit and sass, play the boys. David Darlow is the caring fathen Karia 
TamburreUi, the lovable but intellectually challenged aunt; and Joe Guzaldo, a small-time 
mobster on the lam. Under I^ichael Leavitt's direction, this slick production of "Lost In 
Younkers" is a local premiere. It's here for an open run. — by TOM WITOM 





HMKiA ri MOM (arm Honnco . t n> 



Topline performance in medium-duty trucks. 




Tlicre's a lot of muscle In ihcse mcdrum-dmy irucks - 
UD TRUCKS. Choose ihe one that's right for you. Ejich 
cJclivcrs the rugged dcpcndibility needed by industrial distribu- 
tors, wholcsnicrs, spcciahy retailers- all kinds of users. Clioosc 
from a range of available dicsel engines, 210 Up und 240 Hp 
intercoolcd and turbochurgcd. Chonsc the right whcclba.sc for 
you: UD TRUCKS handle van bodies from 10' to 26'. All 
provide the maneuverability of acabover for real hondliiTg case. 

• StraiRht Irucks with GV)VR.s from 1 J,006 lo 32,900 Ib.s 

• A 60,000 lb GCWR triicior 

• Vun body lcn{«tli<i frnin 10' to 26' 

• fi-spccd and 9-specd manual nitii a full range oraptlonal 
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• IntcRmlcd powcrlndn 

• Culiovcr desJKn with panoramic vtsiliilily 



Optimum weight distribution 
• RcMiitilc dicsel power - 210 and 240 Hp 
See these ounumding mid-range trucks today. 

UD TRUCKS SpeclficJiClons 



Model 



UDI300 

UDI800 

UD2IXX) 

UD2300 

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Class CVWR Body leng ths* 



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19.840 lbs 
22.500 lbs 
25.995 lbs 
28,000 lbs 
29.760 lbs 
30,000 lbs 
32.900 lbs 



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1 2' to 26" 
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•Typical B(xiy Ijinpth asiumcs waicr level load. 



Whitmore's UD Truck Sales 



708-872-6532 



ix 



I: 
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m 



IF 



_4, 



t 



|: 



fi 



I 



Arts& 
f^ Crafts Show 

^^ ^ Presented by 

Hunter Country Club 

Richmond, Illinois 

Saturday, Nov. 7, 1992 

9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 

Crofters Wanted - 
For Information Call 

(815)678-3000 

Come Early • Have Lunch 

Hunter Country Club 

5419 Kenosha St. — 
Richmond, III./;?*! 

Rte. 173, 1 Block''* 
EastofRte. 12 

(815)678-3000 



MoreFwLess Is Best 
That's Qnmiion Sense. 



No charge with a $100 minimum balance. 
Common Sense Checking. 



D 



n today's world, where every hard- 
earned dollar counts, a litilc com- 
mon sense goes a long way. 
Thai's why we offer Common 
Sense Checking. As long as you maintam a 
$100 minimum balance you can eliminate 
checking fees forever. Common Sense 
Checking can help you save in other ways 
too. In addition to your first order of per- 
sonalized checks ai no charge and no -fee, 
unlimited chcckwriting, you'll receive all 
these other valuable extras: 

■ Earn Interest on Your Entire Checking 
B alance with $ 1 ,000 min. roqu ircmcn t 



■ Accidental Death Insurance 

■ Nationwide Discount Book for savings on 
travel, lodging, entertainment, dining and 
more 

■ Credit Card Protection 

■ Key Ring and Lost Key Return Service 

■ Emergency Cash Advance 

■ Subscription to Sojourns Travel Magazine 

It's not often someone offers you more for less. 
If the idea appeals to you, come on in and let's 
talk Common Sense. 




4B5 Lake Stneel, Aniioch. IL 60002 
(708) 838-BANK 




BROOKSIDB 



36044 N. Brcx5k8klB Dr.. Gumoe, IL 60031 
(708) 662- BANK 



FDIi 




:^iiltiiiA ...Aiii^ 









■ » 1 t .. u < 



Friday, Novombor 6, 1992 



H^WttJmttm^iUimuM'i,'^ 



'f 



^ 



4 




There 



I\1C>rMI>AY 



S Voices in harmony 



Women who enjoy singing are invited to attend a 
rehearsal of Voices in Harmony, a women*$ barbershop 
chorus. Rehearsal will be held Monday, Nov. 9 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Grandwood Park Community Center, 36630 
N. Hutchenis Rd., Gurnee. For Information call Nevie 
Gamble at 367-7375 or Peggy Wheelock at 223-4897. , 



'llll-SI>AY 



Young Single Parents 



For parents \^o are single, divorced or widowed, between the 
ages of 21 and 60 are welcome to Join Tuesday, Nov. 10 at the 
Uptown Ballrbom, 6216 22 Ave., Kenosha, Wis, between 8 and 11 

• * . 

Dragster 



p.m. for dancing and socializing. For information call Buzz at 
(414)652-1677. 

Genealogical Society 

The Lake County (ID Genealogical Society will meet on 
Tuesday, Nov. 10 at United Methodist Church of Libertyville, 429 
Bralnerd In Libertyville at 7:30 p.m. Barbara Turner will speak 
about Long Grove History. For information call Joan at 566-1789 
or Wanda at 546-4154. 

Autism Society of America 

The Northeast Illinois Chapter of the Autism Society of America 
meets on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at Vernon Hills Village Hall in Vernon 
Hills from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For Information call Lee Werner at 
587-6688. 



Wi:i>NI':SDAY 



'Handling the Holidays* 

The Hospice of Northeastern Illinois will hold "Handling the 
Holidays" for families struggling through the first holiday season 
after the death of a loved one on Wednesday, Nov. U from 7 to 9 
p.rh. In Harrington, 410 S. Hager. For information call June 
Benton or Glenna Waxier at 391-5599. 



itit 



(Continued from page 28) 
more they'll be able to 
race. This is an expensive 
sport. 

If the engine were to go, a 
replacement would cost 
about $40,000. A new blow- 
er costs about $6,000 and 
an active racer could easily 
go through three or four in 



a season. And there are 
many other parts that need 
to be replaced throughout 
the season. Beyond that, 
there arc travel expenses to 
the race sites. 

Joanne has put together a 
marlceting package with 
which she hopes to inform 
potential sponsors about 



the crew and about the 
sport of drag racing. She 
said companies that aren't 
familiar with racing aren't 
aware of the benefits. 

"Companies that are into 
racing realize that racing 
gives good coverage. 
Racing fans arc really loyal 
io the sponsors," said 



Joanne. 

If the crew could find a 
major sponsor, Joanne 
dreams of eventually going 
into racing full time. But 
first there's the 1993 sea- 
son. She said her goal is to 
win a major national event. 
If she does, it could be the 
Icey to her dream. 



rtlURSDAY 



Daughters of the Revolution 

Ansei Braioerd Coolc Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution will meet Thursday, Nov. 12 at noon in the Country 
Squire Restaurant, Grayslake. The program will be presented by 
Dorothy Dradford on "The first Thanlcsglving." For Information 
call 223-4605 or 816-7208. Guest are welcome. 

Alzheimer's Association 

The Chicago Area Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association pre- 
sents Alzheimer's Disease: Understanding and Coping, a Series of 
Town'H?ill Meetings. The Lake County meetings will be held on 
Thursday, Nov. 12 at 6:30 p.m. in the First National Banlc of 
Chicago, Chicago; Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 7p.nL at the Hinsdale 
Community House, Hinsdale; and Thursday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.tiL at 
the College of Lake County, Grayslake. For information call 933- 
1000. 

AAUW holds dinner 

Mid-Lake County branch of the American Association of 
University Women will hold a dinner meeting Thursday, Nov. 12 
at 6;30 p.m. at Lamb's Country Inn, Libertyvilie. The speaker will 
he Dr. Rosemary Keller. Reservations must be made by Nov. 8. 
For information call 367-0570. 

Exchange Club 

The Exchange Club of Grayslake meets every Thursday at 
noon at Raridell's Restaurant in Grayslake. Visitors and prospec- 
tive members are invited to Join the club for lunch and learn more 
about the Exchange. For more Information and reservations con- 
tact Bob Wegge at 223-0777, Monlka O'Connor 223-5547 or loAnn 
Ritzwoller at 223-8161. 



We Proudly Sell 



ncii^ti^ 



Tgitmi^^ 



We're Dealing! 

SHOP US LAST! 



Beardsley s TV 

2923 Sunset Wkgn 
623-0631 



Weight No Longer! 



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Uc.# 
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BINGO 

Every Wednesday 6:4S p.in. 

HALL FOR RBNT 

^PimL^C Sunday Breakfast • 7 a.m. to Noon 






SPAGHETTI DINNER 

FrL Nov. 6 5 pm to 9 pm 

Adults $3.50 Children 12 & Under $2.00 



Lake Villa VFW Railroad & Grand 
Post 4308 ^ 356-9848 



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Begin losing weight now with one of 
our individualized programs: 



♦ NutriQuest VVeight Management 

Very Low Calorie Diet for the individual 
with medical risks. 



♦ Lean for Life 

A twelve-week diet and exercise class. 



4 One-to-One Nutritional Consultations 

Individualized to meet your dietary needs. 



Callus today! 



'g- 



816-6100, ext 5770 



Condell Medical Center's 
Medical Center Health Institute 

200 West Golf Road • Libertyville, IL 



The Medial Center Hcailh Institute 's stsff of physicians, . 
nurses, registered dietitians, exercise physiologists, behavior 
specialists, athletic trainers and physical therapists is ready to 
help you attain your weight-related goals. 

Localedin Centre Ctub 



KARNES MUSIC CO. 

GRAND 

OPENirVG 

SALE! 









'Mt%:. 



#i 



SAVE 

10-50 % 






PLUS STORE-WIDE SAVINGS! 



HEBlSTEfl TO WIN YAMAHA CLAVIlimi] 



NEW TO LA KE COU NTY 

KARNES 

MUSIC CO. 

HAWTHORN HILLS FASHION SQUARE 

S.W. Corner Rt. 60& 21. Vernon Hills* 367-1681 



Tatricia's 

AMISH 
FURNITURE 

d^ gifttt/are 

395 Lake St. • Antioch 

395-4780 
iCompleie Line of Solid Oak 
Furniture & Much Morel 

Stop in Today! 





BARK 'N' TOWN 

KENNELS 

^ •Boarding 
Grooming 'Pet Supplies 

Joiif'Pcls >{cmc ^way from -Momt 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd., 
Ingleside >,-.;,:■'.*/ 

(815)385-0632 li^k 



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ALL MOVIES & TIMES START FRIDAY 11-6-92 



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TOM SELLECK AS 

MR. BASEBALL (PG) 



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708 H MILWAUKEE 
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JOE PESO 

PUBLIC EYE (R) 



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Friday, November 6, 1992 



lalcelarKJ Newspapors 33 



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Frankenstein— live in Waukegan 



Frankenstein. It may 
bring to mind tiie famous 
film scene in which the 
Creature alludes lynching 
by a hateful, torch-carry- 
ing mob or maybe the 
more recent "Young 
Frankenstein" which has 
the monster smoking 
cigars and tapping out a 
song and dance routine. 

For some the only 
Frankenstein worth not- 
ing is the literary version 
— a gripping tale of hor- 
ror, a tale which wrestles 
with the idea that science 
experiments can get out of 
hand. 

In Victor Gialanella's 



stage adaptation of Mary 
Shelley's "Frankenstein," 
the Waukegan 
Community Players bring 



Review by 
CLAUDIA M. LENART 



this macabre, yet sad, tale 
to life. 

Frankenstein is playing a 
short two-weekend run at 
the Melba Wixom 
Theatre, Washington and 
Jackson Streets, at the old 
East Waukegan High 
School. Remaining dates 
are Nov. 6 and 7 at 8 p.m.. 



and Nov. 8 at 3 p.m. 

Richard Pope is strong as 
the Creature. He has the 
size to be convincing, but 
he is also able to inject 
emotion into the charac- 
ter. He wears an expres- 
sion of deep melancholy 
that seems to be saying 
"What am I doing here?" 

The Creature in this ver- 
sion of the story is not the 
eloquent speaker of 
Shelley's book, but the 
grunter of the film ver- 
sions. Pope's grunt is ef- 
fective, helped out by a 
voice synthesizer. 

One of the moments of 
this play is when the crea- 



Lake Forest Symphony receives grant 



The Lake Forest 
Symphony Assn. was one 

of 29 Ciiicago-area non- 
profit organizations that 

received a grant from 

Marshall Fields' as part of 

its spring Community 
Giving Program. The 



symphony uses the funds 
for a special holiday con- 
cert entitled Christmas by 
Candlelight with the Lake 
Forest Symphony. 

The performance, 
under Maestro Paul 
Anthony McRae, will take 



place at Rhoades 
Auditorium, Chicago 
Medical School, 3333 
Green Bay Rd., North 
Chicago at 4 p.m. on 
Sunday, Dec. 6. Adult tick- 
ets are $20 and children 
$10. For reservations call 
295-2135. 



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ture runs or rather stum- 
bles off the stage and 
down the theater aisles. 
He looks at people in the 
audience shying away like' 
a frightened beast. Some 
kids in the audience were 
awed by this. 

Another notable mo - 
ment is when Justine 
played by Elisabeth ' 
Sherman is dragged off 
the stage, accused of mur- 
dering William 
Frankenstein, the young 
nephew of Victor 
Frankenstein. She pleads 
for mercy and lets out a 
shrill cry/scream. She's a 
good screamer. 

Ray Wolverton is believ- 
able in acting out Victor 
Frankenstein, the scientist 
lacking In conscience, 
who is besieged by the 
deathly results of his ex- 
periment. 

The stage design Is ap- 
propriately eerie, starting 
out with a fog filled grave- 
yard scene. During die 
creation scene, fireworks 
do the trick to simulate 
the apparams being hit by 
lighming— the fluke that 
brought the creature to 
life. 

One problem was an in- 
termission that lasted too 
long making for a restless 
audience. 

You don't need to be a 
fan of horror to enjoy 
Frankenstein. However, 
kids who are horror fans 
would benefit from seeing 
a live performance of a 
horror classic that skips 



the blood and gore In fa- 
vor of psychologicfd 
drama. Unlike much of 
today's horror, 
FranJkenstein stimulates 
not only the blood, but 



also the mind. 

Tickets for Frankenstein 
are $6 for adults, and $5 
for seniors and students. 
For more information call 
.662-0181. 



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ARIES (March 21 -April 19) Once " 
more you see the wisdom of focusing 
on your goals, and you know that suc- 
cess can be yours. The question is, do 
you have to have instant gratification 
or can you wait till the weekend? Let 
your personality flow all weekend 
long. 

TAURUS (April 20.May 20) You 
. go from low to high this week- Because 
you radiate such high energy, you feel 
wonderful and are able to move in 
many new direcrions. Try finding 
something you really care about and 
embrace it, 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Follow 
tlirough on a fantasy. You can have it 
all, if you're willing to break through 
your own limitations and just let things 
happen. You crash through the work 
week — you have so much to do, and 
you do it quickly. Greet the weekend 
with open arms. 

CANCER (June 21 -July 22) Knock 
out fmancial and emotional agree- 
ments as soon as you can. Be in contact 
with people who don't reflect your 
own views. It will help you to "^stretch" 
and understand more. Plan on being 
around home this weekend. 

LEO (July 23-August 22) Get to the 
bottom of a problem quickly this week. 
It could cost you some money or a 
couple of heartaches, but, if handled 
well, ypu and another could both be 
wiruiers. Plan on a mini -vacation this 
weekend — the more exotic, the better. 

VIRGO (August 23-Septembcr 22) 
Though you start the work week well, 
you may discover you are rather scat- 
tered by week's end. The good news is, 
how you get scattered and with whom 
may truly be a delight. Count on plenty 
of intimate talks, romantic dinners and 
warm moments this weekend. 

LIBRA (September 23-October 22) 
Creative forces are high, and you make 
headway quickly. Touch base with a 



loved one who means much to ypu for 
long lengthy talks. You need to meet 
this person halfway if you know what 
is good for you. By the weekend, 
another's wish is your command. 

SCORPIO (October 23-November 
2 1) What to do with a family or domes- 
tic matter may distract you from work 
this week. However, once resolved or 
accepted, you move into a highly crea- 
tive period where you arc full of ideas 
and ready to experience every vestige 
oflife to the fullest. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22- 
Deccrhbcr 21) You enjoy the s\yifl 
pace and the happy moments as 
another makes it quite clear how they 
feel about you. You have many choices 
ahead, and you are just getting a glim- 
mer of your options. Don't get bogged 
down by the thought of change. 

CAPRICORN (December 22- 
January 19) Though you may be in- 
clined to hold on tightly to funds, you 
come up with more ideas, errands and 
ways of spending the almighty buck 
this week. In some way you need to 
trim the red tape in your life without 
adding extra expenses. Spend a mel- 
low weekend at home with loved one. 

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 
1 8) The planets add extra get up and go 
this week into your plate. You may 
also notice when you aren't busily 
answering a call or accepting an invita- . 
tion that you are getting what it is you 
want. You learn the power of a positive 
presentation. Exercise this talent all 
weekend long. 

PISCES (February 19-March 20) 

Your vitality may be down this week, 

but at the last minute, charisma, 

vitality and charm exude out of you, 

making this not only a banner work 

week but also a banner weekend. Do 

be careful about that.Piscean trait of 

going overboard. 

01992 by King Featurea Synd. 



I One-man show portray s Einstein 

f 



A philosophical por- 
trayal of the 20th century 
genius Albert Einstein 
will be provided in a 
dramatized lecture at the 
College of Lake County at 
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 
Nov. 1 1 in the auditorium 
on the Grayslake campus. 
Award-winning play- 
wright and speaker Man 
Zuberbuehler will com- 
bine his skills as re- 
searcher and orator to 
portray Einstein and 
stimulate a feast of theo- 
ries and observations 
about science, history and 
current global culture. 



Zuberbuehler is a Jour 
nalisni and drama grad- 
uate of the Univ. of 
Wisconsin. In his guise as 
Einstein, Zuberbuehler 
wHl examine issues of 
war, pollution, poverty 
and other dangerous 
conditions of the world 
and provide thought - 
provoking ideas to create 
a kinder, gentler world 
and sustain peace. 

Tickets for the show are 
$4 general admission and 
$2 for GLG students and 
alumni. For information 
call 223-6601, ext. 2300. 




Alan Zuberbuehler as 
Albert Einstein. 







THE ORIGINAL HARPER SVIOVJ 

YULETIDE 
COLLECTIOKS 





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ACROSS 

1 . Facts 

S. Card holding 
91 Siamese, 
for one 

12. Once — a 
lime 

13. Ifal. river 

14. Chalice 

15. Silver dollar 
(slang) 

17. Aries 

18. meadows 

19. Kind of 
machine 

21. Shoestring 

24. Fr. composer 

25. Culture 
medium 

26. Musical iniro. 

30. Hockey star 

31. Schemes 

32. Intelligence 
org., 

33. One given 
to ridicule 

35. A chain of 
mountains 
Toward the 
mouth 
Senses 
Heathen 

40. Sport group 

42. Melody 

43. Protected 
roll of film 

48. Mountain 
on Crete 

49. Redact 

50. Comer of 
a room 

51. Beaver's 




36. 

37. 
38. 



edifice 

52. Sown, in 
heraldry 

53. Dies — . 
DOWN 

1 . French 
nobleman 

2. Braz. tree 

3. High hill 

4. Deer's 
headgear 

5. Sunk fence 

6. War god 

7. Compass 
reading 

8. Mexican 
pesos 



9. Scroll-like 
ornament 

10. Oriental 
nurse 

11. Docile 
1 6. Moist 

20. High, in 
music 

21. Asian country 

22. Site of the 
Taj Mahal 

23. Kind of map 

24. Religious 
season 

26. Fetid 

27. Duel 

28. Monetary 



29. Consumes 
31. Capers 
34. Author Levin 
, 35. Sign of the 

zodiac 
37. Distant 
. 38. Reimbursed 
39. Verdi opera 
. 40. Decorate 
41. Diminutive 

suffix 

44. American 
humorist 

45. June bug 

46. Tibetan 
antelope 

47. Piece out 



'( 



unit of Iran. ,„ 

Answers on page 43 



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lakeland -N«wipap«rt 35 






.ri<!!Sffiaili^-,.^, 



Lakeland Newspapers 



m 



NOTICES 



(708) 223-81 61 



Obituaries 



Death 
Notices 



'V* 



Helga E. O'Donnell 

Age 70, nee Larsen, a Fox Lake, IL resident for the 
past 8 yrs, and a former long time resident of Detroit 
Michigan, died Thursday Oct. 22, 1992 in her home. 

She was bom in Memphis, Michigan on Oct. 5, 
1922 to Christian Larsen and Anna Pedersen. 

Survivors include: 1 son: Raymond O'Donnell and 
1 daughter Charlene Ernst both of Fox Lake, IL with 
whom she made her home. 1 Grandaughter: Allison 
Ernst of Trevor City, Michigan. 1 Brother: Harvey 
Larsen of Ellijay, GA. By her brother-in-law: Carl 
Fetter of Milford Michigan. 14 nieces and nephews, 35 
great nieces and great nephews, and 16 great, great 
nieces and nephews survive and reside in the U.S. 4 
cousins Carla Petersen, Esther Ackander, Erik Poulsen 
and Thora Olsen survive and reside in Denmark, Other 
relatives survive. 

She was preceded in death by: 3 brothers, Edgar, 
Russell, and Harold Larsen. Preceded in death by 2 
sisters; Lillian Evans and Esther Fetter. Private services 
were conducted by the K.K. Hamsher Funeral Home, 
12 N. Pistakee Lk. Rd. Fox Lake, IL. 60020 (The 
Chapel of the Lake.) 

In lieu of flowers the family will appreciate 
memorials to Greenpeace, 1436 U St. NW, Washington 
D. C. 20009 

Interment was private. 

Shirley E. Stuebner 

Age 68, Fox Lake, IL resident for the past 46 years, 
formerly of Elgin, IL. died Monday, Nov. 2, 1992 at the 
Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Hts., IL. 
Mrs. Stuebner was bom on Oct. 8, 1924 in Batavia, IL. 
She was a veteran of World War II, having served with 
the U.S. Navy Waves. Mrs. Stuebner had been 
employed as a sccTetary for the Illinois State 
Scholarship Commision in Dccrfield, IL for over 10 
years. 

Survivors include son Steven (Veronica) Stuebner 

of Libertyville, IL; daughter Sandra (William) Hansen 

of Invemess, IL.; 3 granddaughtei? • Susan, Elizabeth 

• and Kathi>'n Hansen, and 1 grandson - David Hansen, 

all of Invemess, IL. 

Friends of the family called from 3-9 p.m. 
Wednesday November 4, 1992 at the K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, 12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL. 
(The Chapel on the Lake) Funeral services were 
conducted at 8:(X) p.m. Wednesday evening. Interment 
was private on Thursday. In lieu of flowers, the family 
ttvill appreciate memorials for the Scleroderma 
Foundation in greater Chicago, 175 W. Jackson Blvd. 
(Rm. 917), Chicago, IL 60604. 

Adeline Auxier 

Age 77, of Kenosha, WI died on October 28, 1992 
at the American International Hospital in Zion, IL. . 

She was bom on September 12, 1915 in Chicago, 
IL to Francis and Anna (Nudulney) Davis. Adeline 
made her home in the Chicago area until 1959 at which 
time she moved to Antioch, IL. In 1975 she moved to 
Daggett, MI and m September 1992 moved to Kenosha. 
iShe was educated m the Schools of Chicago and was a 
graduate of Lucy Flower High School. 

She is survived by her husband, Charles Auxier, 
whom she married on March 15, 1932 in Chicago. 
Survivors also include one son, Charles Jr. of Pine, CO; 
one daughter, Carol Moxley of Chicago; nine 
grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. 

She was preceded in death by her parents, one great 
grandson Jerry and one sister Bemice. 

Memorial services were held on Sunday, November 
1, 1992 at the Hansen Funeral HomCj Kenosha, WI. 
There was no visitation. Interment was in Highland 
Park Cemetery, Libertyville, IL. 



Ethel D. Larson 

97 years old of Antioch. IL passed away Monday 
November 2, 1992 at Rolling Hills Manor, Zion, IL. 
She was bom August 6. 1895 in Birmingham, England. 
She arrived in Canada on Jan 3, 191 1 and later became 
a citizen of the U.S. on June 9, 1941. She had lived m 
Antioch for the past several years. 

She was a member of the United Methodist Church 
"of Antioch; The Butler Chapter of the Order of Eastern 
Star and the Telephone Pioneers of Illinois. She had 
been a telephone operator for Illinois Bell for 32 years. 

On June 4, 1920 she married Louis Larson in 
Montreal Canada and he preceded her in death on Nov 
29, 1981. 

Survivors include her daughter, Dorothy Evelyn 
(Theodore) Juergens of Antioch, 1 Brother, William 
Bairows of Oakland, Calif., 5 Grandchildren, Theodore 
Juergens, Edwin (Cindy) Juergens, Gay (Dr. Robert) 
Svcn, Louise (Joe) Stephens and Evelyn (Robert) 
Livingston; Great Grandmother of 10, Great Great 
Grandmother of 5. Besides her husband she was 
preceded in death by 1 Grandson Paul Juergens and by 
1 Brother and 5 Sisters. 

Funeral Services were held at 7:00 PM Wed. Nov. 
4, 1992 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main St, 
(Rte 83) Antioch with the Rev. Kurt Gamlin of the 
United Methodist Church of Antioch officiating. 
Interment was private. Friends called at the funeral 
home from 4 PM Wed. until time of services. In. lieu of 
flowers donations may be made to the Antioch Rescue 
Squad or the Antioch Senior Center, in her memory. 



t<?x^^t^'>t^^»^^e^>L^i 



A. John Goodwin 

54, vice president of manufacturing for Goelitz 
Confectionery Co., died on Friday, October 30, 1992 
after a sudden illness. Goodwin managed the 
production staff of 1 10 at the plant and was in charge of 
all production of the more than 140 candies made by 
the company. 

The company is best known as the maker of Jelly 
Belly* jelly beans and supplies thousand of retailers 
from the east coast to the Rockies. 

Goodwin, a native of the Yorkshire area of 
England, was a thirty-year veteran of the confectionery 
business. He had been with Goelitz Confectionery Co. 
since June 1991 and prior to that was president of 
Bindler North America, the U.S. division of a German 
manufacturer of chocolate molding equipment. He first 
came to the U.S. in 1983 as vice president of operations 
for Andes Candies. In England, he had begun his 
candy career with Cavenham Confectionery Ltd. in 
Bristol. ■ ' 

Goodwin was bom in Bristol, England, and earned 
a Mechanical Engineering degree from Doncaster 
Technical College in 1962. 

"Anyone acquainted with John will remember his 
dedication, enthusiasm, hard .work and wonderful sense 
of humor. He will be missed by all who had the 
privilege of knowing and working with him," said Bill 
Kelley, president of Goelitz Confectionery Co. 

Goodwin is survived by his wife Elaine and son 
Julian, who live in Grayslake, IL and daughter 
Stephanie Smith, and two grandchildren, who reside in 
Bristol, England. 

Funeral services were held at St. Andrew's 
Episcopal Church in Grayslake on Wednesday, 
November 4, 1992. 

In lieu of flowers the family requests contributions 
may be made to the American Heart Association, 1117 
S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL 60048. 



Sue O. (Barrettsmith) Fisher 

of Long Lake/lngleside passed away Monday, 
November 2, 1992 at Lake Forest Hospital after a long 
illness. 

She was bora in Fosston, Minnesota. She was a 
member of St. Bede's Catholic Church in Ingleside and 
a member of the Waukegan Yacht Club and also the 
Tuesday Tillies of the Long Lake Yacht Club. 

She is survived by her children H. Straten (Nancy) 
Barrettsmith H, G. John (Denisc) Barrettsmith, Sr., 
Scott K. (Julie) Barrettsmith, Sr., Suzee (Art) Elliott, 
Nancee A. Barrettsmith, Mary Barrettsmith, Teres 
Vicicondi and Thomas J. Barrettsmith. She is also 
survived by her grandchildren Coleen, Tack, Becky, 
Katie, Tina, Shane, Rosie, Gordie, Kyle, Tuffy, Vic, 
Brooke Elizabeth, Leah, Jessica, Amy Sue, Heather, 
Jeanna Elizabeth, Zackery and Skimmer. 

She was preceded in death by her husband, William 
J. Fisher. 

Funeral services will be held on Friday, November 
6, 1992 at 8:45 a.m. from Ringa Funeral Home, 122 S. 
Milwaukee Ave., (Rt. 83), Lake Villa to St. Mary of 
Vemon Church, Vemon Hills for a 10:00 a.m. funeral 
mass. Interment at Ascension Cemetery. Friends may 
call at the funeral home, Thursday from 1 p.m. until 9 
p.m. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials to "Y-ME" Breast 
Cancer Society of Lake Forest Hospital or Children's 
Memorial Hospital, Chicago would be appreciated. 

Death Notices 



ADAMS 

John "Jack" Adams, 
66, of Ingleside, IL. 
Arr: American Family 
Funeral Home, Gary, 
IL. 

BErrzEL 

William E. Bcilzcl, 
73, of Waukegan, 
formerly of 

Libertyville, IL. 
BISCHOFF 
Loreen Lynn 

Bischoff, 23 years old 
of Fort Campbell, 
Kentucky, formerly of 



Antioch, IL. Arr: 

Strang Funeral Home, 

Antioch, EL. 

BOLLER 

Helen Boiler, 92, of 

Anaheim, CA., 

formerly of 

Mundclein, IL, Arr: 

Kristan Funeral 

Home, Mundclein, IL. 
CRADDOCK 

Ida Mae Craddock, 

78, of Round Lake 

Beach, BL. Arr; Strang 

Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL. 



DRZEWIECKI 

Bernicc Drzewiecki, 

84, of Norridge, IL., 

recent resident of 

Libertyville, IL.. Arr: 

The Burnett-Dane 

Funeral Home, 

Libcrtyvile, III. 
GRAVES 

John C. Graves, 90, of 

Gurnee, IL. Arr: 

Marsh Funeral Home 

of Waukegan, IL. 

HASWELL 

Albert Sterling 

Haswcll, 84, of 

Ingleside, IL. Arr; 

Privalc. 
HUGHES 

Margaret M. Hughes, 

82, of Wauconda, IL. 

Arr: Wauconda 

Funeral Home, 

Wauconda. IL. 
IMPASTATO 

Linda A. Impastatb, 

42, of Gurnee, IL. 

Arr: the Marsh 

Funeral Home of 

Gurnee, IL. 
KOLODZIEJ 

Casmir Kolodzicj, 62, 
of North Chicago, II. 
Arr: The Salata 
Funeral Home 
LAHEY 

Margaret H. Lahey 
(nee Clark), 86, 
Millbum, IL, formerly 
. of Gurnee, II. Arr: 
Gurnee Funeral 
Home, Giinice, IL. 
ZUPANCIC 
John A. Zupancic, 86, 
of Gurnee, IL. Arr: 
The Marsh Funeral 
HomeofGuniee, IL. 



Grief note 

[The loss of a spouse at any age means a change of rou-| 
Itlne and a change In our relationships with others. 
Older people may be more aware of death because they| 
see it more often but it is not usually easier to accept. 
For the older person there may be fewer contacts withl 
friends. There may be more loneliness and depression.] 
|lt may be more difficult to perform such tasks as shop- 

Do older people 

handle grief 

better? 

Iping or cutting the lawn. As with all grieving people you I 
lean help by offering rides, inviting them to meals and by 
Itruly making tliem feel welcome. Offering them a chance to| 
Italk about their loved one gives them a way to express feel- 
ings. 





l^UnfXi. mast, , . 6afi 






:TtArvej(Ctl .Juune^ ^zic6. 



• -m* K4*yV*/<.H AS« iM* " 



igrsB «).. 



12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone:(708)587-2100 • (815)385-1001 



36 Lakokind NoWspapori 



,< i « |£ f/C i }■>•(< K 



t| lr'{ 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



"1-,-'-^- 



i rtuu Mwtg^awana 



rUg ft i Wgtf * * flMM>Tl 1 



...TlUu>r«3.'i. 



^ M« j ii* ] 1 1 " I " f "if" " i "i "^ ■ -~'^ 'Tr"*^-r^T J ™ i l 



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^ -' '--T - H il K tf i» ^*r 



Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



(708)223-8161 



fl 




FOUND: PURE WHITE cal with 
blue eyes, and 'special' Been 
stray since Juno] Fox Lake area, 
(nearSeara Ptaza) Very Lovable, 
Call to WentHy (708) 587-8271 

FOUND: TINY LONG HAIRED 
female dog Iwlth short legs 
(Lhaso-Apso typo 777) Vldnlty 
of Rt 12 and Grand Ave, Fox 
Lake, on 10/Zl. Call to Identify 
(708)587-2243. 
L03TI1 BLACK AND WHTTE 
female cat, 10/15/92, vidnlty: 
Grayslake Animal Hospital, 
Call (706)546-2257. 
ARE YOU tHAT GOOD 
SAIMARITIAN7 Have you 
FOUND Lost Articles or 
someones special PET? Call 
Lakeland Classifieds TODAY 
AND GET RESULTS and 
FOUND ads are run FREEH 
Call (708}223-8161 . 
2-OO-0O 

Free 




FREE BEGINNiRS 

.NEEDLEPUNCH Craft 

Classes, Friday. Nov. fi, 7pm 
at McHenry Church of God, 
3813 John Street, McHenry. 
More info?? (708)526-2040. 
3-44-55 




PcrBonals 



OUTDOOR AND ACTIVE 
Caring couple wanis to adopt. 
If you are, or know ot anyone 
who Is pregnant, please call 
(708)577-2690 collect. 

. 4-47-44/G 
PLANE TICKETS' (3) 1 way. 
f/llwaukeo to San Francisco, 
Expires Dec. 14. SlOO/each 
Call (708)548-1904. 
4-45-7 
ADOPTION- A LOVING 
altemaUve. A f ulj-llme Mom and 
professional Dad would love to 
otferyour btaby a siAxjtban honne, 
extorided tamly inducing adoptira 
cousins, a college education, 
and a tiappy home to grow up In. 
Neighborhood parks and pools, 
family vacations and trips to tf>e 
zoo are wailing. 

Medlcal/Legal/Courtsellng paid. 
Call to talk or meet, Lucy and 
John, collect, (708)965-8763. 

BEARS TICKETSIt 2-SEATS. 
Sun. 1 1/a. SokJIor Field, 7pm 
Game. Bears vs. Cincinnati. Call 
(708) 740-2789. 



Auclions 




BHBBBOBHHBHHHB 

S AUCTION 3 

» GWNT DISCOUNT 3 
E STORE a 
D $500,000 Inventory ni 
n THE HALF ^ 

D PRICE STORE n 

n 1726 Sheridan Road 01 
D North Chicago D 
n We have been commisstoned Dj 
n to sell the entire stock and O 
B riKtures to the bare walls. AJI O 
n New Merchandise. All name O 
D brands, sundries, lewelry, O 
D tods, clothes, lawn and gar- O 
P den, school supplies and 3 
B much more. Starting Wed., O 
D Nov. 4th; 4:00 p.m. and each Q 
D Wed. and Sal. until all Is sold. Q 
E For brochures and mora ^ 
P inforrrulion on dales call: U 
E CONSOUDATED AUCTION CO. O 
g (70B) 356-9500 ^ 
|] Sat, Auctions at 10:00 a,m. [j 
|] Wed. Auctions at 4:00 p.m. (j 
(J Security On Premises (j 

BHHyggsauHHHBHa 




Financial 



$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

I MONEY I 

I A personal, | 
$ debt s 
I consolidation | 
$ and home $ 
$ Equity Loans $ 
I up to 50K. I 



1-800-926-1141 



$ 

$$$$$$$$$$$$ 





HelpWanled, 
Part-Time 



EASY MONEY 
TELEMARKETING. No 

experience necessary, will 
train, part-lime evening. Earn 
$5 lo SBper hour. Call Troy 
after 3pm Mon-Frl. (708)918- 
7734. 

19-51-110 

GET PAID TO Lose twdy FAT, 
increase your energy, look 
younger, ktwer chotesterot, butki 
your Immune system, Improve 
ptrysicaJ perfoimance. Call NOW 
800/388-9473. 

SNOWPLOWERS WANTED! 
$45 per hour. Lots o1 WoiW (708) 
540-9877. 



Floor Cara 

CARPET 
GLEANING 

Flexible Hours 
Apply in Person 

Hiltcrest 
Nursing Center 

1740 N. Circuit Drive 
Round Lake Beach, IL 



RECEPnONISTf 
CDSIDMERSERVICE 

Lai(etand Newspapers is 
seeking a qualified candi- 
date to fill a position of 
Receptionist/Customer 
Service. The right candi- 
date will be enthusiastic, 
witting to learn, enjoy 
working witfi the public, 
type 45 wpm and be able 
to handle multiple phone 
'lines. 
Ptease apply in person at; 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



Part Time 

Lokeland MewapapeiB, 

Lake County's fastest 

growing group of weekly 

newspapers la currently 

expanding our Inside Soles 

DepL and we ore seeking 

qualified candidates for 

port time telamflrf<et'ing, 

We offer evening hours, 

Mon.-Thurs., 5-8 pm and 

Saturdays 10-2. We offer 

solary plus commission 

and a pleasant working 

environment An excellent 

opportunity for mothers 

end students. 

Call 

Joanne Dawson 

After 4 pm . 

(708) 223-81 61 

II For more information 



HelpWanted 
Pan-Time 




RECEPTIONIST 

•Answer t^hones 
•IJgW Typing 

•Some Oala Entry fttnquiiy 
Accent 

(708)918-8367 



No selling, must be 
reliable. Minimum 4-6 

hours per week. 
Permanent posiSons. 

Call 
(708)515-5822 



1)(S.CLEI1)(/IIECEPTIMST 

For busy rxin-smok- 
ing medical office in 
Fox Lake. Typing and 

computer wofk 
Exp. preferred but wil 

train right person 

Hours 

M.T.Th,F 

10-6 pm 

Cail: 

(708) 587-6333 




4 HO-HO-HO « 

^ Do you love the ^ 
A Holiday Season? a 

* Do you enjoy working 

* wllhdiUdrcn? * 
4 lfSo,WeNcedYouI 4 
n Western has openings for • 
It Santas, Cashiers, * 
A ^Photographers, arid a 
~ ' Managers (or the ~ 
4 Hawlliom Mall Santa ^ 
jf Program. Positions begin j, 
it November 20 wKh day. # 
« evening & weekend hours a 

* available. We will be " 
A recruiting at Hawthorn A 
^ f*lal1onNovemt)ef9. ^ 
4 Call to set up an appt 4 

4 (708)562-7474 « 



HOUSEKEEPING 



Nursing home 

experience 

necessary, cleaning 

resident rooms and 

common areas. 

•Flexible Hours 

•1 week Vacation 

After 1 year 

Union $5.00 per hour. 

Apply in Person 

9-4 
Monday - Friday 

HniCREST 
NUKSMG CENTER 

1740 N. Circuit Drive 

Round lake Beach, IL 

60073 



II 



Paid On Call 

The Lake Zurich Fire Deparment is look- 
ing for dedicated and aggressive Part- 
Time Firefigfiters'. If you live within the 
Village of Lake Zurich or its Fire 
Protection District and can work flexible 
hours, you're invited to attend an orienta- 
tion session on: 
November 14, 1992, 3:00 PM 
321 S. Buesching Road 
Lake Zurich, Illinois 
Requirements: Age 21 or older 
Training, Pay and other benefits will be 
addressed at the orientation 




HelpWuited, 
Part-Time 



CUSTOMER 

ASSISTANCE 

Round Lake Beadi 
Weekdays & Weekends 

flexijie hours 
(708) 438-9187 



YOU ALWAYS Hlf 
THE MAR K WIT H 

THB CLASSIFIEDS 



HelpWanted 
Parl-Time 




llelpWanled 
Part-Time 




UelpW] 



'anted 
Part-Time 




NATURE WOHIUi 

to 3U{)ervl3e senior citizen 
In Lake Zurich arxi provide 
Iranspoitatfon lo Ubertyvllle 
5 days per week 6 a.m. to 
7:30 a.m. Reliable trans- 
portation, Insurance and 
references required. Good 
pay to the right person. Cail 
evenings 726-2842 or 215- 
8710 days and ask for Gerl 



i ii »ii» i miiiuii»»»i»m 
R/ICKAGERS 

Shifts 1&2 

: Wkgn/Gumee Area 

Accent 

1(708)918-8307 

Tmnm i m»m»m»»iiT 



Mature Lady 

for Part Time 
Office Work 

*4^ per Hour 
call 708/487-1600 



PART TINE PERMANENT POSITION 

AUTOMOBILE REQUIRED 

McGraw-t-lill Information Services Company is In need of a 
person to collect building permit Information from selected 
local government offices within Lake County.' We estimate 
this Job will require approximately 20 hours per month. Wo 
pay S6.30 per office stop plus 24e per mile. This Job will 
pay approximately $190.00 per month. 

Please Respond By Handwritten (jstter To: 

Cal Kmeger 

e/o rW Dodge 

8112 Bluemound Rood 

Hit wauk ee.WI 53213 

Equal Opportunity Employof M/F 



WANTED! 

Retired or semi-retired 
person in good health 
needed lor some light 
janitorial duties. Basic 
maintenance with some 
light lifting required. No 
experience needed, just a 
desire to do a good job. 
15 to 20 houis per week, 
can be ilexible lo lii your 
schedule. For inierview 
appointment, please call 

Bill Schroeder, Jr. 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
(708)223-8161. 



MEDICAL 
RECORDS 

Hours 

Monday-Friday 

4prn- 8 pm 

Saturday 

9-1 

Experience Pfeferred 

Good Starting Salary 
Call: 

(708) 362-7050 

For Appt. 





Kenosha 
County 

•Bristol 




Cook County 



4 



Notices 1 

Lost & Found 2 . 

Ff«8 3 

Pononali 4 

Audlont 5 

Butlruts Pefsonata 6 

Financial - 7 

He^ Weniad Pafl-Tkne 1 9 

He^ Wanted F uB>Tlma 20 

Errptoymenl Agenclee 21 

Buiirwei Opportunlilde 22 

Wnk Wanted 23 

ChBd Oare 24 

School/lnflin>ctk>n 25 

M/IRfiETGlHDE 

AnIiquM 30 

Appjiancee 3t 

Bansr/Trade 32 

Bazaan/Cratta 33 

BuUlrtg iisiM\ah 34 

Buslneti/Ottlce Equipment 35 

Etectrofllca/Cofrputara 36 

Fonn Guide 37 

Rrawood 38 

Qa/aoa/numma0a Salee 40 



91ARfiErI* GUIDE 

CktodTlilnoBtoEat 4t 

Horsee & Jack 42 

HouBehctd Goods/Fumkurs 43 

L«wn/Gafd«n 44 

MiKaflanaout 45 

Medical Equi)ySuppfiee 4SA 

Musical Inttruments 46 

PsiB & Supfilles 47 

Tools & Machirwry 46 

Wanted To Buy 49 



RiyiLESTAIE 

Homes For Sale 50 

Homes For Rent 51 

Homes Wanted 52 

Homes SuHdens S3 

Condo/Town Homes 54 

Mobile Homes 55 

Apartmentt For Rent 56 

Apanments Wanted 57 

ApCJHotneeToSKars 58 

Rooms For Retrt 59 

Buslnoss Property For Sale 60 

Btjslnaea Property For Rem 61 

Faims 62 

Vacant LoU/AcraaQe 63 

Reeons/Vacatkm Rentais 64 

Out o4 Area Properly 6S 



realesttahq 

Cemetery Lots 
Real Estate Wanted 
Real Estate Misa 



66 
67 
68 



RECREiinOXilL 

Reaedlonal Vehicles 70 

Snowmoblla/ATV^ 7t 

Boais/Motora/Eta 72 

Canplng 73 

TravelA/acailon 74 

Spons Equipment 75 

Alrplanos 76 

IISAKSPOinAIlOX 

Cara For Sals 60 

RentaVLeasos 81 

Claselc/Antlqire Cars 62 

Service & Parts 63 

Car Loans/Insurance 64 

Vans 85 

Ttudu/Trallers 86 

Heavy EquipmBrrt 87 

Motacydee 86 

Wanted To Buy BO 

§ER¥lCEDmECroRr 

Appllaiwea Repair Si 

Blacktop S3 



smviCEDmccroRT 

BuBders 35 

Carpentry 37 

Carpet Cleaning 38 

ConaetaCemsnt SS 

DryWal 810 

EducaliofWnslnjclion S1 1 

Electitoal S13 

Firewood S13A 

Har>dirman 314 

Heailng/Air Condllofirtg Si 5 

HousQl^eopIng S16 

Landscaping S17 

Laundry/Cleaning S19 

Legal Servtces S21 

Movlng/StwaQe S23 

Paintlng/I>eoorallng 325 
ParaLegaVTypIng Senrices 326 

PloTTtolnfl 3Z7 

Pooft ^S 

Pressure Washing S30 

Pro<es6lonal Sofvloes 331 

hadkj/TV Repair 333 

Renvxlellng S35 ' 

Resumes S37 

RooflniySlding 839 

Storage S4t 

TaxServica 343 

Trees/Plant B 345 

Weddirig 347 

Miscellaneous 349 



Laketand*s Classified Ads appear in all 14 newspapers with a 

Readership of over 200,000 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Ploasa chedf your ad on the FIRST Insenion dde. In the event ot an enor or omiubn, we wil tie respontble lor ONLY the FIRST Incorrect 
Insertion. Ttie newspaper will be raspontibis (or only the parlion ol the ad that is In error. PisasG nol#y the ClauKied Department in Itie event ot an 
error wlhin 1 week of run date, CANCELLATONS m>it tw rrade prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

LakelarKl Newspapers reserves the right to property classity al ac^/eftislng, edk or delete any objectlonablo wording, or rejed any advenisement 
lor credK or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unltled headings. Lalteland Newtpapere does not Itnowing^ aocepi help wanted advertising that in 
anyway violales the Human Rights Ad. 



HouHs: Monday - Thursday 

. o A.M* ' O P.M. 

Friday 8 a.m. • 6 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. • Noon 

DEADLINE: 

Wednesdays at 10 a.m. 



(708) 223-8161 

Fax.: (708) 223-8810 





Payment in- advance is required 
for these ads: 

• Advertisers out ot Iceland circulation area 

• Business Opportunllles • Mobita Homes 

• Sltuatlona Wanted • Debt Dlsdalmers 

• Gar afle and Movtng Sales* 

•Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pels wil be conaJdend ior givoa way. 



Lakoland Nswspapon 37 



li«,'.lliC:r-2i:if -.1 



'Uii^.l.-K,l=£JslliLl;iiJ.«^^aI^ai;^^^«:;:y»caiaa*MRts^^ 



af-B'^-Jca^iT; ^^r^^^t »--'. Xkf^.K»'*irrnJt*fi^.^^y.ix:r crr^'*?-*?'" 



L-.l.iftLt. 



'■•^ 



Si ^ 






'i > 



P 




llclpWanlcsd 
Kull-Time 



IlclpWanlcd 
Full-Timc 



^^ra 



llclpWantcd 
FulUTimc 



M 



CARPENTEHU AND 

LABORERS Wanted: with own 
tranapoftaiion. If you are a 
dependable person, doesn't 
mind working hard, please call 
Block Roofing and Siding at 
(708)740-4923, weekdays, 
after 8pm or after 2pm on 
weekends. 

20-37*109 . 
$600 WEEKLY POSSIBLEII 
Working at home, 37 different 
opportunities. Rush $1.00 and 
a self addressed stamped 
envelope to Roger Williams, 
862ErfeSt.,ElQin, IL60123, 

20-*<^-'<7 



4.V 



Attn: Lake County 
Residents 

^ Postal Jobs ie 

$11 .41/hour to start, plus 
l>enefits. Postal earners, 
sorters, clerks and mainte- 
nance. For an appiicalion 
and exam information 
1-219-736-9807 
Ext. P9509 
aa.m. - 8 p.m., 7 days. 



CONSTRUCTION: HIRING all 
phases now, exoeterf pay, tionus, 
pa)d living and Iravet expenses, 
(musi reiocsale). Call nowl 407- 
64S2140 Ext. 100. 9-8 EST. 

COVENANT TRANSPORT 
NOW HIRING OTR 
DRIVERSThe best team pay In 
the Indusliy, 27-29c per mite. 
Age 23/ school 9 months OTR 
Longevity bonus, nrolol/ tayover 
pay, taacSng^nJoadhg/deadhead 
pay, paid Insurance. CALL 
RECRUrriNG VIC OR MARIE, 
1-60O-441-4394. 

DRIVERS- SOLO AND TEAM. 
Up to 26 cents per mile, OTR 
experience required, reefer 
experienced helpful, extra 
drop/untoadtng pay. Group 
medical plan. Apple Lines, Inc. 
BQ0/B43-B308. 

OTR DRIVERS TIRED OF THE 
SAME OLD GARBAGE? WANT 
TO DRIVE A NICE TRACTOR? 
WORK Wn"H GOOD PEOPLE 
AND GET GOOD BENEFITS? 
CALL 600-235-8267 E.O.E. 



CREDIT 
jlSSISTflNT 

Major Corp. seeks 
previous experience 
in credit dcpt., cou- 
pled with great 
organizational skills. 

244-0016 



jperior J]cr»DnncL 



SECRETARY 

for CPA Firm. 

Typing, word process- 
ing and comnnunica- 
tion skills essential 
Siiorthand a plus. 
Send resume to: 

DAVID CAIN Jr. 
Milburn Cain & Co. 

4237 Grove Ave 
Gurnee, IL 60031 



MULTI-LINE |; 
?iRESIDFNT CLAIMS; 
^REPRESENTATIVE^ 

For Northern Cook.^ 

County Suburbs ^ 

p and Lake County | 

^ Minimum 3 years '^l 

experience 

Send Resume To: 

•3.0 Box EE 

[do Lakeland Newspapers^ 

P.O. Box 268 '^ 

Graytlake.lL 60030"^ 




Professional 
Direct Care 

FULlrTIME 

or PART-TIME 

MULTIPLE SHIFTS 

Do you want the satis fac- 
tion of using your skill and 
experience in a truly needed 
way? 

For 37 years GLENKIRK 
has served children and 
adults with developmental 
disabilities in the North 
Shore community. During 
this period we have estab- 
lished a proud reputation 
both with our staff and 
with our clients. 

If you arc looking for an 
environment to share your 
skills and abilities with ■ 
people who appreciate you 
GLENKIRK is the place for 
you. We have a variety of 
positions available. . 

Fax your resume to: 
708/272-7350. or call.Ruth 
at 708/272-5111 ext. 215 
(a.a./e.o.e.) 



SNOWPLOW 

BOBCAT 

Owner Operators. 

Needed by North- 
shore company. 
Top Pay, Pd. gas, 
guar, hours, plenty 
of work, no wait for 
your moneyl 

(708) 17X-1747 



3 Child Care 
Workers 

needed for drop 

in program in 

North Chicago and 

Waukegan. 5 hours 

per week. May bring 

own children to work. 

Call Carol at: 

(708) 587-6655 

Cnildserv 

EOE 



THE mNNlNG TEAM 

rtou 

r^NO THE 
'/CLASSIFItDS 

jcr YOU 
IwnenEfou 

TOGO 




loewl Mivicet 

Glenkirk 



CHIROPRACnC 
. ASSISTANT 

Libertyville doctor 
needs positive, moti- 
vated, responsible 
self starter for front 
office duties which 
include patient rela- 
tions, insurance filing, 
billing and assisting 
the doctor. 

House ca/e experience 
preferred. 

Typing & Clerical Skills 
Necessary 

Call: 
680-4777 



[(708) 




IlelpWanted, 
FuU-Time 



STYLIST 

Ri & Part tine in modem, 
beamiti, busy saton. Appty 
WINn:OFFBIK)AmUY. 

4949 Grand Ave., 
(Rtes.132&21j,Gum'ae,L 

(70B)662-€601- 



HEPAIR PERSON 

Must be able lo woi1( wllh 
EPDI^^ Rubber, built-up Roor, 
Curb Ftashlngs & Emergency 
Leaks. Clean Driving Record a 

MusL Competitlvs salary. 

Sand Resume lo: P.O. Box 3t, 

Saukville, Wl 53080 



SNOWPLOW 

& DRIVERS 

Wanted 

Drivers or owner operators to 
plow commercial accounts. 

Great Pay 
Guaranteed Hours 

North Suburbs 
Call Bob or leave message: 

(708) 634-9300 




ti Ivor handicap* 

AREYaU 
A PLANT 
LOVER? 

Ma|or service company 

looking for customer 

service oriented people 

to core for tropical 

plants In offices, malls, 

etc. Must have own car. 

Good salary, benefits, 

bonuses, car expenses. 

Full training. 

Call: 

(708)6344109 



■aaaBHflaciBaBCiGiaH 

BR0UII B 

SSALESASSOaATESg 

g Full & Pan Time g 

^Premier ahoe retailer hasg 
aexcltlng opportunities for[g 
ticaraer-orlentod Individuals ton 
ajoln our BuccasBlul corrpanyB 
Band grew with U8) B 

B a 

BCandldaloB (or Iho lull tImeB 
BposltlorB mu&t bo avalt^le toB 
B work days. Appllcant6 Inleresl-B 
Red in wortdng part time muslS 
StH available lo worit a llexlblan 
nBchedule. Previous retail S 
Qiexperlence Is a plus, but weg 
Bare wiling to I rain. g 

B a 

a We ofter ■ corrpetklve wage.B 

a generous merchandise dle-B 
counhi and f ul benellts for fun B 
Btlma employesa. Including B 
Bheattli, dental, life and LongB 
gTerm OlBablllly insurance.g 
S401K, paid vacation. and hoN-s 
gdaya. g 

n Please apply In penton: a 

B BANISTER SHOE B 
B Gumee Mills g 
B 6170 W.Grand Ave. a 
3 Suite 383 g 

a Gumee, IL 6031 a 

g •(pjd cpponLrtty •mployar nVlU/V g 

■BaaaBBBaaBBBBBB 




HelpWanled 
Full-Time 




HelpWanled 
Full-Timc 



lAFPOUVmtlNTM'lEKSl 

Earn up to $12.00 

pm hour 

OurOffIco 

(708) 913-9051 



□HBoyBHBBBBHaaByaaD 
3 SHEET METAL g 
g FOREMAN g 

a ExperiencQd, Standing o 
B Seam, Rooting & " 

Mangards. 
Competitive wages 

1 



Short Order Cooks 
Full or Part Time 

Contact: 
The Lantern 

234-9844 



a Manaards. c 

gCall: 1-B00-876-634Og 

anHHOHHnnP3BDHHHHt3HD 



ilDVERTlSESTG SALES 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest 
weekly newspaper group, is seeking an 
Advertising Account Executive. The candidate will 
be responsible for field sales calls, developing a 
key area in Lake County and must possess excel- 
lent skills in interpersonal communication, creativi- 
ty and personal responsibility. The candidate 
must also be self mdlivatod and able to work with 
minimal amount of supen/ision, enjoy variety and 
be able to handle multiple tasks. An automobile is 
necessaiy (gas compensation will be made.) If 
you are professional, energetic and possess all of 
the above characteristics we are interested in talk- 
ing to you. A candidate should have previous 
sales experience. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 
. (708) 223-8161 



1 



HALL MONITOR 

Bilingual adult preferred 

Evening hours 
5 p.m. - 1 0:30 p.m. 

on days whert 
school is in session 

• Hourly Rats 

• Some Benefits 

Applications are 

available in the 

Administrative Of&ce 

Muodelein High School 
1350 W.Hawley Street 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

S6 



SOCIAL 

WORKER 

DESIGNATE 

For long term car© 

facility. Full time 

w/benefits package. 

Experience a plus, 

but not necessary. 

Contact: 

Becky Moore 

(708) 295-3900 



FINANCIAL 
ANALYST 

Roy F. Wsston, Inc., a leading 

nationwide fiil-tenlM wvtronmen- 1 

N constiling and ccnttnidion llrm, | 

has a record of confinued ^owlh 

that has aealed en excellent 
opportmlty fof aRnanda) Aflalyit, 
AppilcanI Ehould have an undef - 
groduste degree in a bitslnass di- 
dpilne wish 1 -2 years o( experience | 
In (he envlronmefilai or ccnslruc- 
Uon Induttfy, Experience In project " 
finavdal cont/olt and proajtement [ 
ara preferred. Famllarfty with 
LOTUS 1-2-3 ic necessary, 
WESTON oHers excellent sdaries, 
compellUve tMneAtt and an excep- 
tional work environment. Rease 

tend yotf resume avi salary 

requirement lo: Roy F, Wee ten, 

Inc., 3 Hawlhcrn PaAway, SUIe 

400, Vernon Hills, IL 60061. Attn: 

Human Resources Dcflt. 

(MWCRSD) Equal Oppofluilly 

Employer. M/F/V/H, 

ROY F. WESTON 



CREDIT 
ffNflLYST 

From Fnance oo. 

Working Knowledge 

o(6al£UK» Sheets 

P&LSlatemerts 

Unii. Commercial Codes, 

B.S. Degree - Top Pay 

244-0016 



ASSEMBLERS 

We are in need of 
assemblers for the 

assembly of 
electronic products. 

Experience in 
soldering and the 

assembly of 

electro-mechanical 

products a must. 

Apply at; 

Danaher Controls 
1675 Delany Road 
Gumee, IL 60031 



SNOWPLOWERS WANTED 

- Drivers - Shovel ers 

Own Personal Truck Not Necessary 

Excellent Starting Pay. 

Mostly Nights Call: 
708-304-6773 



BODBBHaHBHBBHBHBHHBSBBBBaBaBIl 

B FULL TIME REPORTER 3 

D Lakeland Newspapers is expandingn 
D its editorial staff and looking for a a 
g full time reporter. Responsibilities g 
g include covering night time village ^ 
g board meetings and taking photos, q 
n We are looking for someone with g 
n enthusiasm, experience and ability a 
D to meet deadlines. Please call a 



n 

D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
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n 



Bill Schroeder, 
General Manager 

(708) 223-8161 



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BAJSfKING 

We are a large, established credit union seeking an 
experienced individual to fill our Financial Services 
Supen/isor position. Selected applicants will possess: 

• Knowledge of financial services, policies, and 
procedures Including inveslmenls, 

• Strong interpersonal sitills to discuss sensitive 
financial situations bo\h In person and by telephone 
and high level confidenliality abilities. 

• PC/CRT fainiliarlty, good typing skills (min 40 
WPM), and a background of clerical abilities. 

• Excellent communication skills, written and verbal, 
and good organizational ability. 

• Ability to motivate, encourage, and assist staff to 
provide outstanding member sen/Ice. 

We offer pleasant, professional work conditions, 

a good starting salary and benefits package. 
For consideration please apply in person at: 

GREAT LAKES CREDIT UNION 

2525 GREEN BAY ROAD 

NORTH CHICAGO IL 60064 

E.O.E., SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT 




HelpWanled 
Full-Timc 




& LABORERS 

Rubber & Hot Tar. 

Experience Preferred. 

Will Train. Call: 

1-800-876-G340 



HOME TYPISTS, 
PC uMri n««d«il< 

$35,000 potential. Details. 

Call 1-805.962-8000 
Ext. B-4458. 



CUSTODIANI 

Needed 

Round Lake 

Area Schools 

Contact 

Mary Anne Heinrichsl 

(708)546-8913 




NECHflNrC 

Experienced in 

servicing diesel 

and gas engines. 

Nordstrom ttw 

Experts Co. 

WHUCONM 

(708)526^858 



J TRAIN TO BE J 

V ANANNT Z 

* Dream Jobs ^ 

JWust Speak English J 
^ChUd care experience^ 

• Excellent references ^ 

I^Live In or come & go^ 

J $250.00 - $350.00/wk J 
^ NON-SMOKER ^ 

;(708) 432-6111; 



GRAPHIC ARTS - TWO POSITIONS j 
IBM/MAC Ace I 

Northern Lake County graphic arts co. has Immediate I 
position for multi>talented, electronic graphic pro In our I 
expanding electronic publishing dept. Must have min, 2 j 
years working experience with DOS/ WINDOWS focusing 
in Ventura, Pagemaker, Corel, Freelance, lJ\N procedures, 
scanning, system malnt. and AGFA hi-res imagesetters 
experience desired. NfAC knowledge a deQnIte-)-. 

GRAPHIC ARTS DESIGNER i 

Traditional board designer lo work within a range ofbud- j 
gets. Corporate design and computer knowledge a+. j 
Keyline/paste-up necessary. 

For Immediate response send (FAX 708/662-41 40) or write;] 
I resume, cover letter and salary requirements to: j 

I Personnel Dept., 

1400 St. Paul, Gurnee, IL 60031 




Is the largest growing subsidiary of 
Pepsl-Co. Is now accepting resumes for. 

•Assistant Managers 
•Shift Managers 

Competitive salary and Great Benefits! 
Please Apply in Person at the following locations: 

150 E. Dundee 1597 N. Rand Rd. 
1^ Wheeling. IL Palatine, IL i^ 



IBBDDBBBBBBBBBDBeSBBI 
1 BANKING OPPORTUNITIES I 

]Have you thougiit about apptying for a position in a cm-| 
Jative, team-oriented, caring financial institution? II so,! 
1 please conakier the foikiwing oppodunilies.' i 

j CLERKS I 

1 1mmediate M\ and part-time openings for Indivkluals with! 
: excellent customer service and verbal and handwritten! 
I communication skills. Prior cledcal and CRT bachoroundl 
lis a plus. We have openings In various departments.! 
]There are two positions In our Member Servle«| 
j Department for swUchboand operators which require excet< I 
■ lent interperaonal and clerical skills and involves a high! 
j degree of member contact by telephone. The duties forj 
I the position In our Item Procetslng Department Include! 
J clerical and support functions and operation of the Unisys! 
JDPSOO; experience In proof or operations wouki be help-j 
jful; will train qualified applicant Excellent I0key skills. i 
iThe position in our Flninclai Strvicea Dopartmenl! 
I requires excellent Interpersonal and clerical skills andj 
1 Involves a high degree of member contact. Thete po«l<! 
jllons have ■ minimum aUrtlng ailary of S6.00 par! 
]hour. i 

! TELLERS I 

] Immediate full time openings for Individuals with heavy! 
] cash handling experience and excellent customer senrlce | 
jsKitla. Prior teller experience Is preferred. Expeflancedl 
j tel Wa will start at $7.00 per hour. j 

jwe offer a professional and friendly work environment as I 
jwell as a competitive salary and benefits package.! 
] Compensation will be based upon experience. No tele-j 
] phone calls please. Send resume to or apply In person at I 

j GREAT LAKES CREDH* UNION ! 
] 2525 GREEN BAY ROAD S 

] NORTH CHICAGO, IL 60064 I 

j E.O.E.. SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT I 

IBBBBBBBBBBEBBBBBBBI 



38 Lak«(and N«wipap*fi 



Friday, November 6. 1992 



^••i«f«i««^|««rfhwt9^£Ml!'tlUea!ailMffV»4«^ 



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llelpWanted 
Full-Ttme 



TELEPHONE WORE 



Part or Full Time 

$6 to $8 an Hour 

No Experience 

Necessary 

Chance for 

Advancement 

GRAYSLAKE 

708-223-1939 



ACTIVITY AIDE 

FT and PT (weekend) 

positions for reliable and 

outgoing people, who 

en)oy working wilh the 

ejderty. Good writing 

skills a must. 

Contact 

Michelle Ritchie 

(708) 295-3900 



COOK 

Long term health 
care facility locat- 
ed in Long Grove 
has need for a 

P.M. cook. 

Hospital cooking 

experience helpful. 

^'?ntact Marta: 

C70S) 438-8X75 

9 a*ni* - 4 p«m* 

Men* - Frl« 



RECORDS 
CLERK 

Hours 

Monday-Friday 

9:30-6:00 

Experience Preferred 

Good Communication 

Skills a Must 

.Good Starling Salary 

Excellent Benefits 

Call: 

(708) 362-7050 

For Appt. 



Part and Full Time 

Must be bright, friendly and work 
accurately with figures. 
Please Apply In Person 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



Rt. 83 



Grayslake, IL 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



OFFICE POSITIONS 

Long Term Temp Assignments 

• Word Processors • Data Entry 

• Secretaries • Switchboard 
■ Customer Service 

H you have experience In a corporate onvironmont and a minimum o< 
e months lo 1 yoaf oxporlenco on any of Iho (ollowfng: WordPartea 
5.1, Lolus-Advanoedi Micfosoti Word (or Windovrt or Always IBM or 
Madntoeh. Ws can assign you to long and short term tamp positions 
al exoetlont client lirms. We oHer top pay. holiday & vacation tnnQllis, 
free croGB-tralning on ilate-ot-the-an eotiwaro and the opporiuntiy to 
be hired lerrp-to-perm. 

Call De at: 708/634-6622 
PAIGE TEMPORARY INC. 

Vernon Hills 



ISrOTICE 
VHvlAGE OF GURISEE 

TtiB civil Service Commission of the Village of Gumee will be 
coriducling an examination (or original appoinlment for tlie 

Kosillon ol MalntsnancQ Man I for Ihe Village o( Gumee Public 
/orks Department. 

Applicants must tie at least 18 years of age, be a citizen of ihe 
United Slates, be ol good moral character, be ol good physical 
condlKon, and be a high school graduate or possess an equiv- 
alent degree. Appilcanis will be required to submit to and pass 
Si written examination, an oral Interview, and a medical examl- 
natton. 

Applications are available at the Village ot Gumee Municipal 
Building, 325 North O'Plalne Road, Gumee, Illinois 60031. 
And may be piclced up between 8:00 a.m. and 5;00 d.m. 
Properly completed applications musl be received no later 
than 5:00 p.m. on Friday November 20, 1992 at the Village ot 
Gumee Municipal Building. 

Starting Salary $9.89 per hour 
equal opportunity employer m/f 



CREDIT & COLLECTIONS 

We are a large, established credit union 

seeking an experienced individual to handle 

a full range of collection responsibilities. 

Selected applicants will possess: 

•Proven Collection abilities in a financial setting. 
•Strong Interpersonal skills to discuss 

sensitive financial situations both in 

person and by telephone. 
•Familiarity with lending and collection 

policies and procedures. 

•Typing skills (min. 40WPM). 

•Proficient 10-key skills 

We offer pleasant, professional woik conditions, a good 

starting salary and opportunities for continued grow/lh. 

For consideration please complete application 

including salary requirements at: 

GREAT LAKES CREDIT UNION 

2525 GREEN BAY ROAD 

NORTH CHICAGO IL 60064 

E.O.E, SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT 




HelpWanted, 

Full-Ttme 



Nl F«thral of 
Opportanitiesi! 

TeleiTiajteting -....-,..$14,500 

Data Entry .......415,000 

Accounting CM ..-.418.000 
Admia Assistant .....120,000 
iTravalAgert -.428,000 



244-0016 



rr 



■The Village of Aniioch isg 
9now accepting appllca-5 
Btions for future employ- ■ 

■ ment. Qualifications:! 
■class 1 Waste Water* 
^Treatment license and J 
■experience with industrial ■ 

■ pre- treatment preferred. ■ 
JJApp (cations can be 9 
Eobtalned al the S 

gVILUGEolANTlOCHS 

B 874 Main St. S 

■ Anttoch, IL 8 

■ Resumes accepted it mailed ■ 
■lo: Village ol Aniioch, 874 ■ 
Sh4ain St.. Antioch, IL 60002,5 
■ATTN: Mike Ruxton.a 

■ Superintendent - Sower &■ 
■Waier. ' J 

xzxxxxxzxxxxzzzx 
I SUBSTITUTE | 
I BUS DRIVERS | 

I CDL & Stick I 
I preferred but not | 
X required. Will | 
X train rigfit person. | 
X r\/iust be 21 & I 
I have a clean | 
I record of 3 years x 
I - no violations, z 

X Interested candidates z 
X Apply in person: x 
|811N. Sunset { 

I NO PHONE CALLS \ 
i PLEASE i 

xxzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 




Opp<»srt»uni±i^s 



Secretary/ 

MiULFlI£Cl£RK 

Gurnee Office 

We currently tiave 2 full 
time positions available 
for individuals with excst- 
lent general office, typ- 
ing, and mail & records 
processing skills. 
At State Farm, you can 
took forward to an excel- 
lent starting salary, merit 
increases and a top tien- 
elit package. 
Contact Personnel 

(708) 941-2424 



^t 



StoteFonn Insurance 

Equal Oppoitunly Enptoyer 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



VAULT 
ATTENDANT 

American National Bank 
of Ubertyvlile.aieaderin 
the banking industry cur- 
rently Is seeking a lull 
time vault attendant. 

Ttie qualified candidate 
will have excellent cus- 
tomer contact skills, 
accurate typing skills 
and knowledge ol a PC 
helpful. 

We oiler a competHlve 
salary and comprehen- 
sive beneltl package. 

Contact 

Juiie Easterhouse 

(708)816-4288 



American National Bank 

ofUtxTtyvillc 

1201 S. Milwaukee Ave. 

Utiertyvilte, IL 60048 

Equal OpporlunKy Employer 



J 



Full and Part Time 

SALESPEOPLE 

►Setl-motivated, people oriented, friendly & hard working. 
' Building product knowledge helpful. 

Apply In Person 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



Rt83 



Grayslake, IL 

An Equal Opportunity Empioyor 



ilMiiiliiffiiiErSRi 



Uuildcrs 



Firewood 



^UY NOW & SAVE j 

up to 10% off during S 

FALL SALE ▼ 

• Decks • Garages W 
• Remodeling \f 

• Custom Homes U 
Call Today: Z 



TRIPLE "A" 
BUILDERS 



J 



(708) 223-7900 S 

^ Over 20 yrs. experience J 



Etiucation/ 
InslrucLion^ 



Sll 



STRINQ INSTRUMENT mutic 
lessons, Violin, Viola, Cello, 
Certified teacher. Call 
(708)548-1B€0 In Grayslake. 



Firewood 



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FIREWOOD UNUMtTED 
Soason 2 years 

Free delivery & stact<ing 
Mixed tiardwoords $60 F.C. 
Oak $65 

Cheriy, Birdi. Hickwy $75 
Discount on 
2 or more 
Call anytime 
(708)888-0102 



FIREWOOD 

FIREWOOD 

$45 Mixed 
Hardwoods per F.C 
$60 All Oak per F.C 
Free ^ ^ 

Delivery! ^ 
Free ^Kiss: 
mndling! ^^iSsk^^ 

(IF NO fiNSWER. 

PLEflSE LEfiVE 

fi MESSfiGEj 



FRIENDLY 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned 

hardwood 
•Oak 'Ash 'Maple' Hickory 

$59.00 per PC 

Free Stacking & Delivery 

Buy the wood 

that burns 

guaranteed! 

C708) 549^710 




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mr\ 



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Occupational Therapist 

Professional 

Fersoiufied! 

Opportunity 

Reasonable case load 

Team focused 

U nequaled growth 

N ovel depaitmoit 

I mpact position 

TaKe a chance! 

You can..... 

make a tflllerencB. Full lime 

(PT considered) position lor 

tn/Outpatienl and acuta rehab 

laxp: preferred. Excel. 

pay/bsra. 

UBUIQIFiVltiCOilUITYNOSm 

P.O. BOX 8992 
AUBURN. CA 95604 
(916) B6S-4S25 EOE 



RN 

FULL TIME 

Expanding long term 

care facility located 

in Long Grove has 

need of a nurse for 

11 pm-7 am shift. 

Good benefits and 

competitive salary. 

Call Nancy at 
(708) 438-8275 
M-F 9 am - 5 pm 



zxzzzzzzxzzzzz 
I DON/ADON I 

S position available |n S 
X. ioiig term care facility j 
Z in northern suburbs. Z 
S Stnsng leadership and S 
X experience preferred, x 

I Call: I 

I (708) 295-3900 1 

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ 



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Medical Opportunities 

CNA'S 

Part Time Positions 

Available 
7-3 & 3-11 SHIFTS 

MAY WORK WEEKENDS 
ONLY, if dsaired • SS.B4/hour 
plus 3>11 and W0«kond difteren 
Hals. Orienlallon bagins 
Novomber 10 end 11. 

Subm'rt applicaluns Id: 

Jim Adams 

Pereonnel Manager 

1 125 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Llbertyville,IL 60048 

equal opportunity employer 



NURSING 
SUPERVISOR 

Group Health Cooperative, a 

progressive staH model HMO 

localed in Madison, Wl has a 

challenging position available 

lor a Nursing Supeivisor to 

manage the Nursing slalf at 

three clinic locations. Our din 

ics offer primary care as well 

as specialty sen/ices. 

Qualilicallons Include a 

Bachelor ol Science degree In 

[pursing & a license to practice 

in Ihe State ol Wisconsin as a 

registered nurse. Candidates 

musl have 3-5 yrs. ol related 

nursing experience In aclinic 

setting & have defnonslralsd 

excellent adminislraliva & 
supervisory skills. The ability 

to relate well to stall & a 

strong desire to provide high 

quality customer service Is 

essentia]. A roaster's degree 

In a health-related fieW Is 

desirable. II you leel that you 

would be an asset to Group 

Health by holding this key 

position, please call to request 

Ihe required application al 

(608) 251-4156 ext. 409. 

Equal Opportunity/ 
Artirmative Action ErrployBr 



CRTA's 

Full Time 

Expanding long 

term care facility 

located in Long 

'Grove has need ofi 

nurses for all 

shifts. Good 

benefits and 

I competitive salary. 

Call ajancjr at 

I (708) 438-82751 

Mon.-Fri., 9 am -5 pm 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Immediate 

openings for 

DIRECT 
CARE 

WORKERS 

FULL OR 
PART-TIME 

To Work WItli 

Severely Mentally 

Retarded Women. 

Willing to train for 

positions. 

Contact Sister Arlene 
(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT ST. 
JOSEPH'S 

Lake Zurich 



Lakeland classlf^lcds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 




llanciyman 



HOME REPAIRS, CAHPEhfTRy, 

etectrteal. kJlchen and tjaihrooms. 
Installs; Ibrtures, taucels, fans, 
garage door openers, water 
healers, windows, doors, FREE 
estlmalea. (708) 546-3177 



I'rofcBBional 
ScrviccB 



S31 



CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEA! 
Transler your home movies, 
slides or snap shots onto 
VIDEO, Call Tim (708)546- 
2774. 

S31-TF-49 



Housekeeping 



S16 



CLEANING, i WILL CLEAN 
your housa OR apartment at 
reasonable rates In Central 
Lake Cour.ty. References 
available. Call Barb anytime 
(708)223-7401 

S16-TF-28 
TOP OF THE LINE 
CLEANING SERVICES- Our 
own supplies. Call lor tree 
Estlmales. New construction- 
Residential- Apartment- Move- 
In/Move-out. (708)546-6819 
Leave message. 

R1fi-45-8 ^^^^ 

Painting/ 



S25 



SNOWPLOWING 
Residential & 
Commercial 

Call: Mike 
708-249-7619 



Resumce 



S37 




WORD PROCESSING 
Papers, resumes 'lull service 
available* or Anything you may 
need Prepared Prolessk>nally. 
Reasonable. Accurate! 

(708)578-0864. 

S37-45-50 



RN SUPERVISORS 

North suburtMn long 

lenn care facili^ 
seeks RN with man- 
agement sluUs. All . 
shifts. Salary 
negotiable. Call 

(708) 295-3900 



RN 
LPN 

Full or Pari Time 

Evening & Night Shift 

Call for intorview 

HIGHLAND 

HONE 

Genoa City, Wl 
(414)279-3345 



DIRECT 
CARE 

NtlGHT 
SHIFT 

(9p.m.-6.a.m.) 

Work with 

severely ^nd 

profoundly 

mentally retarded 

women. Contact 

Sister Arlene 

Mount St. Joseph 
Lake Zurich 



RN/LPN 

Openings left for 
Nigtit Shift, part/full 
time and weekend 

position open for 

RN/LPN. If 
interested, contact 

Sister Mary 

D.O.N. 

MOUNT 

ST. lOSEPH 

(708) 4384050 

Inactive or Retired 
Nurses Welcome 



Storage 



^ 



STORAGE FOR BOATS, 
R V ' ■ and cars, 
Wadsworth/Gurnee area. 
(708)336-3498. 

S4W5-51 



Miaccllancou 



^^H 



FIREPLACE MANTELS, 
Mads to order. Original 
designs. Samples. 6'xS*, Oak, 
$155. Pine $80. Call Ron's 
Spsclal Woods (708)223- 
5087 after 5pm, 

S49-51-4 

MAC'S STARTING AflO 
SNOWPLOW SERVICE. 
24hrs. service. Pho e 
(708)740-2074 Mob ;e 
(708)977-4364. 

S49-5M62 



Decorating 

QUALITY PAINTING AND 
Decorating. Complete 
decorating service. Taping, 
wallpaper, painting Interior or 
exterior. Commercial and 
residential. (708)33&-9080, 
S25-45-48 



ProrcHBiunal 
ServiccB 



iS3 1 



SERVE EVERYONE 



ALL THINGS MADE NEW 
UPHOLSTERYI Chrisimaa Is 
Commlngi Give your furniture 
a new look before the 
holldaysl Call (708)546-2774 
Free pick-up and Delivery. 
S31-TF-87/G 




Friday, Novomber 6, 1 992 



|j3keland Newspapers .' 



' ffnnT^'fSsif^' 



dfflrteir*^?et 






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9 



Opporlunilicfl 

"LOG HOME DEALERSHIP" 

Top Log Home Manutaclurer, 
seeks dealer. Proleded territory, 
Mgh earning potential. lul traWnf 
and leads provided. Need no 
Werfere wfth prosert enptoymert 
Models starting al $9,690 
"Brenlwood Log Homes*' 
427Rlver Rock Blvd , 
Murtroesboro, TN 37129. 1-80C- 
264-LOGS(5647>. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS, New 
commercial- homo units. From 
$199.00. Lamps- Lotions* 
Accessories. Monthly payments 
low as SlB.OO. Cal today tree new 
color catalog. 1-800-22a-6292, 



mMONEY-HElP OTHERS 

Quality ol Life Solutions 

FulVPartTime 

Call: 

(708) 546-0361 

George Hach 



Work 
Wanlcd 




TOP OF THE LINE 
CLEANING SERVICES- Our 
own supplies. Call for Iree 
Estimates. New construction- 
Residential- Apartment- Move- 
In/Move-out. (708)546-6819 
Leave message. 



Child Care 



SITTER AVAILABLE. Will 

watch your child, full time only, 
In my McHenry home. Toys, 
fenced in yard, meals included, 
Know first-aid and CPR. For 
more Information call 
(815)344-7823 Ask lor Kathy. 

24-TF-7 . . 
WILL DO BABYSITTING In 
my Zion home on 20th Street, 
Monday - Friday. Clean home, 
nice neighborhood, meals can 
be included. (708)746-5650. 
24-45 -€7/6 

'OAKWOOD KNOLL MOTHER 

has one opening for 2 years or 
older Full time preferred, lunch 
provided. Linne (708)395- 
7083. 

24-45-163 
2 CHILDCARE OPENINGS Now 
avalable in my New Hound Lake 
Park home, 3days, (Mon-Wed- 
Fri). Call Pam (706)740-8550 

EXPECTANT MOTHER WILL 
walch your cMW 0-5yis, In her Fox 
Lake home. Morning lo evening 
hours, long term, reasonable 
rales. Many relerencas. Please 
can Dawn (708) 973-0062. 




MARKET GUIDE 



Schoolts/ 
InBlruction 



m 



^ 



BUY IT. 
SELL IT. 
FIND IT. 



CLASSIFIED 



BECOME A PARALEGAL JOIN 
AMERICA'S FASTEST 

GROWING PROFESSION. 
LAWYERS INSTRUCTED 
HOME STUDY. THE FINEST 
PARALEGAL PROGRAM 
AVAILABLE, P.C.D.I.. ATIANTA. 
GEORGIA. FREE CATALOGUE 
800-3S2-7070, depl. LM733. 




:Maai£EOPieimEi 



AntiqucB 



^ 




QUALITY ANTIQUES: 
Double bed with Inlaid wood, 
high-boy dresser, table with 
clawed feet,' Easliake dresser, 
all In excellent condition, 
Wauconda. (815)344-1878. 
1930'S, 1940'S FURNITURE, 
Wing back chair, $100 Lamp 
table, oak (Inish, S75. Ljarge drt3p 
leat table, oak llnlsh, $150. 
Bedroom chest/oak 1 inish. 
Negotiable. (706)662-6662. 

ANTIQUE HANDMADE 
WEDDING ring QUILT, $165. 
(708)249^4468. 

ANTIQUE HOOSIER KITCHEN 
cabinet, channing, Versatile, 
$450. excellent corxllllon, (815) 
344-1555 after 3:30pm. 

BORSATO 'PLAY GYPSY 
PLAY" 241nch higfi. Imlod edion, 
retail $18,000, will sell for $9,000 
(708)492-9444. 



Appliances 



WORKING WASHING 

MACHINE IN Good Condition 

$75.00 Please call (708)546- 

4933. 

WHIRLPOOL WASHER/ Gib 

dryer, super capacity, almond 
color, $300/3et. (708)362- 
527. 

CruflB 



Elccironics/, 

Com Du I era 

PERSONAL COMPUTERUKt 
Newl NEC brand. 286, 40 MB 
hard drive. 5.25 disc. VGA 
monitor, internal Modem 
Panasonic 24 PIN printer, 
Word perfect 5.1 Lotus 1-2-3, 
Comunicatlon software 
Included $1,100 or bast offer 
Rich (708)662-5884. 
36-45-165 
COMPUTERS-IBM 
COMPATIBLE. COMPLETE 
systems with harddrive, VGA, 
and monitors, baded and ready 
to mn from $500. 386 Special, 
complete systems. $799. with 
ptinter $975. All new. With 
warranty. Will build to suit and 
Upgrade present system. Will 
beat all other pHces loo. (708) 
689-0084. 



ffi 




Furm Cuide 



FARM EQUIPMENT; LOADER: 
intemalk>nal 2000 Wi60* bucket, 
mini condlllon. Mower: 
International 3polnl 5ft. sickel 
type. Manuer spreader Hawk 
bl modei 2195, I94cu.fl capacty 
(tail type. Horse trailer: 4011, 
gooserwck, needs work. Ctine 
Fann (815) 943::5592 



Firewo«>d 




9 



HOMESPUN & HEARTS hkHday 
Bazaar Thurs. Mov.5, 9-6pm Fri. 
Nov.6, 9-^m and Sat. Nov.7. 9- 
4pni 4D222 N. Green Bay Rd., 
Zfc>n. 



FIREWOOD- S5S P«r Fics 
cord, delivered. SI 45 tor 3. 
Stacking and kindling 
available, (708)546-2101 after 
6pm. 

38-45-47 





KleclrunicH/ 
Computers 



j^H' 



APPLE II GS, 1.25 Memory, 
(2) 5-i/4'drlve3, (2) 3-1/2" 
drives, imageWrlter, color 
printer, assorted soltware 
$1,500(708)546-9248. 
36-45-54 



Good Things 
To Eai 



APPLE AND CIDER, 

ANDERSON Farm Orchard, 
43195 Morth Green Bay Rd., 
Zlon. 2 milos north of Rt. 173. 
(708)872-2918 day of 
(708)872-7004 evea. 
41-46-10 

NEW INDOOR MARKET Now 
OPEN! Hours Fri. 8-8pm Sal. 
9-6pm, Sun. 10-5pm. Spaces 
also available. Located at 500 
North Green Bay Rd. Waukogan, 
(708)662-7900 



lIorscB & 
Tack 



1^9 



UorBGB & 

Tack 



1^^ 



i 

1 


1 

1 




P 


BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bate or 1 ,000 - Cash & Carry 
Hay, Straw & Horse Feed 

HORTON BROS. 

Bristol, Wl 

(414) 8S7-252S 

Mon.-Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-3 




Iloueeholde/ 
Furniture 



QUEEN EXTRA FIRM 
Mattress arKi box spring, name 
brand. Never Used. (Worth 
$550) Sell at S245. Will deliver 
(312)856-9078. 

43-47-4 
WATERBED- SUPER SINGLE 
mattress, liner, heater, frame 
with bookcase headboard, like 
new $200. (708)433-7061. 

43-45-5 
LADIES OAK VANITY (now 
Stanley) foldup mirror, glass 
top, lined drawers, upholstered 
bench, (Value S900) $520 firm. 
(708)949-0658. 

43-45-58 
TWIN SIZE WATERBED, 
good condition, mattress, 
liner, and heater Included. 
$350 or best oHer (708)395- 
5842. alter 4pm. 

43-45-59 
NEW FURNITURE Custom 
made (2) black loveseats with 
black anD white throw pillows, 
black and white chair with 
ottoman. Too big for Room, 
Paid $1,600 will sell for $950. 
Kay (708)548-1767. 

43-45-155 ■ 
QUEEN ANNE STYLE 
bedroom, complete $1,100 
Dining room set, $1,700 
Cherry. Ail In Perfect condition, 
Must Sell I (708)406-0166. 

43-46-14 
BASSETT QUEEN Bedroom 
sal, triple dresser, chest, nile- 
stand, 1-yr. old. 31,200/ best 
ofler, (815)728-1164, 

43-45-143 
STEREO, ZENITH, Console, 
am/lm phonograph, 
cherrywood, excellent 
condition (708)438-7952. 

43-45-57 
SONY TRiNATRON 2T' color 
television, console model, 
walnut finish, excellent 
condition. $525. (708)263- 
6185. 

43-45-166 
KING SIZE WATERBED, 
complete $150/ best offer 
sheets and comforter $20. 
(708)546-2624 anytime. 



Lawn/ . 
Garden 




1986 GRAVELY TRACTOR, 
very good condition, lawn 
mower deck 48lnch, snow 
thrower, pull cart, $2,500; 
console TV 25lnch, RCA, 
$125. (708)526-2573. 

WHEEL HORSE GARDEN 
Tractor, o6fT|)felo with 42'Mowef, 
$800; intemallonal Cadet riding 
mower with lawn sweeper & 
fertilizer speader, excellent 
condllon $600; 16lnch HomeUe 
chain saw mns good, $75. (708) 
367-5462 



'^Q 



Mittccllancou 



NINTENDO LOVERS)! THE 
•Qriolnai" TETRIS game by 
Tengen, (banned from the 
maritet, now a Ccllectors Item) 
can be youra for $200.00 Still 
sealed In original package. Call 
(708)740-2789. LeSVO 
message. 

45-33/TF-OO 

1992 ENCYLOPEDiA sat, 

Major Brand, top quality, new 
In box, origlnaily Si ,200 Must 
eeli $295. (708)860-0585. 

45-45-35 
SINGLES MEMBERSHIP 
Selling membership to 
sucessfui meeting place for 
professionals. Must be over 
21.(708)362-6580. 

45-45-144 
SICK AND TIRED OF YOUR 
CABLE GOING OUT & 
MISSING YOUR SHOWS and 
SPORTS GAMESl Buy ihis 
Super Startrok 8, 10tt. sallllte 
dish, with upgrades and 
wireless remote, S2,000, 
ALSO, SOtnch cool cam screen 
TV (Just like being at ihe 
movies) $3,000 (708)546- 
2981. 

45-45-114. 
BIANCHI WEDDING GOWN, 
Preserved, size 6/8, Includes 
headpiece, Paid $1,350, 
asking $550 or best oiler 
.(708)548-1337. 

MOVING- MUST SELLI 
9*4-3/4' bookcase headboard, 
hutch, and chest dresser, tri- 
bed. canopy bed, dining room 
table and 6 chairs and china 
cabinet (414)857-2909 II not 
home, leave message. 

45-45-82 




flouBcholde/ 
Furniture 



(2)BUILT4N ELECTRIC Tappan, 
selt-cJoanlng ovens, top-oi-the- 
llne. Free JonnAIre cooklop with 
purchase, $400. (708) 295-1730. 

4 PIECE BRAND new Hardwood 
honey pine 'dinette sel, excellent 
condition. Windsorback chairs, 
pedestal table. 'Imonlh Paid. 
$398, sell $225. (708)623-5404. 

9 PIECE DINING Room SET. 
Queen Anne, exquisite 
Cherrywood, Value $3,400. 
SACRIFICE $1,975 Never 
U5Od.(70B) 374-^0203 - 

BARSTOOLS, TABLES AND 

chairs, Roland MP700 electric 
piano. (414)657-8681 

DINETTE SET-NEVER USED, 
charming country kitchen table 
w/Inlald lop 4/6 chairs, $295. 
MATTRESS set, queen, never 
used, deluxe pllbw top. Value 
$595. SACRIFICE $360. also 
X-tra linn mattress set. $260. 
BRASS head and tootboanJ. 
$190.C7Q6) 374-0203 

DING SET. SOUD Pecan paiqUGl 
top, (6) chairs. 2-pc. hutch sel, 
$750.(708)680-4684 

FURNITURE (2)0VERStZED 
CHAIRS, 1 with ottoman, 1 
reclner, country style, blue, $150 
each, excellent condltton (l)njst 
country style couch. $150. (708) 
223-1255. 

MODERN OAK BEDROOM sal. 

$600, While Formica kilchen 
table with 4 yoltow chairs, $1 25. 
Easy chair with ottoman, $125. 
after 4:43pm (414) 942-1983. 

OLDER RCA WOODEN console 
color TV. excellent condlllon, 
(newer picture tube) $100A)est 
olfer(708) 740-2278 

SOFA AND LOVESEAT. 

Beautiful custom made, exoelent 
quality, unused, Ori^nal $1,400. 
Sacrtfk». $750. (708)940-1646. 



Lawn/ 
Garden 




TRBE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 
Nordstrom l^e 

EiqpertsCo. 

(Fully Insured) 

708-526-0858 



Mieccllancou 



^^M 



November Special 

10 Pounds of Thistle Seed - 750/lb. 
WadswortK Feed & Saddlery 

1 5250 Wadsworth Road 
708-662-2932 




MuBical 
InstrumenlB 

BABY GRAND S'3'* EBONY. 
Howard made by Baldwin. 
Excellent condition $4,500 
(312)736-2176. 

46-45-172 



Pels & 
SupplicB 




FetB & 
SuppUcB 

GREAT DANE PUPPIES- 

2 litters, top quality black, fawn 
and brlndle AKC. Shots., 
warmed, champion bloodlines. 
(414)248-2597 After 5pm. Ask 
for Sandy. 

47-TF-a3 _ 
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERDS, 

3 males iell. 6 weeks old 
(708)587-9508, 

47-45-11 
GERMAN WIRE HAIR Pointer 
Pup, AKC, versatile hunter, 
family companion, born 
8/24/92 Reac^ to goi Vaccines, 
worming, tails and claws 
removed. (414)763-8437. 

47-45-12 
ROTTWEILER MALE AND 
Female puppies, large boned, 
champion bloodlines $600 
(414)361-4837 leave message. 

47-45-13 
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP. 
AKC, import lines, ist shots, 
wormed, targe boned, excellent 
family and protection breeding. 
Guaranteed! $300 (414)635- 
4618. 

47-45-14 
BIRD / DOG- 3 yr OLD 
CitRllna Macaw, hand ted as 
baby by us, very atledlcnate, 
limited vocabulary. Inlcudes ' 
large cage. 31,800 ALSO 
female Shepherd, not spayed, 
never bred, beautllui darl< 
maridngs, good with kids. $250 
(708)546-2894 after 6pm. 

47-45-15 
BOXER PUPS- NEED 
someone that will love you for 
iite7 (3) males, talis dewclaws, 
shots and papers. Bom 9/5/92 
$350/each (414)652-2562. 

47-45-16 
(6)PUPPIES, £wk8 OLD, 
Lhasa Apso, $10'0/ea 
(708)546-3971. 

47-45-17 
SMOOTH FOX TERRIER- 7 
yr. old male, housetrained, 
•Great with children" $50. 
(815)344-2275. 
__ 47-45-18 

GRiiAT PYRENEES pups- 
AKC champion bloodlines. 
Parents on premises. 
(815)459-4671. 

47-TF-54/G 
2 yr.old AFRICAN GREY 
Congo, semi lame and talking, 
great heallh and feather, cage 
and all accessories included. 
$550 or best offer. (708)680- 
9352. 

47-45-65 



VIETNAMESE POT BELLIED 

Piglets for sale. Adorable 
house pets. Mu3t bo seen to 
appreciate them. Easily house 
broken. Starting at $75.00 
(815)765-2215 Poplar Grove. 
47-45-87 

KITTENS AVAILABLE for 
adoption to good homes 
OhJLY. (708)265-0443 or 
(708)395-2020 Ask for Connie 
Wheeler. ' 

47-45-125 . 

(2)MALE BRINDLE BOXER 
puppies, 6wks oW. no papers, 
CaH(7Q8) 740-^866. 

BABY FERRET, $230 or best 
offer, wth cage and st^iples^TOS) 
395-0604 .__ 

CHOW-CHOW PUPPIES. AKC, 
$200. (708) 546-9593 



GERMAN SHORTHAIRED 
POINTER puppies, Field 
chanpton, AKC. (414) 652-2ia 
or (414)654-2511 

GOLDEN RETREIVER 

PUPPIES, AKC, shots, 
dowciawed, 2 males $200. 
(815)597-1066. I_ ' 

ROTTWEILLER PUPPIES AND 
Adults, AKC, large head and 
bones, al Gefinan $400 h> $1 ,500 
(312)737-5477. 

ROTTWEILLER PUPPIES. 
WHELPED 8/17/92. champion 
Gemwin & American bloodliribs, 
sJre & dam on premises, to C|ially 
show or pet home ONLYI 
$500.(708) 872-7436 after 5pm. 

-YELLOW NAPED AMAZON 
Parrot, tame and talking, 
reasonable, taking offers. 
DACHSHUND, 4yr. old male, 
good family pel. Reasonable, 
Offers. (708)215-1827. 




TooIk & 
[Vlachincry 



m 




TOOLS, REMODELING AND 
CARPENTRY (708) 949-5016 



Wanted 
To liuy 



SLOT MACHINES: WANTED 
to buy, any corxtlon or parts. Also 
okf Wurittzer Juke Boxes, and 
Nickelodeons. Paying cash. 
(706)985-2742. 

WANTED TO BUY from REGAL 
China employee's B. Cadillac 
Oecanlens. Call (708)824-1097 
John, after 4pm M-F (Sal/Sun by 
10am) 



I 



REAL ESTATE 



MATERNITY CLOTHES all 
sizes, both casual and 
business ck)thes. Look special 
while that special event is 
occuring, with my top quality 
used Maternity ciothes. 
(708)540-0945. 
COINS- PENNIES to 
DOLLARS Proof sets, and 
foreign (708)662-4787. 
PIZZA RESTAURANT 
CLOSING. Equipment for sale. 
(3) Blodgslt ovens, single 
decks, 2/w stone shelves, 
$300;' double pass dough' 
roller, $1 ,400; 6x8 Taico walk- 
In relrtgerator, $1,100; 4-head 
glacier pop dispenser with ice 
machine post mix, $400; 
Quasar microwave; 3x3 
stainless 3 shelf comer table. 
Prices reduced! Must Selii 
(708)587-4512 Joe. 
DINING ROOM SET. Chtnc 
cabinet', table with 8 chairs, 
$1,500 or best offer. Lawn 
mower, gas, $100 (708)295- 
6039 evenings/Weekends. 

45-45-170 • 
SEGA VIDEO GAME, 
Motorcycle Hang-on, excellent 
shape. Perfect for bar or 
basement, Coin operated. 
$2,500 New. Sell at $600 or 
best offer, (708)362-71 10. 

45-45-171 ■ 

MOVING SALE- 1967650 Jet SM 
$1,800 Piano, $250. Bathroom 
vanity and sink, $75, Wind 
surftKiard, $200, Men's Schwinn 
10-spood, $30. Humidifier, $20, 
bug light $20.(708) 587-5253 

ARCADE VIDEO GAMES lor 

Christmas. Call now lor best 
seiecltons. (708)662-6117. 



llomes 
For Sale 





LINDENHURST 
LAKEFRONT- 3 Ijedrooms. 2 
story, Contemporary. Large 
eat-in kitchen/ family room 
combination. finished 
basement $199,900 (708)356- 
1778. 

50-45-68 



Homes 
For Sale 



TWIN LAKES, WISC. Nvw 
Construction. 2 bedroom, 1 
bath. Raised Ranch, 
Expandable to 3 bedroom 2 
bath, Special low down 
financing $69,900 
BUSCHMAN'S (706)265-0203. 
50^5m 




IloniGB 

For Sale 



LIKE NEW 2 BEDROOM 



Remodeled 5 rm., 2 bedroom 
home on double lot wUh Great 
Pier & Lake rights. New washer, 
dryer, stove, refrigerator, 
microwave, kitchen, bathroom, 
carpeting, shed & driveway. 
Aiuminum siding & storm win- 
dows. Seller will add garage at 
cost. $74,900 

RE/MAX ADVANTAGE 



THREE BEDROOM home on 
Russell Rd. Beach Park 
schools. Close to Forest 
Preiserves. New furnace. Only 
$87,500 Call (708)395-8357 
for more details. 

SO-TF-ae/G 
CHARMING 1B90's 

MundeleIn home, Perfect 
starter house or combination 
home/business. Sun porches, 
hardwood floors, and 
mouldings. 2-story garage. 
$112,000(708)949-7951 

_ 50-45-129 
WON'T LAST LONQI 3 
bedroom ranch In McHenry 
has loo many features to 
mention, look at the price.. 
$99,900 (815)344-5954. 
50-45-67 

3BEDR00M HOME FOR Sale 
by owner. Fireplace, large yard, 
all appliances slay. Ready to 
move-in, a Must Seel $89,900 
(708) 587-8656. 

ANTIOCH-BY OWNER, 

BEAUTIFUL 3bedroom Ranch 
In qukjl wooded nelghtxirtyMd, 
targe attached garage, central atr, 
tireplace, huge deck to opllonal 
pool, lake rights, well kept. Must 
Seel $139,900 (708) 395-8627 

LINDENHURST-HILLTOP 
RETREAT, LOW maintenance, 
brfck ranch, 3-bedroom3, 1-1/2 
bath. 2-car attached garage, 
reoert root, aluminum son. fascia, 
seamless gutters, fenced yard, 
appliances. $112,5000 (708) 
356-9138. 

NEW HOME FOR SALE- 
Immedlate occupancy. 3 
bedroom, 2.5 batfts. 1900 sq. 
f1.. fireplace, 2,5 car garage, full 
basermnt. over 1 acre of land, 
$ 1 87.000. Wo have ol tier plans 
to choose (rom, your kit or ours. 
Call (708) 546-1866. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. 
3bedroom, 2 baths, c/a, to\a ol 
extras. Spacious home on 
wooded k)<, appraised al $106,000 
asking $97,900 for quick seilt 
No reallois. Prfc» goes UP wtwn 
we list With Realtors, 
(708)740-8689. leave message. 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 
from $1 (U repair). 

Daltnquent tax property. 

Repossessions. Your area 

1-B05-962-BO0O Ext. GH- 

4458 lor current repo list. 




Homes 
For Itcnt 



LAKE VILLA. 3/5 Bedroom, 
1-1/2 bath, family room with 
fireplace, large 2 car garage on 
double lot. istear beach, in Fox 
Lake Hills, NEW: furnace, 
water heater and relrlgerator, 
$1,000/mo. (708)973-0658 or 
(706)395-8465. 

51-45-19 
ANTIOCH- FOR RENT or 
OPTION to Buy. Lake Marie 
Resort area. Beautllui 
furnished Colonial home, 2 
story, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, i^^ 
ground swimming pool. 
Gazebo, 2 car garage, boat 
house on 1.7 acres. 220 ft. 
waterfront Near Ski Hill 
Mountain. $1,600 plus security 
deposit. References required. 
Can 1/312-725-8740. 

51-45-20 

NEW 3 BEDROOM tri-level In 
Round Uke Beach, Rent with 
option to buy at ll.ooo/monih 
(708)74(M137. 

51-46-37 
4 BEDROOM,/ DEN, 2-1/2 
bath, executive home In 
excellent neighborhood 
(708)234-1545 eves. 

51-45-70 
HOUSE FOR RENT, 
Grayslake, 3 bedroom, $650 
■i-security deposit. Garage 
available, (708)223-3562 call 
between 8am to 4pm. 
51-45-116 
3 BEDROOM HOUSE In 
Round Lake Beach, full 
basement, patio, and large 
yard, $675/month (708)541- 
9352. after 6pm. 

51-45-72 

I DUCK LAKE- : 
: INGLESIDE I 

* 4 or5 bedroom, 2 H- car J 
; garage, basement, 1 to 20 J 
J acrcsavoilable. Mwyl34. J 
J $1250 per month J 

* Section 8 or voucher accepted J 
t (708)367-1360 or * 

* (700) 722-4800 (pager): 

DEADLINE-Classlfied 

deadline Is Wednesdays at 
10 a.m. Call (708)223-8161 to 
place your ad tod ay I 



40 Lakeland Nowspaperi 



Friday, Novomber 6, 1992 






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Ilomes 
For Renl 



M 



Homes 
Buildere 



RENTING?? 
WHYNOTBUYI 

eullder will help you get 
financing, McHENRY- 3 
bedroom Ranch, 2 car garage 
- energy efllclenl- like new- . 
Must see -Ready nowl 
$94,900 OR $895/mo. 
rent/option to right party. TWIN 
LAKES- 3 bedroom, 2 hath, 
BMevel, with 2 car garage, 
fireplace, lake rights. Under 
construction $125,900. 
CRYSTAL LAKE- Deluxe 4 
bedroom cedar/brick 2-slory 
with English basement. 2-1/2- 
bath, 3 car garage -fireplace, • 
a lull acre. Many upgrades 
-now under construction. 
S235,00a. AND ISLAND 
LAKE area* Crystal Lake 
schools, 2-s1ory. 2+ bedroom, 
Great room with fireplace, 
Jacuzzi, cedar siding, central 
air, river rights, 1-1/2 car 
garage. STARTING NOWl 
3129,900, OR WILL BUILD 
TO suit: Call for Detafla. 
(708)526-8306. 
LAKE VILLA ON Grand Ave. 
small 2 bedroom homte with 
basement, living room and 
kftchen. l-leat Included. Avallabte 
mW-Nwenrbef. (stoo^mokas, no 
pets. $65a^monlh (706)356-2677 
or(708) 360-6479. 

LARGE 3BEDR00M home in 
Round Lake Parte, Ful basement, 
treshty decorated, $650/month 
(708)546-7667. 

ONE BEDROOM HOUSE In 
Round Lake Beach, deck, 
screened ponii, 1-1/2 carga/age, 
SSOOAnorlh 4securty end uUlies. 
1203 Ideiwlld. (708) 566-^214 

PRIVATE SAND BEACH 

2bed[t>om, 2 car garage, lacuzzj . 
bath, fireplace, all appliances, 
carpeted thru-out including 
basement. Mini bllrKls Ihm-out 
S9S0/month {708)966-0586. 

RENTAL- 3-BEDROOM TRI- 
LEVEL, month to morti or tjaase. 
agent owned. $7&0/morlh. (708) 
546-2666. 

2-BEDROOM IN WILDWOOD, 
close to lollway. Woodland 
schoote, C2)plBTO^nd3. socurty 
doors, pels, air conditioning. 
$683/h>o. pkis utuHUes, avattahle 
Doc.22. (708) 223-4060 leave 
message. 

3BEDR00M CAPE COD In 
Round Lake Park, garage with 
, Iwated work room, eocbsod sun 
pord). avalablo 11/1. S72S/monlh 
^security. (703) 623-5828. 

AVAILABLE JAN.'93 

(POSSIBLE sooner) 3bedroom, 

remodeled Ibath, garage, new 

caipet & appliances, Glenviow. 

{GonMIII area.) $l.075/month 

+5ecurttv. (708)729-5043. 

ROUND LAKE TOWNHOME 

In Countryside Hills, 3 

bedroom, M/2 bath, with 

garage and ail appliances. Pay 

own uliiltles. Available Dec.lst. 

S77S/mo +securlty deposit. 

Call Management Specialists 

(708)587-5250. 



M Home 

L\ THE 

LAK£Li\ND 






L 



WAUSAU 
HOMES 

Quality built homes in 

Southeastern Wisconsin 

and Northeastern Illinois, 

featuring custom dealgna 

udllzinq the latest in . 

energy effident products and 

bulWIng techniques. 

COME SEE OUR 
NEW MODEL 

Open daily 1-6 pm. Just 

North of Grass Lake Rd. 

& RL 83 in Eagle's Nest 

of Call forappoinbnent 

(708) 265-0230 

Buschmaii 
Companies 

DQomwk 



Condoe/ 
Town Homes 




BUFFALO OROVE by owner, 

3 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 2 car 
garage duplex. Must seel 
$139,900 {708)537-4339. 
54-4&-130 

Just Reduced 

)2 bd end unit In Diamorxll 
[Harbor. Boat dock, pool,j 
ifull basement, attached^ 
.garage. Spadoua roomsr 
land a slone firepiacel All, 
'this for $110,900. 
* * * * 

Carefree 
jLakefront Living I 

|ln this 5 mi, 2 bd, 2.5 ba!h{ 
jtownhome. Upgrades] 
itnclude 6 panel doors, i 
lextra wood trim, wetbar,. 
Jwhirtpool, etc., New pierj 
^included In the $35/mo. 
lassessmenL $04,900 

Call 

iMIciiaei Lescher; 

"Your Link to 

the Chain" 

708-395-3000 

Re/Max 
jAdvantagej 



Gondos/ 
Town Homes 



NEWS BEDROOM trt-l«val In 

Round Lake Beach, Rent with 
option to buy $l,000/mo. 
(708)740m37. 

54-45-174 
WHEELING - PLUM CREEK 
Coridos, (Wolf Rd. /So.Dundee 
Rd. north HIntz Rd) Spacious, 
1277sq.fl. 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, 
4th floor, 21 tt balcony, all new 
carpeting, decorating, electric 
range, refdgeralor, kitchen ilie 
floor, Low Monthly payments, 
less than rerrt. Call today Pete 
Dally, Only $84,900 Centu^ 
21- Triebold (708)729-6080. 

54-46-71/Q 
MUNDELEIN, DUPLEX, BY 
Owner. 3bedroom, 2 bath, 
fireplace, cathedral ceilings, 
$115,000. Lisa (708)566-3014. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, dehixe 
3 bedroom toenhome, recently 
decorated, new appliances. 
Available Immedialoty. No pels. 
(708) 803-6977 or (708)740- 
8234. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 
Gbetloomtowrhoine, 13)alh, 1- 
car garage, 5675/month plus 
utilities. Credit check 
requlred.(708) 635-0938 

WHEELING-PLUM CREEK 
GONDOS, (Wol RdTSo. Dundee 
Rd., north Hlrrlz Rd.) Spadous 
1277sq.n. SbedioorTB, 2baths, 4th 
floor, 21 ft. balcony, all new 
carpeting, decorating, electric 
range, i^rigeralor, Udien He ioor, 
k)W morthty payments, toss than 
RENT. Call Pele Daly (706)724- 
4541. Only $84,900. 



Mobile 
[lomcs 




MOBILE HOME 3 todroome. 
1-1/2 bath, super landscape, 
appliances Included. $22,000 
negotiable (414)763-2432. 

55^5-151 
MOBILE HOME, 17FTJt40FT. 
3bedroom3, 1-1/2bath, early 
occupancy. Price reduced for 
qutek salel $15,500 (414)633- 
0053. 



MOBILE HOME, 3YRS. old. 2 
bedroom, cerlral air. dfehwasher, 
wasfier, dryer, skyltghts. celling 
fans, ctosod-ki poitii, shed, skle 
drive. Wauconda, Aduft 
Community, Harmony 

ViUage. (708) 526-3995 

MOBILE HOME- 12FTJ(60FT. 
ready k) bo tomd, good condtion, 
$2,500 (414)537-^997. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 23954 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 
FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on August 3, 1992. 

I, Charles Purcell, Special Commissioner for ihis court will on 
November 25, 1992 at the hour of 10:30 A.M. at the front door ol 
the Lake County Building. 18 North County St.. Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell 10 the highest bidder lor cash, the following 
described premises: 
2966 Twin Oaks Drive, Highland Park. IL 60035 
The improvements on the property consists of single family, 
brick constructed, two story with a separate garago. 

Sate terms: 10% down by certified' funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to spedal assessments. 
The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgment amount was $187,543.46. 
Upon the sale b'eing made the purchaser will receive a 
Certilicate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For information call the Sales Officer at Ptaintifrs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (3t2) 
372-4784 (fom 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law, the Sales OUicer is nol required to provide additional infor- 
mation other than that set forth in ihis notice. 




um\lM 



Rates listed 

in today's paper 

are at least 

three days old. 

For fast, free 

information 

from some of the 

JO&MPBTmVB LENDERS... 



im.hgfim2-RATES 



Mobile 
Homes 





RENTAL- 2 BEDROOM, 1 
bath, mobile home In 
Wauconda. Near town. Has 
washer, dryer, carport. 
$525/mo +$525 security. 
Senior Community. No pets. 
Call (708)526-5000 leave 
message. 

MOBILE HOME 196S 12n 
x50ft, 2 bedrooms, air 
conditioning, refrigerator and 
stove, $6,500 or best offer 
(708)244-1346. after 5pm. 



AparlfpeniB 
For Rem 



LAKE BLUFF* MODERN' 2 

tMdroom af>aninenC In security 
building $500/mo Garage 
avallabte, (708)689-3150. 

56-TF-1fl9^GL' 
L/^KE BLUFF. 1 & 

2l>adroom apartments. 
Laundry racllicles. pool, 
clubhouse. $535 to 
$Sg5/month. Includos Heat, 
(708)615-9717. 

G56-34^F-199rt. 



PERFECT FOR 

WEEKEND 

GETAWAYS! 

PIONEER ESTATES 
LISTINGS! 

• 1990 Skyline ■ 

3 bdrms, 14x70 

$27,900.00 

Immediate Occupancy 

• 1989 Liberty 

14x70, front kitchen, 2 

ig. bdrnns - Reduced 

to $24,900.00 

• 1972 Skyline 

12x60, 2 bdrms, A/C, 
screen porch 
$16,500.00 

These could make 

ideal starter or 

vacation homes. 

Call For Details! 




ESTATES 

2 miles south of 

Hwy. 50 on Hwy. H 

Lake Geneva 

(414) 248-3831 



hglttld* 

t300Dapota 

on 

One & Two Bedroomt 

•SpadouB 

•Privito BalooniM 

•FREE Heat 

-S^crl T«rm UatM avail. 

LAKEVEW APAHTUENTS 

(708)587-0277 



GriyiiaEo 

1 Bedroom apartments 
from Only 

*$512.00 

$300 deposit 

GRAYSIAKE APARTMENTS 

Heat Included 

223-8870 

*nm tMldmt, 1 yr fMS* 



ApurtipenU 
For Rent 




GRAYSLAKE 
APARTMENTS 

Downtown, 3 bedroom, 
2nd floor, 5695. 

•••••••• 
Efficiency, 2nd floor, S3S5 

•••••••• 

3 bedroom, 

Hainesville, 2nd floor 

of house, S645. 

••••*••• 
Section 8 or voucher 
accepted • 

(708) 367-1360 or 
(708) 722-4800 (pager) 



$400.00 CASH FOR 
tHOLroAY SHOPPING* 

Move In November or December 

IWESTWIND VH^LAGE 
APARTMENTS 

ZION, IL 

1 Bdrm Apts 
No Pets 
$495.00 
Call Fran at (708) 872-5404 
or Bear Property Mgmnt 
(414)697-9616 
'Applies to new applicants only 
w/a one year lease 
Can be applied to rent if preferred. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OU R F IL E N Q.»92^ 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 

THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the obove entllled cause on June 26. 1932, 

I, Dennis P. Daly, Special Commissioner lor this court will on 
December 10, 1992 at the hour of 9:30 A.M. at th© Iront door ol 
Courtroom C-101, Lal<a County Courthouse. 18 North County 
SI,, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the 
following described premises: 

314 Woodbine Ave.. Island Lake, IL 60042 

The improvements on the property consists of single family, 
wood frame, one story dwelling, with an attached garage. 

Sale terms: 10% down by certilied funds, balance within 24 
hours, certilied funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT bo open for inspection, 

The judgment amount was $81,240.86. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate ol sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
spocilled date unless the property Is redeemed according to law< 

For Information call the Sales Ollicer at Plainlill's Attorney, 

Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 

372-4784 Irom 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 

law, the Sales Ollicer is nfil required to provide additional Inlor- 

Imatton other than that set forth in this notice. 




Apuritpenu 
For Rent 



VERNON HILLS, DELUXE 2 
bedroom, 1*1/2 bath 
apartment, heat Included, air 
conditioning, No pets. 
$680/mo. (708)438-4529. 

56-4 S-73 
QURNEE, DELUXE 2 
bedroom apartment S560 
month -f-securlty deposit, 
available NOW (708}39S-8465. 

56-45-74 
ONE BEDROOM 

APARTMENT. Excellent 
condition. 1 ACRE park like 
setting. 2020 Rt. 83, 
Mundeleln/Long Grove area. 
$425/mo +securtty (708)647- 
8694 or (708)998-9424. 

56-45-24 



Apurltp«nls 
For Rent 



m 



DEEP LAKE 

HERMITAGE 

ONE BEDROOM 

SPECIAL! 

spacious 1 & 2 bed- 
room apartments. Free 
gas & cooking. Wall to 
watt carpet, appliances 
included. Amplecloset 
space. Tot lot, tennis, 
& basketball court and 
laundry facilities in 
each building. 

From $545 
149 N.Milwaukee Ave 

Lake Villai IL 
(708)356-2002 ^ 
Sorry, no pels M 



ROUND LAKE- 1 b«droom 

apartment fully carpeted, stove 
and refrtgerator. Included. Rent 
Includes all utinies. 2 blocks to 
shop ar>d laundry, 4 blocks to 
train. Private partying, lease 
and security required. 
Available Immediately 
S495/mo. Leave message at 
(708)973-0466. 
LIBERTYVILLE APARTMENT 
1-1/2 bedroom, with garage, 
walk to town/ trains, non- 
smoking building.. $57S/mo. 
(706)362-3637. 

LARGE ONE AND TWO 
bedroom apartments in Lake 
Villa $515/n)o and $630/mo. 
(708)356-5474. 

56-45-46 

LAKESIDE 
LUXURY 

APARTMENTSl 

•Mk;rowave ovans 

•Washers & dryers 

•Vaulted ceilings 

•Patios or balconies 

•Dishwashers 
•Convenient location < 

(708)356-0800 
-705 Watefa Edge Dr.< 
Lake Villa. IL . 

^On Rout* 132 (Qrand Am) Jtm) 

MCt o( Rouu Kl M Ow louth 

•Uf,g(OMpLjlt« 

Tar mimgadiv 



y^stef^a^ 



^^ 



STOP 
LOOKING 



WE HAVE WHAT YOU'RE 

LOOKING FOR 
AT PEBBLESHIRE PHASE 



Spacious Floor Plans 
Laundry In Every BIdg. 
Vertical Mini Blinds 
Ptush Carpeting 



Hospitality Room 

Ceiling Fans 

Modern Appliances 

Minutes From Hawthorne Center 



Two Bedroom Special 

1 Bdrm's From $556.00 

2 Bdrm's From $640.00 
Gas Heat & Cooking INCLUDED 

(708) 367-4504 • 695 Westmoreland Dr. 



2 bd for the Price of 1 

1 .030 sq. ft. 2 bd. 1 1/2 bath homes with: 
• Central Air • Fully Carpeted 

• Balcony/Patio 
•Swimming/Tennis/Saunas 
• On Site Maintenance/Management 
FREE heat & cooking gas 

from 090 

For Lake County's Best Apartmenl Value 

call (708) 662-2273 

.336 N, Green Bay Rd. on Gurnee/Waukegan Border. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 23952 

{rr IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 

THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant lo a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on July 10, 1992. 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 16, 1992 at the hour ol 9:30 A.M. at the front door of 
the Lake County Courthouse, Illinois, sell lo the highest bidder 
for cash, the following described premises: 
272 Oak Bluff Ct.. Wauconda. IL 60Q84 

The improvements on the property consists of condominium, 
aluminum siding, two story with an attached garage. 

Sale terms: 10% down by certified lunds, balance within 24 

hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 

general taxes and to spedal assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $1 04,297.34. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified dale unless the property is redeemed according to taw 

For inlormation call the Sales Olficer at Piaintifrs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 Irom 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law, the Sales Ollicer Is qqI required lo provide additional infor 
mation other than that set forth in this notice. 



Friday. November 6, 1992 



Lakttkind Kewspapen 41 



\-,_ .-_ 



"/,'• J" 



I 



I'' 







Apurltinenit 
For Rcnl 




WAUKEGAN- MODERN t 

Bedroom In quiet well 
managed security building. 
$425. CaU (706)360-0133. 

S6-45-34/G 
WATEHFBONT- 1 Bedroom 
apartmenl, heated, catpeted, 
S540/mo 31 S. PIslakee Lake 
Rd. Fox Lake (70a}3B2-73ie. 

56-45-76 
ROUND LAKE- LARGE, new 
aieckixxti apatmenL SeSQAmnth 
plus utilles. No pets! (708)546- 
6770or(7Q8)54fr4662. 

WAUKEGAN MOOBM STUDO 
In quiet well managed secure 
complex with laundry facility 
$425/month Includes utilities. 
(708)360-0133^ 

NORTH CHICAQO-1BEDROOM 
NEAR /Ubbolt Ub, head Included, 
$435Anon1ti. (706) 816-0625 or 
(708)336-0222. 

NOV.1ST. MOVE-tN SPECIAL. 
$399 1st month rent -f security 
Deposit, Ibedroom.ln quiet 
bulkjlng, stove and refrigerator, 
carpeted, air conditioner, oil 
street parktng, laundry facWIy In 
building. Rent Includes Heat, 
cook gas. Senior DtscountsI For 
Appotntmenl cal days (708)740- 
1141 or ewes 3-9pm (70a)546- 
B350. 



ApurlmcnlB 
For Rent 



1-BEOROOM WATERFRONT 
CONDO, Fox Lake. Pool, tennis 
and t^asketbalt courts, trails tor 
hiking and riding, recFeallon 
building, 24hr. security, 
$450/monlh (815) 344-26^ 

FOX LAKE- VERY largo 2 
beijkoom apartmenl In quiet well 
managed corrplex S59S/month 
Includes Heall (708)973-0544. 

LAKE BLUFF-MODERN 2 

bedroom apartment In security 
building. SSOO/month Garage 
available. (708)6a»3150. 

LARGE 2BEDR00M, 1-1/2 

bath deluxe apaitntent, available 
Immediately. Gurnee 

SChoob.(708) 546-6654. 

ORCHARD APAHTMENTS-3- 
1/2 MILES west of CLC on 
Washington St. 2bedroom, 
tialcony, carpeted, appliances, 
heat water and gas included. 
Laun(*y tadllles, near shopping, 
No pets. No Waterbedsl 
$S30/mo.(708) 328-6674 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. Quiet, 
clean, Ibedroom apartment, 
90und floor, laundry room, small 
pet possible, non-smoker 
preferred. $460/month (heal 
Included) (708)546-2903. 



^Vater's Edge 
Apartmetits 

* Scenic Country Setting 

* Stocked Fishini; Pond 

. » Private Patios or Balconies 

► Dishwashers, FREE gas, heat U cooklnf* 

► One U two bedroom w/ spacious Floor plans 

► Minutes £rom train, 1-94 tt shopping 

(708) S87-6S88 



ill 



^. 






^ 
¥ 



t=J, 



Optn 

Mtn.IhruStL 

B-5 



WHISPERING OAKS 
w APARTMENTS 

^ MANAGER'S SPECIAL 
^ You First Month's Rent 
^* FREE w/12 mo. Laase 
Now Available 
1.2,3BDRMAPTS. 
Starting at $400 per mo. 
Our apartments Inciuds: 
• Free Heat 
> Free Cooking Gas 
. Free Hot Wafer 
- Free Parking 

2443 Dugdalo, Waukegan 
(708}33&4400 . 



•* 



V 
V 



AptB. /Homes 
To Share 



./ 



m 



Bub. Propori 
For Kent 



^D 



CHRISTIAN LADY DESIRES 
roomm^e to stare private room 
wA»alh, twusetwtd priveledges 
induded,C70e) 74O-0ai3 Round 
Ijake Park area. 



ICoonriB 
For Rent 




OFFICE SPACE- GRAND Ave., 
Lake Villa. Good vislbttity, 
convenient parking, utilllles 
included. 400sq.lt. 5500/monlti. 
(7Q8)356-2677 0((706) 360-8479. 

BOUND LAKE OFHCBSTORE. 

New building. I.OOOsq.tt. 
(708)546-6770 or (706)546-4862 



LAKESIDE, AIR CondltlonW 

room on Fox Lake with private 
bath and private enU'anoe. 
Rooms boglraiino at $75/week. 
(706)356-2747. 
GURNEE- ROOM FOR Young 
empkjyed Genleimen. Call (708) 
662-2802 leave message If 
necessaiy. 

ROOMS FOR RENT, stove and 
refrigerator, utilities Included. 
575-$85^reek. (708)233-5444 
or (708)249-5444 

liuB. Properl 
For Sale 



fS 



FOR RENT 



^^ 



FAST FOOD RESTAURANT & 

Yogurt/Ice Cream combo, 
(possible Pizza BoomI) All 
■^ equipment included, oxoellenl 
downtown Grayslake kicatbn, 
temranegolible. (815)675-6388 
or (708) 223-4762. 



UuB. I'ropert 
For Rent 



o|^^ 



1.200 sq.ft. 

professional office 

in downtown 

Fox Lake. 

(Grand Ave.) 

Private entrance, 

air condition, 

newer building. 

Perfect for law 

office, accountant, 

small business, 

etc. Off street 

■parking. Excellent 

condition. 

Immediate , 

Occupancy 

Reasonable Rent 



C708) 587-4Z44 



I 



INDUSTRIAL 
SPACE 



FOUNTAIN HEAD 

CORPORATE CENTER 

'on RT.12 IN RICHMOND 

Superior 2,400, 4,800 

square foot unit 

'For Industry or Business 

Overfiead door/dock 

A/C Office ■ 

LAND MANAGEMENT 

(815) 678-4771 




Vacant Lots/| 
Acreage 

TIME SHARE: 1 WEEK /Year, 
select from several resorts 
annually 52,900/bost offer 
Must Selii (815)338-2393. 

UcBoriyVuc. 
lt<inlulH 



9 



BONrrA BEACH, NAPLES H.0RIDA 

Gulf View, 2 Br. Luxury 

Condo. Pool, Tennis on 

premises. Easy Beach 

Access. 1 Month Minimum. 

Available fJovember, 

December, January, February 

or April. (516)261-4768 



Oul or Area 
P rop<irly 




ARK.-HOTSPRIHGS- 

Relocallon Dreaml TIRED of 

the BIG CITY? 8000 sf. 

Colonial home, 6BR, 

6 1/2 blh on 33 ao w/pond. 

For intortnatlon call: 

Century 21 -Caldwell Realty. 

1-800-321-7891 



Wl. WATER FOR NOW 
AND THE FURTURE. 

1 mil gal. pure water (lows dallyt 

215 boaijtilulac. farm 

borders Stale loresl. 

Unique blds./Lanl 85 mi. 

NW downtown Ctilcago. Rec., 

bus. or lnvo3t. $5B5K, 

CaUWIIlBtBt5-€75-1100 



Wl^cbNsiN: 

NORTH CENTRAL 

Secluded tiome on 250 

acres, 6400 sq. ft. 7 Bdrm, 

4 btli, massive frpis, 2nd 

Home & Bam $325,000, 

CaU Mike or Ellen, 

DAIRYLAND HEAUTY Medtonl 

715-748-5700 



WISCONSIN 

MANITOWOC COUNTY... 

* tJWE MICHIGAN LOT. 
150'(ran(age. S35.000Z-135fl 

* ESTATE ON INLAND 

LAKE, 19 acres, archttec- 

turaiy designed home, 

approx 3500 sq. ft. Z-134S 

* FIVE ACRE Mlt^JI-FARM 
W/S600 sq. fi. residence. 
Includes separate 2 bdnn 
apartment plus attlclency 

apartment & barn. LS-t323 

* TWO BDRM RETREAT 
with 90' frontage on Lake 

Michigan, adjacerit to slata 

torest. Priceless sunrises, 

miles ol sand beach. Z-13t9 

TlrF0URBDRM,4balh 

stately, year-round home on 

1.14 acres witti view of Lake 

Michigan. Private game 

room with wet bar, many 

otheramenllles. Z-1302 

Likeshoro Ltd., Realtors 

(414)683-7200 






The Great American 
Dream Series 



Ji-i 











LJLjU 



J-' 



^tk£^ 



WiUiain snort 



$92,500 

(on your lot 
garage inehided) 



T7- 







Compart th*M standard laaturcs: _ 

• 1 7 of R3a ceiling insutaJion 

• 2x6 exterior wall? R-20 slandard 

• Ceilings and interior walls are gypsum board ' Q^s farced air heal 
•HorizontaJhardboaid exterior siding, • Peachlree insulated melal clad entrance door 

standard • Thermal wood windows with screens 

• Cedar or Malnlenance-Free Vinyl optional * A coniptete h ome, paint, stained and carpeted. 



Welcome 



X^AjUOnW;^^ TO OVER 90.0 

FAMILIES 



Prlcfl'doeG not Include permllB, survey arid 
engineering lot clearing, eewar arid water or 
sepllc and well, cutvens, drlvowayt, walks, 
iondicaplng orrirurKlng {Thee* andgtlwrtHa 
Improvamflits available. Lowar lavala on Bi- 
Lavali and Trt4avalt not llnithad). 



COUNTY isinw: 

BUIZaDERS 

21 6 Janet Drive 

Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



TRIPLE "A 



II 



34390 N. Rte. 45 

Lake Villa 

708-223-7900 



BUY IT 
SELL IT 

FIND IT 

Lakefand Classified 

(708)223-8161 



Look For Your Dream 

Home Here In 
Lakeland ClassiEieds 



What*s New 
On the Market 



OPEN HOUSE 



Saturday 1 to 4 pm 

25715 N.FaiilioldRd., 

Hawthorn Woods 

5 acres dt peac«tul counlry IMrTg • 

room (Of your horsos of dogs. 4 

Bd..21/2t3am,2400!q.ncfldar 

rBr>ch w/Baee ned room & partalty 

Inlthed basement »29,900 

C-21 ADVANTAGE 
(708)438-2100 

Rick Waailewski 



OPEN HOUSE 

Nov. 7 & 8; 12-3 p.m. 
201 S. Beck Rd., 

LIndenhurst 
Newer quad level or^ large 

wooded lot. 

(Diwcfont: Grtnd & Stnd Laka 

Rd, East to Batk. Notti h number) 

Sue Gust 

C-21 Michael Warren 
(708) 395-5900 



DONT MISS OUT! 

To find out how you can 

include your listings in 

this weekly feature and 

run in alt 14 of our Lake 

County newspapers, call 

your 

CLASSIFIED 

AD-VISOR TODAY 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(708)223-8161 



commardal 

3,600 sq. ft. Quality 

Office Space. Exceptional 
hultdout. 500 sq.ft. of 
warehouse. Separate 

computer room. Excellent 

Lake Bluff location. 

Call Harry or Ma/y at 

McKee Real Estate 
(708) 634-6500 

(Locaiion; 2Sa3S HttVy Dr. K11 a 212) 



OPEN HOUSE 

Sat. -Sun. 1-5 p.m. 
3063-3067 BURRIS 
WAUKEGAN MODELS 

(Como to oKico at 2905 Sunsoi, 
Groon Bay and Sunsot, oast to 2906) 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

Raised-Ranch, B rooms, 4 bedrooms, 

2 balh and 2 car garage. Tri-Lovel, 7 

rooms, 3 bedrooms, flrep!a(», 1 1S 

t)alhs and 2 car garage, Lois have 

mature trees and In quiel 

nolghbortiood. $129,900 each. 
C.C.C. REALTY 623-9090 



ROMANCE ON A I 

BUDGET!! 

Cfieaperthan Rentll 
2 Bdrm, condo's $57,900 - 

'1 Bdrm. 341 ,900. Rent/Opllon; 
AvaiL Fireplace, C/A, pool, 
tennia, morel Minutes lo - 
AbbonPark) Call 

Brenda Lawier 872-1515 

CORNERSTONE REALTT \ 
872-8998 



CLEAN, MOVE-IN 
CONDITION! 

An oversized lot & 
bi0 playyard for the 

kids locatedon 

corner lot of dead 

end street of quiet 

Round Lake Heights 

offers this 2/3 bdrm 

on below appraised 

value. Kitchen 

appliances stay. 

Near schools. 

Call for appointment 

(708)546-0569/ 

owner. 

$69,000. 



Ingleside 

by Owner-Ranch 

6 room/2bd. New 

Kitchen & bath. All 

new carpet in quiet 

neighborhood. 

Close to town & 

train. Possible 

creative financing. 

Low $60's 

OPEN HOUSE 

Sun 1-4 pm 

35711 Hunt Ave. 

2 blocks NW or 

Wilson/Rollins Rds. 

(815) 675-6776 



TIPS ON- 

HOW TO WRITE A 
CLASSIFIED 



AD 

THAT 

SELLS 






1. Use a KEYWORD. This 
immodiately tells the reader 
exactly what ii Is you have to 
sell.. 

2. Make your description 
CLEAR and PRACTICAL. 
State (he year, make, model, 
color, size, and tell what 
condition the item Is, Also 
state the special features. 

3. Slate the PRICE. . 
Successful Class IHed 
advertisers have learned 
that the price in an ad helps 
increase the chances for 
results. ' 



4. if there's a genuine 
sense of URGENCY, say 
so. The words, "We're 
Moving" or "Must Sell Fast" 
suggests that readers 
respond immediately. 

5. include your PHONE 
NUMBER. Classifieds get 
results fast and often 
generate immediate sales. 
If you cannot be available 
to answer the phone at all 
times, be sure to specify 
special calling times such 
as "after 6 PM" or 'Betore 
11 AM-. 



If you need assistance ask one of our friendly 
AD-VISORS to help you word your ad. 

Call (708)223-8161 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 




RECREATIONAL 




Kccrcational, 
VcIiIcIgb 



STORAGE SPACE- 

SuMibi* tor boat, camper, , 
car, or motorhome. Steel 
building m my Union Grove 
hOdM. (414)678-3304. 
70-40-110 

1977 DODGE 23FT. Moloriwmo, 
good condition, root air 
conditioning, new tires, $5,500. 
(414)862-2650. 

1983 ITASCA MOTOR homo, 
complele bedroom, full bath, TV, 
air condiltontng, furnace, 
getiecalor, sleeps 6. 33.000 mies. 
$1B,000 (414)662-6600 

DEER HUNTERS CABIN on 
wheels! 1975 19f1. Winnebago, 
Kres excetloni, low mileage, 
mechanically ready $3,000 

(700)395-5340. 

MOTORHOME- 1976 31 FT. 
Concord, Class A, sleeps 8, roof 
sk goneralor, rricmwave, sopaiale 
shower, awning. $7,500 oroltor 
(708)395-1071. 

TRAVEL TRAILER. 1977 2811. 
dual axle Hertlago (708) 
949-5016 



Hccroutional 
Vehicles 




1962 Ht-LO CAMPER, tlespa 
S, $1,000 (708)223-5409. 
70-45-152 

FOR RENT- WINNEBAGO 28 
or Pace Arrow 31 , salln sheets, 
towels, dishes; and more, 
sleeps 6. No mileage or hidden 
costs. SlOO/day with a Chevy 
454. Call (708)526-7966. 
70^7-45 

WANT TO BUY or TRADE 

mini home or Motor home 
Reasonable: (815)227-5704 
Call anytime or leave 
message. 



70-46-77 



SnowmoTuTc 
ATVb 



M 



ATTENTION: 

SNOWMOBILERS- Northern 
lliltiois Yamaha. New 
experienced snowmobile 
division, We let our prices do 
our taikingi New part and 
accessories department. 
Trailers. Easy financing 
(708)362-7114. 

71-45-81 




V- '.'.■■ Vt I'., 
• ••••••-■•J 






N£EI> 
A 

NEW 
COAT? 

CHECK THE 
CLASSIFIEDS! 
From painters 
to antique fiirs'- 
...we cover the 
market place. 
When jrou're 
looWng lo buy, 
sell or rent just 
about anything 
at all, look to .. 
the Qasafieds!.' 

;':' Lakeland :;i; 
." Newapopcr'a "^-i 
:; ClAulficdB '* 




LfiGALNOnCE 
PUBLICATION IS EASY 
AND CONVENIENT IN 
LAKELAND 
NEWSPAPERS 
An invitation is extended to 
public bodies, attorneys, 
businesses and private citi- 
zens to use the publica 
tlons of Lakeland 
Newspapers for conve 
nient, efficient and eco 
nomlcal publication 
required for Legal Notice 
by the State of Illinois 
statutes. 
Legal notices may be 
placed In person at our 
centrally located business 
office, 30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake, 60030. or sent 
by mail or FAX. 708-223 
8810. The lelephone num 
ber is 708-223-81 61. 
The 14 community news 
paper publications of 
Lakeland Newspapers 
meet all the statutory 
requlremenis for Legal 
Notice In Lake County, '" 
Our rates are economical 
and our deadline is the lat- 
est In Lake County. We 
regularly provide publica- 
tion service under ine tight- 
est time restrictions. 
The Lakeland staff is expe- 
rienced In the uriique 
requirements for Public 
Notice. We are ready to 
assist with your questions 
and all your Public Notice 
needs. For questions and 
rate information, please 
call Chris Kenyon at 708 
223-8161. Let us serve you 
with Legal Notice publica 
Hon. Thank you. 

The Publisher 
Lakeland Newspapers 



snowmobile 

ATVb 



^^K 



SNOWMOBILE, 1979 PoUrIa 
TX440, 1.100 miles. Excellent 
condition, hand warmers, 
shop, dolly, garage kept. 
$1,000 (708)438-0153. 

7l^ R.fln 
NEVER USED COMPLETE 
snowmobile outfit, ladles, size 
small, In black with red trim, 
$300 or best offer (70S)e4B' 
5349. 

71-45-132 
1990 POLARIS 500, Low 
mites, hand and thumb 
warmers, must Seel $3,450 
OR Best (708)497^584. 

68-45-109 . 

SNOWMOBILE 1969 Skl-Doo 
Mach 1, low miles, excelletit 
condition $3,000 or best offer 
(815)675-2838. - . ^ 

71-45-83 
1985 V-MAX SNOWMOBILE, 
good condition, low miles, 
$2,200 or beat offer. Call after 
7pm (414)862-6959. 

71-45-175 
1968 KX125, OVER $400 In . 
new parts, new top end, clutch, 
fenders.'chaln, and sprockets, 
mary extras, AsWng $1 ,000 (706) 
356-6523 after 6pm. 

3-WHEELER 19BG YAMAHA 
Trt-Zingor, good condllkjn, niiw 
great, $300. (708) 356-9156 



z:<j 



42 Lakokind Nowspap«ri 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



V4M^;^^iui^ft^.i,4k2ii^X^<^'*'*^ < 









lo 

m, 

m- 

nd 

'8- 

so- 
on 

3fs 

be 
}ur 
>ss 
31., 
ant 
23. 

im- 

Na- 
of 
ars 
ory 
gal 
III. 
Jeal 
lat- 
We 
ica- 
ght- 

ipe- 
que 
bile 
f to 
ons 
ijlce 
and 
ase 
'08- 
you 
Ilea- 

sher 
pers 



Claris 

:atlent 

mors, 

kept. 



3, size 
d trim, 



, Low 
Ihumb 
!3,4S0 



I 





^^A 



Uoals/Motor 

Etc. 

TPI-AXLE GALVANIZED boat 
trailer fits 32' boat, fully. 
adjustable $2,800 [709)395- 
3978. 

72-45-133 

12ft. ALUMINUM BOAT.nmv 

trailer, B-1/2hp, asking $1,600 
(708)52fr340e. 

72-45:176 
RtCHLINE ISn. ALUMINUM 
boat with Mercury motor and 
accessories, $1,650. ALSO 
Aluminum 1636 Shorestatlon 
wtlh cradle $750 Call (708)587- 
7280, 

72-45-25 
flV or BOAT STORAGE 
available. Wauconda area. 
(815)385-4419 evenings. 




Travel/ 
Vacation 



AIRLINE TICKETS 

MILWAUKEEA)ENVER 1-way, 
1-maIe, 1-lemale, November 
21,92. $100/eacti or best offer 
(708) 872-8258 




Sporle 
Kciuinnrnint 



SOLOFLEX EXERCISE 

MACHM4E, wftti leg and butleif ly 
extension, 3yrs. old. S7S0/or 
best offer. (414) 694-6020. 

QOLF CLUBS- 1.3.5 
Woods, 3-p Irons, almost 
Newl $200 or best offer 
(708)973-0149. 

7,'>-34n*F-35/G 



TRANSPORTATION 



Care . 
.For Sale 




Cars 
For Sale 




1984 DODOE OMNI. 63.000 
miles on body, recant engine 
overhaul and transmission 
replacement, burgundy color, 
mlrn Interior, too many Items to 
mention, $1,400 (708)367- 
2599. 

JO-45-86 

1988 OLDS Calais; qmo 

package, am/lm cassette, 
$5,000 eves or weekends 
(815)363-8657. 

80-45-178 
PORSCHE 1982 Gold Modsl 
926 sunroof, phone, leather 
Interior, all Imaglnabts options, 
low mileage, Immaculate 
condtlton, S5.0OO under book 
price (or quick salel $13,000 
(708)356-5245. 

80-45-88 
CHRYSLER, 1984 FIFTH Avt. 
all extras, 4-door, 29,000 
miles, SharpI $4,500 
(708)882-6602. 

80^5-93 
HOIST- AUTO AND Light 
tmck, electrte hydraulic, 42lncti 
lilt S900. (708)395-9444. 

80^5-134 
1984 BUICK PARK AVE. 
kiaded, looks and runs greet, 
must sell $2,995 1991 CHEVY 
Impala, very dependable, new 
exhaust $699 (815)477-3432. 

80-45-90 
1969 CONVERTIBLE 
CORVETTE, numbers match, 
4-8peed, factory hardtop, till 
steering, power brakes, power 
steering $13,000 (708)433- 
7934. 

80-45-96 
BUIck, 1872. SKYLARK 
convertible, red, white top, 350 
engine, excellent condition, 
FIret $4,000 (708)456-5839. 

80-45-91 
19881/2 FORD ESCORT GT. 
excellent condlOon $4,000 Call 
after 7pm or on weekends 
(708)362-3162. 

80-4&-156 

1979 CHRYSLER LaBiron 

Town and Country wagon, 
power steering, power brakes, 
air, $500 or best offer 
(708)587-4001 after 6pm. 

80-45-JL5Q 
1987 BUICK ELECTRA T- 
typo 4-door, Sedan, excellent 
condition, like new leather 
Interior, full power. $5,700 
. Liberty vllle area. (708)367- 
0134. 

80-44-100 



CADILLAC, 1990 

•"•-cETWOOD mint condition, 
22k mites, loaded, leather 
Interwr, $18,900 or best offer 
(708)438-8789. 

a(M5-179 
1978 TRANS AM, BLACK,400 
engine. T-tops, power steering/ 
brakes / windows, locks, 
$2,500 (815)455-6428 

80-45-146 
BUICK- 1972 RIVIERA, Call 
(414)694-2574 after 4pm. 

80-53-95 
OLDS, 1084 CUTLASS 
Supreme, V-a, air, till, delay, 
cruise, voi^' good condition 
$3,300 or best (708)680-7296. 

80:45-104 
RED AND READYl 50+MPG 
1991 Chevy Geo 5-speed, 
30,000 miles. Must Sell. 
$4,993.(708)546-7621. 

80-«5O8 
TOYOtA- 1983 TOYOTA 
Cellca, 4-8peed, with O.D. 
30,000 miles on engine, 
$3,000(708)265-1127. 

80-45-137 

1987 YUQO, sek mliss, runs 
great, looks great. $1,000 or 
best offer. (708)395:5258 after 
5pm. 

' 80-45-35 
1984 CAMARO, Automitic, 
V-6, am/fm cassette, low 
miles, Excellent condition 
(708)949-0097. 

_ 80-45^15 

1988 PLYMOtitH Grand 
Voyager, power steering, 
power brakes, V-6 tinted glass, 
deluxe interior, $6,699 
(708)587-1321. 

80-45-158 

1986 OLDS . CUTLASS 
Brougham, very good 
condition. $3,800 (708)362- 
7917 after 5pm. 

60-4.5:92 
1979 NOVA CUSTOM Sport 
Coupe, recent transmission 
and brakes, nins great, original 
owner, $1,000 or best offer 
(708)566-6986. 

80:45:99 
1985 FORD $3,000 or best 
offer Needs little mechanical 
work. (708)249-1217. 

60-45-98 . . 

1987 RED SUNBIRD- A-1 
condition, like now, 35,000 
miles, 1-owner, new tires, 

. Asking $4,500 Please call 
(708)566-8801 after 6pm. 
80-45-97 



Cure 
For Sale 

1S84 CHRYSLERTaBaro^, 

convertible, $2,600 or best 
offer. After 5pm (708)973- 
1520. 

80-45-143 
1985 JAGUAR FJ6, exira 
clean, sunroof, leather, new 
tires, Must Seel $8,200 
(708)949-1417. 

80-45-101 
1S88 DODGE ARIES. Vlmllon 
wagon, $2,500 or best offer 
(708)546-8613 

60-45-14B 

1989 HYUNDAI EXCEL QL, 
air, automatic, wel maintained 
$3,200 (708)680-5437. 

80-45-102 

1990 FORD TEMPO, 
Automatic, air, sunroof, I9,ooo 
miles, all power, electric group. 
$5,900 (708)872-6052. 

80^5-121/Q 
1963 UOHTE CARLO IomM, 
beautiful intarfor. runs great, 
some rust, $950. (708)546- 
6152. 

8045-147 - 

1989 SILVER MAZDA 626, 4- 
door, automat k; with low mites, 
excellent condltkin, $7,500 or 
best.(708) 223-2484 

1990 DODGE DAYTONA ES, 

excellent condition, automalfe, 
am/lm cassetle, all power, low 
miles, £tn has extended wanahly. 
Must Belli $8,000/ best 
(708)395^276. 

1991 CAMARO RS, While, 
automatic, outse, power stoeifrig, 
power brakes, power windows, 
rear window touver, 726 Spoiler 
35 JOOO mies, amim stereo wlape 
deck, $9,200 (708)356-1334. 

1991 FAIRMONT 14X70, 

3bedrtx>m, mobile home in quiet 
parte $23,300 vMi amenlies.(7oe) 
546-2845 




Cars 
For Sale. 



1975 CAMARO, $2,000 (414) ' 
694-1042. 

1978 ZEPHER, 2-OOOR, 4- 

cylinder, automatic, many new 
parts, fresh pahl, Shaipl $1 300. 
(708) 249-1350. 

1961 CADILLAC SEVILLE, 4.6B 
engine, 6.0 digital fuel Injectkin, 
front wheel (frive, thermostat 
comlrolted air/heal, dSgHaJ fuel 
range, fuR poAer. A Must See! 
Showroom dean, amf m cassette, 
Tosblla pull-out. 75k miles, 
asking $3,095 or best. Call 
anyttne alter2^ (708)223-6647 

1961 CHEVY CAPRICE Wagon, 
lots ol miles, good car $500 or 
best,{708) 546-8750 

1984 OLDS CUTLASS 

Brougham, 60,000 miles, 6- 
cylnder, new tkes, 4-door, orighal 
woman owner, $3,000 (706) 
223-0549 

1985 BUICK SKYHAWK, 5- 
speed, air, rado/cassette, engine 
needs work, $600. (708) 
566-6266 after 5pm. 

1986 CELEBRITY, CRUISE, 
stereo, dean, exceUent corxltkxi, 
1-owner. $2.000 (708) 356-1017. 

1986 PONTIAC FIERO, gold, 
automatic, power windows, 
sunroof, ainTm cassette, 66,000 
mites, reoart txakes and luneup, 
good oondltton. nirts excellent, 
$2.800 (708) 662-5780 

1988 MUSTANG GT, full 
package, good condRkin, $6,200 
(414)245-6567. 

1989 FORD CLUB Wagon 351 
engine, loaded, towing package. 
Must Sell! (414)763-8978. 




Service & 
Paris 



1 . /S rORD T-BIRD. Parts for 

satol Motors, trans, rear end, 
all in good condition. Gall 
bcforo Opm at (414)857-2525 
ond ask for Mark, aftor 6pm 
call (414)857-9025. 

83-TF-OO 

CAR CARRIER. VsTus' of 
$1,200 sell for $500 (708)546- 
2981. 

83*45-122 
(2j FORD &CYCiNDB) engines. 
Make an offer.(708) 35&-5430. ' 

(3) 1057 CHEVYS, restoTsMe; 
misc. pails lor 1 956-57 Chevy. 
(414)859-2457 

CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 

sale. Mustang, Camaro, Nova, 
Chevelle, Cutlass, Mopars, 
Por<lac, Chevrolet, morel Trunk 
pans, fh>or pans, doors, tenders, 
bumpers. New and California 
rust free. MARK'S PLATING 
AND SUPPLY. 217-824-6184. 

MEYERS SNOWPLOW PUMP, 
good shape, $250 Call (708) 
740-2074. 

NOVA DOORS, 2-DOOR 

haidlop, fins 1962-1965. 19677- 
1967 Nova hood, tits 1966-67 
Chevele, back fenders f Is 1970- 
72. (414) 537-^924 



Vans' 



M 



1991 NISSAN SENTRA SE-R, 
5-speed, air, rod, $7,800 
(708)546-1343. 

DESPERATELY MUST SELL 
by SUNDAY. Deal of a Ufellme. 
Intinity, 1991 G-20 Burgundy, 
23k n^les, sunroof, 75,000 mHes 
warranty. Must Seel 
(708)398-7333. 



OLDSMOBILES- ALL BRAND 
new 1993 sold at $49 below 
lactoiy Invoice. Call lor price 
quote l-eoo-724-6970. No sales 
people. Recorded message. 
Castle Oldsmoble, Morton Grove, 
IL ^_^ 

1982 BMW 321 1, 2-door. red, 5- 
speed, aJr, sunroof, $4^000 or 
best offer.(708) 623-7718 



1982 MAZDA GLC 

HATCHBACK. 58.000 miles, 
exoeient condbn In and ouL New 
brakes, belts, tune-up. 5-speed, 
tl, outeo, air, rear defrost, hto nisi. 
Runs greall(708) 945-5217 

1962 SAAB 900S. I does not rua 
Book valuo $3,000 asking. $1,000 
or best olfor(708) 223-0324 



1983 TRANS AM, Great shape, 
T-tops, awesome sloreo, 64K, 
$5,200 or best otfer.(8l5) 
385-0245 ask for Sam. 

1984 FIREBIRD, LIMITED 

Edition, V-6, automatk;, power 
steering, powor brakes, air, 
sunrool. Very nice Car! Special 
$2 950. 
(708)872-0892 



Closstc/AnUquc 
Cars 




1966 CADILLAC SEDAN 
DeVillo, 4-door, 53,000 miles, 
$1,200 or best (2) 15x10' 
Mags lor 5-5-1/2 bolt pattern 
$50. (708)223-4072. 
82-45-136 
1959 CHEVY PICICUP 
Fleetside, Original motor. 90% 
restored. $3,500 (708)740- 
1577. 

82-31 /TF-1 53 
1958 CADILLAC Sedan 
DeVille, 43,000 "A" miles, 
Arizona car, excellent 
condition, Fresh tune-up 
$5,000 FIRM. (708)223-7393. 
82-00-00 

AUG 1970 AMBASSADOR, 
2-door, hardtop, V-8, 360 
engine, automatic, pbwer 
steering, power brakes, air, 
new vinyl top, ail original, 1- 
owner, a Must Seel (414)694- 
5979 Best offer. 

a2-37/rF-61/G 
1929 1 -TON MODEL AA engine 
runs, have 95% ol pails. Good 
winter prolect $1 ,200 (708)587- 
1598. 

1964 FORD FALCON Futura. 
2-door with 351 Windsor, 
Caltfomia carl! (708) 949-6016. 

CLASSIC VW BUG, all In very 
good oondltkHi, 1968, 1971, and 
1972. Must Seel Make offer on 
each or $3,700 for all! 
(815)344-0626 leave message. 

COLLECTORS CARS, (2) 1970 
Okls, 2-door hardtop, 1/51,500; 
1 flree for parts. (708) 872-3403. 



CHEVY CONVERSION Van, 
1984 fully equipped, 4- 
captains chs^rs, 305 Scyiinder, 
excellent condition, blue-gold 
trim, mostly vacation miles, 
$5,500 (708)367-1684. 

85-45-107 
1987 ASTRO VAN. RUNS and 
looks very good, Call 
(414}88g44ai. 

8&4 5-183 

1983 DODGE CARGO Van, 
1 ton, runs great, best offer. 
Must sell. Gall days (708)390- 
8050 ext.667 or eves 
(708)546-5809. 

85-40/TF-147 

1983 3/4-TON CHEVY Van, 
140,000 miles, stm mns great, 
$2,000 or best offer After 5pm 
(B15) 675-6822. 

1984 FORD 3/4-TON Window 
Van, 12fH93engBf, air, stereo and 
cmlse. $3.100 (414) 652-6896. 

1985 CHEVY STEP-VAN G-30. 
75,000 mies, gerwrator. air/heal, 
automatic. 454 $13,500 (SIS) 
675-2421 eves, (708)740-9000 
days. 

1986 CHEVY CARGO Van, 3/4 
ton good condition, $3,500 or 
best (708) 395-7052. 

1987 CHEVY CONVERSION 

Van 350, automatk;, cruise, a/c, 
rear auxfery heal. anVTm cassoOa, 
Reese hitch, mnnlng boards, 
clean-No Rust $8,500 or t>esl 
offer (414) 889-8328. 

1988 FORD ACR05TAR Mini- 
van, 42k mHes. am/Im cassette, 
original owner, extended service 
warranty available, $6,200 (706) 
336-0457. 

1988 NISSAN VAN XE, only 
36,000 miles, great condition, 
Tenltlc family vehtete that can t» 
used lor business, $6,905 or 
best otfer. (708) 336-8668 

1990 PLYMOUTH GRAND 
Voyager LE, great condition, 
under 30,000 miles, loaded, 
Texas car, hk) Rust! 70,000 mile 
warranty. $14,250 alter 5pm 
(708)223-2675. 



Vans 





MUST SELLII 1990 Sliver 
Chevy 4x4 pickup. Silverado 
package, 350 engine, 5- 
spoed, running boards, bed 
liner, sliding rear window, 
43,000 miles, $1l',500 or best 
offer (414)889-8340 

85JF-1??^t= 

CHEVY 1982 CONVERSION 
Van rebuilt englrw, mns good, 
good tires, brakes, etc. $2,000 
or best offer (708)336-5608. 
85-47-10 6 

Trucks/ 
Trailcre 

MUST SELLI 1990 SILVER 
Chevy pickup 4x4, Silverado 
package, 350 engine, 5-speed, 
running boards, bedliner, 
sliding rear window, 43,000 
miles $11,500 best offer 
(414)889-8340. 

86-45-138 
1990 FORD RANGER XLT, 
extended cab, loaded, new 
tires and cap, asking $7,600 
(414)537-2955 after 3pm. 

tsJ m^^ 

1982 CHEVROLET 

SUBURB/\N Silverado, clean, 
loaded, $3,900; Towing 
package, (7D8)356-9063 days 
or (708)356-9054 evenings. 

66-45- IP.-^ 
MUST SELLI 1976 Chtvy 3/4 
ton pick-up, $1,100 I9tt. Cabin 
CRUISER Tri-hull boat, with 
trailer S2,500 (708)244-9715. 

■ ... 86-45-108 
UTILfTY TRAILER. 4x6 tt., 
.1,000ib. Springs, has tilt bed, 
$375.00. CaJI(41 4)657-1 238 

. after 3pm 

BR-TF-i'ifvr; 

1985 CHEVY 3/4 TON pickup, 
350 motor, 400 transmission, 
new brakes, Reese hitch, 
$3,750 or best (708)546-4549 
days or (708)546-9582 eves. 

86-45-153 

1986 QMC DIESEL 3500 
Series pickup, 4-speed, extra 
clean. Sold with or without 
slkle-(n camper. $5,500 or best 
offer (41 4)862-941 7. 

8&4 5-157 
1977 FORD F-1S0 4X4, 351 M,4- 
speed, total rebuilt with redepts, 
never used tor ptowing, looks 
and runs ^eal, black. 4x4 perfect. 
$2,900 or best otier (708) 
587-3026 leave message. 

1963 FORD FtANGER, 4-cy1Mer. 
4-speed with cap, new Ures with 
spares, body In good shape, as 
Is. $1 .200 (708)356-5889 alter 
Spm. 

1988 CHEVY S-10 Pickup. 6- 
cylinder, 4.3L, automatic, tilt, 
stereo, 74,000 mites, $6,000 or 
best offer. (414)843-3615. 

1989 FORD RANGER XLT. 
extended cap, 40,000 miles, 
automatic, air. Moving Over 
Seas- Must Seill (706) 537-3247 

, after 6pm 

1 990 SUBURBAN SILVERADO, 
blue on dark blue, dean, non- 
smoker, loaded, 76,000 miles, 
$12.500(414)677-3507. 

1991 JEEP COMANCHE Picki^), 
Sporty, air, am/fm tape, loke 
new, only 20,000 mties, 7/70 
warranty, 4-speed. 4-cyllnder, 
Great mileage. $7,200 or best. 
(414)652-3875 or (414)657-71 14. 

MUST SELLI 1980 Dodge 
Ramcharger 4x4. runs good, 
new tires, new leaf springs, 
$2.000/orbesl, (708)473-5560 
leave message. 




Trticks/ 

Trallcra 

1986 DODGE PICKUP $4,900 
or best, 1985 DODGE Ram 
Charger, 4x4 $4,600 or best 
Skefns of yarn, SEARS 
refrigerator, $165. Call after 
6pm (815)675-6434. 
66-4&-164 
1988 FORD PTCKUP 160 XLT, 
Lariat, gray with topper, 27,000 
miles, excellent condition 
$9,000(414)669-4715. 

. 86-45-185 
PARTINQ OUT JEEP 
PARTSII Misc. parts for CJ-S 
and CJ-7'a Including grills, 
wfteeis, rims, hard top, etc. Call 
(708)740-0562. 

86-34/TF-118/G 
1986 FORD F150, V-8, $3,600 
or best offer (706)740-4369 or 
(708)587-8917. 

86-4&-186. 
1981 F-150 4x4, nsw 
•nglns, 44 Inch all terrains 
tires, alloy wheels, metallic 
maroon with lots of chrome- 
excellent condition. Asking 
$4,000/or best offer. (708)689- 
4510. 

66-TF-lO j. 

Heavy 
Equipment 

1980 MELROE 610 Bobcat, 
floatation tires, roll cage, new 
cutting edge on bucket, $3,850 
Ask lor Dave (708)438-7437. 

87-45140 
BOLENS 1250 LAWN tractor, 
with front toader, $1,600. After 
Spm (815)675-2701. 




Motorcycles 



^H 



HONDA XL 250 ENDURO 
1,100 miles. Excellent 
condition, $1,100 Best offer. 
Call after Spm (414)857-2983. 
_Jiflb30/rF-177 




YAMAHA, TW200. Endure 
Motorcycle, shown by 
appointment only, garage kept, 
mint conditkin, only 163 miles, 
black and red, street and trail 
legal, paid $2,000 will sacrilice 
for $1,500 (414)862-9557. 

88-45-187 
1986 HONDA SHADOW 
700 cc, V-twin, 5.000 miles, 
windshield, saddle bags, 
excellent condition, $2,500 or 
bestolfer. Call (414)889-8340. 
88-35n"F-120/G 

WANTED TO BUY; Mini-Van. 
Corr^erskin Van or Subutban In 
good condition. Reasonable. 
(815)227-^704. 




Wanted 
To Buy 

JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS- 
Reasonabie priced. Running or 
not! Free removal. (708)838- 
0173 

89-TF/47-36 



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149 |lr«B^kisin«u & Services (708) 223-9111 

-. ..A-svy.y»'..v...»>.s...^.. 



MaMlMiMtMiiUilta 



IumI 



SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1 ,000 

Cash & Carry 

1/2 mile north State IJne R± 

East ofllwy. 45 on County Trunk CI 

HORTONBROS. 

Bristol, Wl 

(414)857-2525 

Mon. ■ Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-3 



4i4:H<^*«r***A***4i**'A***A** 




\ Readings by 
Carta 




FIREWOOD UNLIMITED 

SEASON 2 YEARS 



Mixed Hardwoods $60 F.C. 
Oak $65 

Cherry, Birch, Hickory $75 



[ 



DISCOUNTS ON 2 OR MORE 



Call Anytime 

(708) 888-01 02 



Psychic Consultant Advtsor, * 
Palm, Card, Crystal Ball J{ 

* Reading, Tarrot Card Reading & * 
^ Karma Reading. a 

* Tells Past, PrBs&ntA Future! * 

* Gives advice on all affairs of life * 

* Morrioges - Business - Divorce • Low Suits ^ 

* Private & Confidential Readings * 

* (708)223-9158 * 

^ By Appdnlment Only i, 



SMITH 

Spray-Brush & Roll 



WATERSEAL 
PAINT - STAIN 



Siding, Inm wood dtywall bfock 

stucco, concrolo. 

Wo havo Iho enporioiico ond 'Kc cquipmonl 

la do Iho |ob nghi 

Ffoe Edimtes Roaionable Roioi 

(708) 244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 



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><:::> 




PHONE: 356-7910 
FAX: 356-6747 




ST AGG & ASSOCIATES, INC. 

HOI^rPLAN'SlNi 



arwBtmatmtBU: 



PERMIT READY PLANS 

CUSTOM HOMES SECOND STORIES 

ROOMADDmONS 

REDBSIGNING EXIS UNG HOMES 

FREECONSUnATlON PATSTAdG 



FRIENDLY FIREWOOD 

2 Yr. Old 
Seasoned Hardwood 

' OAK • ASH . lyiAPLE • HICKORY 
$59.00 per FC 

FREE Stacking & Delivery 

Buy the wood that bums 
guaranteed! 

(708) 549-671 



emo's 
DBConArmo 

Interior & Exterior 

Small Repairs 

Fr90 Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

FuHy Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

Quarantee 




KITCHENS, BATHS 
DOOR & WINDOW 

REPLACEMENTS 

SKYLIGHTS, DECKS 

SMALL JOBS A 

SPECIALTY 

Free Estimates 
(7081438-7908 



Our Work Speaks For Itectf 



xt< 




?5V**v".^ 



DECORATIHG} 



'C^^- National Guild of 
ProfesBionol Paper Hanging 

(708) 395-8428 



Friday, November 6, 1992 

i-.t' v.'tpoa'ii* ■ .«.**... 



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Lakeland Newspapen,43. 



Lakeland NvwqMperi'45'' ' 




^.^f^SSys 



^zfc'iijl2£;5«SfcfrSaswtejii5it333aa^B3Saa^^ 



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To AreaBuSineiSS & Services 




Ai 

Lakel 

Newspapers 

(708) 223-8161 



ALUMINUM SIDING 

Soffit & Fascia 
Window Trim • Vinyl 
Replacemeni Windows 

Work Guaranteed 
Insured Free Estimates 

^24 yrs Experience 
EAGLE SIDING CO, 

(708) 526-7222 



Western Lake Counseling 
(708) 587-9700 

• Individual/Marital 

Counseling . 

• Co-dependency; 

• D.U.I. Services 

• Sexual Abuse 

• Relapse Prevention 

by MSW Social Workers. 
Call for appolntrriGnt. Fox Lake. 





fym^^eacu^ 



by Priscllla 
PERSONALIZED 

Quilts • Slipcovers 
Valances • Spreads 
Murals • Woodcrafts 



PRISCILLA SCHOEPP (708)395-6094 



Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 

(708) 740-8800 

Round Lake Park 




RENTAL irjc, 






Fine 
Homes 




by 

Paul Zasadil 

•New Homes •Renovations 
•Additions •Carpentry 

(708)566-4724 




HIGHLAND METALS CORPORATION 



182 Stripe Ct. 
Waukegan, IL 
(708) 360-0880 



R«cycl«: 

Alum Cans, Copper. Brass, Aluminunu Load. Auto 
atterles and Radiators. Catalytic Converters 

mm PRICE5*HONEST WEIGHT 




JON'S CARPET CLEANING SERVICE 

Quick Dry 

Dry Foam Shampoo System 

Vacuumed & Shannpooed 

1 Room $20.00 

2 Rooms $30.00 

Deodorizer & Sllleono Protectant 
Included In Price! 



Discount Rates for Multiple Rooms 



(708) 705-9733 
(708) 817-3057 (pager) 



clasB-sl-f led/ "Itlas-c-f id/ad j 
1: divided Inco classes or 
placed in a class (-ads) 

Why search all over for 
what you're looking for? 
Find it in Lakeland 
Newspapers. The REAL 
Ctasstfied Sections. 



.akelcnd v>^lo5sified 



Free Estimates Insured 

3Jt. HOME EXTERIORS 

Remodeling Experts Serving tlie Lakeland Area Since 1977 

Siding, Eaves & Overhangs, Trim & Gutters 

No Sales Gimmicks - Detailed contract left with homeowner 
- we appreciate contract response within 15 days. 

I Can Beat ALL Sears Estimates! 
JOHN GEBERT (Owner) (708) 587-8772 



T 



T & C METAL CO. 

We recycle aluminunn cans! 



We olio buy 
•Copper ■ Brass 
•Aluminum Siding 
•Aulo Radiators 



Buyers of non-ferrous mefals. 
Industrial accounts welcome. 



•Insulated Wire 
•Lead • Stainless 
•Batteries • Zinc 
•Catalytic Converters 

376 Prairie St. 
.Crystal Lake, IL 



815-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl..8-5; Sat. 8-1 



1 Blocks, of Hwy. 176 
Behind J & L Gas Station 



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PRIVATE AFFAIRS 
BANQUET HALL 



(708)587-9100 



Heaney's Inside 
RV Storage 



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BASEBALL CAPS! 

Polyester, Mesh Back 

Light or Dark Fronts 

$2.49 each! 

144 or more with imprint. 



Call ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 438-7488 



% 







Tired of 
Being Tired? 



Consider the Nutritional Alternative. 
•Patented -^^'^^ 

Product W ^ ' 

•Results J W y 

Guaranteed. %}< — -^ 
708-838-1520 
"Easy "EffectivG 

•Affordable 



D)r-.\0 





Lawn Service 

Call For Free Estimate 
(815)363-1270 



NU-COLOR CABINETS 

AND 

COUNTER TOPS 

Counterlop Replacements 

Hundreds of 
Colors to Choose from 

We will measure, 
build & installl 

(708) 587-0592 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 





«s 

MAINTEHANGE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It AIL 

•Remodeling 

/f/Me/79, BathwGm & Rec Room 

•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

(All Types) 

•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

ill Work fery Well Bene 

FREE ESIIMA1ES, CAU 
(414) S37-2439 



■BCeBC3Rnt)E)BBei9E3eBeBt3BOeeDeBeDE]l3BEa 




OPTIMUM 
PAPERHANGING 

I Experllse in all wall coverings. g 

- Fine DecoraliVB Parnling •MutticolOfed spra/ - 

•Staining 

•Dry wall Repair 

Tool Sa(is/oc(ion Is My Business* | 
(708) 872-0086 § 
(708) 658-3832 i 

Free esli males*) iHured*G(aduale d h 

US.SchoOl of Professional Paporhangfng S 

BeiniBBBneBEriciiEtietiRDiiBiiiiEBBBBDneiea 



■BACHl 

CONiCRBTE COMTRACTORS 



CEMENT WORK 



CUSTOM CONSTRUCTION 

•STEPS • STOOPS • PATIOS • DRIVEWAYS • SIDEWALKS 

• FOUNDATIONS ■ FLOORS • GARAGE FLOORS 

FULLY UCENSED - BONDED • INSURED 



FREE ESTIMATES 



Famluring Stamped S Colored Brtck Stone P0ttema 

RESIDENTIAL 708-395-7938 COMMERCIAL 




* --"^ ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS • DOORS 

DECKS ♦ AWNINGS 

I Repair & Insurance Work 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



Quality 

Craftsmanstiip 

Guaranteed 



TROPP ^sr^^ 
GREEIUHOUSE 

Fresh cut Flowers • 

03.00 a Bunch. 

Potted plants of all kinds. 

Perennial plant 

3" pots 9Sf! ea. 

3 Miles North of Long Grove, 

1/8 Mile North of 

Route 2S on 

Old Mclienry Road. 



Duraclean 

Rated best by 
independent tests. 




Carpet & 
Furniture 
cleaning 

CALL 
TODAYI 

(708) 

587-2356 




B.C; DOG TRfllNING JNC. 

"Where we train you to train your dog" 
Acclaimed by: 

Veterinarians for humane instruction and attention 



•Beginners Obedience 

6 mo. & up 
•Problem Solving 
•Agility Classes 
•Puppy Kindergarten 

2 mo.-5 1/2 mo, 
•Registered Agervi for 

Tatioo-A-Pet 



4i WE OFFER ^ 

All our dassos are limiled in size 

for greater anen Don and help with exerdses. 

Stop In or call for Class 

Schedule 

(708)566-1960 

OBEDIENCE 

CONFORMATION 

«1GILTY 



•Conformation- 
Beginners & Advanced 

•Compoiition Classes 

•Retail Products 

,"Hall Available for Rent 
(Individualand Group) 

•Counseling 



Duraclean 

SPECIALISTS 

Duraclean... ttie standard of 
GXCGlJence tor over 50 years 



TV. VCR. Microwave 

Oven Repair. Antenna/Video Instal.. 

Satellite Dish Install, and Maint. 



ADVANCED ELECTRONICS SERVICE, INC. 

1 109 Washington St. Waukegan, IL 

. (708) 244-1330 







**i9Y^S^^mm9SiVf>i 



Fridoyi, HQV©m*:V8l^, ^ O 



^f^v-^w^^tiijtf^wt*'j.»^-2^riAt*s'JjJA' 






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BftWH EMTE BPBISES 

■ \\a .1 1 ',1) 



REMODELING 



Large or small jobs 

Decks • Additions 

Kitchens • Baths 

Basaments* Utility Sheds 

OvBf 20 Years Experience 



FREE ESTIMATES 




ifi 



** 






«? 



Quality Work at Reasonable Ratea 
708-223-0346 or 1-800-371-0346 




NO AJiomn. mi mm. no waiting c^ 

BUSINESS PLANS . RESUMES AND MORE 
C^ FOR ADDITiaNAL SERVICES OFFERED 
WE THE PEOPI£ BUSINESS CENTER 
(708) 548-1300 




MAIDS 
ON TIME 

Old Fashioned 

Cleaning 

with Modern Maids 

10% Off 

On New Customers 

• Top Quality •Our Supplies 

Call tor Free Estimate 

708-54O-7754 

Insured & Bonded 





ECO WATER" 

STORE 

269 Industrial Dr. 
Wauconda, IL 
(708)487-1480 

Watch for special 
discount flier soon I 




FINANCIAL PLANNING 



Robert Ritzwoller, CPA 

• Tax Deferred Investments 

• Life/Disabiltty Insurance 

• Tax Preparation 

Free fmuciAL Amiysis 

Call for details 

(708) 587-4552 



>r 



L4<^ 



jSAVE WORE BUC^PgP I 







•FALL SPECIALS 

•SENIOR CmZEN DISCOUNTS 

•DRIVEWAYS 

•PARKING LOTS 

•SEAL COATING 

•PATCHING 

•RI^URFACING 

815/96^-8340 
708/931-570a 

FREE ESn^IAl'Ci^ 






Remodeling 
Rewiring 
Service 
Upgrades 

LICENSED - INSURED 
(708) 740-4132 



■ Ceiling Fans 
' Fixtures 
- TV a Telephone 
Jacks Installed 




- Sto* Photos 
' Insurance Photos 

• Slide Presentation 

• Architecture 
. Scenic, Nature 



BASIC 35 MMCAMJinMNSTRUCTIor" 




X 



.Portraits In Your 
Home, On Location 
(Nature) 

• Weddings 

• Parties 



Member of AMTA 
Nationally Certified 



ANDREW R. BIEL, L.M.R 

Licensed Massage Practitioner 



• Stress Ms^Bgement 

• Injury Treatment 

• Deep Relaxation 

For brochure or appointment call 

(708) 395-9020 

362 Lake St. 



First Massage $30- 

Second One FREE 

Gift Certificates Available 



Antioch, IL 



'I 

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m 



RAM Construction 

specializing in Carpentry 
• New 
Construction 
^^ • Remodeling 
Free Estimates - 
Instired 

ROY 
708-740-1447 




DECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 



Custom Decks • Porches 

Room Addilions • Basemenl Remodeling | 
Balhrooms-KitchflRs . Custom Carpertiy 
improvemenls & Repairs! 




INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 
(414) 889-8442 

Pleaao Call Gary Kolkau 



|NationB# 1 Commerdal Cleaning S«Tvice 

FEATURING 

Residential Cleaning 
COMPABE & SAVE 

More Cleaning for the 
Lowest Prices in Town 
All Supplies Provided 

Call Steve Dominick I 

Tbday 

For a Free 

Estimate 

708-838-1102 

Bonded & Insured 



screen Specialties 

Promotional 
Screenprinting 

•WE PRINT ON ANrTHING' 

(708)395-8411 

'Shirts, Jackets, Sweats, Pcrator 
In-House Typesetting. Grophlca 
■FREE SCREEN WlTin OOZ. SHUTS* 

VIsil our fthowToom al 40 120 Rt. 83 y 
8/W Comer of 83 at Grass Lake Rd. 

1.1,000 piecci. 



CARPENTER NEEDS 
MORE WORKl 

Experts in all interior and axterior 

carpentry & remodeling 

Painting, Paper Hanging, 

' Roofing, Siding, Basement, 

Baths, Kitchens, etc. 

Any job large or small 

Over 15 years experience 

Free Estimates 

Call Norm 

(708) 634-4676 



ROSS SHEA 
PLUMBING 

Quality Plumbing at Reasonable Rates 
IL Plumber Lie. #058-131327 

MenlionThisAdlor / 
*1 0°** Off A Service Callir^ 

(708) 587-3091 



OVING YOm PAINTING 
DKCORXnSG NSKDS. 

Complete Inlcrior/Exteriof 

Quality Work - Neatly Done 

FREE Estimates 

AffordcbU Prices 

"Have the job tK)SE wcml" 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24 Ilr. Message 





JK ASPHALT • FREE ESTIMATES 

/SSS SmJiCES • FULLY INSURED 

W mmWm Residential-Commercial 
Driveways, Sealcoat ing. Bob Cat & Truck Sen/ices. Top Soil Del ivery, Sod & Seeding 
I Quality Service Guaranteed \ 

Compare our services and prices. M\\ U you will pay less ior our proiessional Asphalt Services. 

Let us show you what we say Is TRUE! 
(708) 336-9557 we wm beat the competition by 10%! 



■u 



FL OORS y WALK ON 

CarpcU • n«idwood • Ccnunlc • Vinyl 
Kitchen & BBlhroom Remodeling 

RetidenUal & Commercial Intudlation 

MX WORK CUAUAJ^TEED 

J'ree Estimates 
^708) 356-2500 
(708) 310-5220 




HEATING & 
COOLING 

LENNOX ' 

•QUALITY HIGH EFFICIENT 

HEATING SERVICE 

•15 POINT WINTER EFFICENCY 

CHECK 

•AIR CLEANERS-WATER 

HEATERS 
-HUMIDIFIERS 

C««iTnwflwce» 

(708) 526-6286 
(815)459-2300 

^ Sewing Your Community 

/"XN sales-service 

V An Indopanldenl Lennox Dealer 
J|^_ For 25 Years. 

"'liocaOif over 40 years. 



DONT THROW AWAYl 
THAT OLD LAMP, p^ft^ 
BRING IT TO OUR^M 
LAMP DOCTORSt^^ 
FOR BEfift/BS. Aj^jl 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC, 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wildwood, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8691 



B£AV£R' 

Beaver Water Control Systenn 




Rnancing 
Avallibte 



24Hour 
Setvice 



CAREER-RESUME 



•Complete Resume 

Service 

•Laser Printing 

855 S. Rt. 12 

Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-4372 



Diys Up Wet Basements! 



Over 90% of the wet basements in 
this area are caused by water leaks 

in the walls and water seeping in 
where the floor & walls join. What's 
a simple and inexpensive remedy to 
this type of wet Isasement problem? 

Proven in 100.000 homes. 

I A sensible system at a sensible cost! I 

Can Today! I 

ALL DRI COMPANV 



BENTON CARPENTRY 
& DESIGN 

Room Addilions & Remodeling 

Conlraclor 

Free Design Service 

& Estimates 

- Fully Insured 

. Reasonable Rates 

. 20 Years Experience 

(708) 362-0553 



Verrion Hills 



HELMUT MAYER 

Roofing All Types 

New Roofing & Repairs 

Interior / Exterior Painting 

Gutters Cleaned, Repaired. 

Replaced 'Tuckpointing 

Stonm Windows Installed 

Pressure Washing ■ Carpentry 

FREE ESTIMATES * INSURED 

708-B26-6789 



r 



COUPON-' 



FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 

"Positive Training With Positive Results" 

' All iralnino metfiods are not alike. Come visit us during classes and observe a dif- 
fo em approach to d^ training. Our methods utilize food, enthusiasm and pra.se^ 
LnTiSVare broken down into pieces both dogs and owners can manage. We 
TaveTises rpuppresa°d older Sogs. and for al levels of obedience oompoti.on 
training. For more information please give us a call. 
20970 White Road - Anlloch, IL 60002 • (708) 838.0523| 



I]L 



3SB 



BUVING 

Aluminum Cans 

•COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-0788 

HOURS: 

Mon. -FrI. 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sat, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

closod 12-12:30 for lunch 

Receive 2« MORE per pound 
I over our current prices on 

1**^ aluminum cons ^ 

i^T"-^^^ irt^- 1 

Expires xi-SiHWt | 



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Teamwork 

College of Lake County's Sharon Allen and Kathy Filkey team up for a block 
against Daley. CLC won three games to one in first round of sectional 
tournament. — Photo by Gene Gabry. 



Inspired Carmel responds, 
ready for 'second season* 



U'y 



When it comes to inspiration, few 
schools in the state could lop the effort of 
the Carmcl Corsairs prior to ihe season 
finale against Benct Academy. 

"We did a number of things. Wc had a 
meeting on the field in the dark on 
Thursday, wc had a highlight film shown, 
and wc had t-shirts with 6-3 or 5-4 written 
on them and Mike Dunn, Round Lake 
coach, came to speak to the team,". 
Carmel Coach Mike Fitzgibbons said. 

AH of the above paid off for Carmcl. 
The Corsairs reached the playoffs for the 
first lime in three years with a 34-6 win 
over Bcncl. The Corsairs batllcd against 
anolhcr 6-3 team, Rockford Guilford, in 
the first round of the Class 5a playoffs. 

The ground game was again ihc major 
weapon for ihc Corsairs. Carmcl running 
backs finished the regular season with 
1,809 yards. Jermainc Williams, who 
scored a touchdown against Benct, had 
656 yards while J.D. Clark had 454. 

"The imporiant thing is menially, wc 
are playing real good football," 
Fitzgibbons said. 

"There is a tendency to be satisfied with 
making the playoffs, but wc want to try 
and win," Fitzgibbons said. 

Guilford, also a 6-3 icam, used the 
power I formation. 

The Corsairs were given up for dead af- 
ter a loss lo Notre Dame ihe week before, 
but the players weren't about lo quit 

"Our goal was to make the playoffs. Wc 
just dug deep," Clark said. 

Clark scored on an 82-yard run which 
gave ihc Corsairs a 24-6 second half lead. 
"The end zone seemed lo be getting farther 
away," he joked. 

Williams, who admires Barry Sanders of 
the.Lions, had high praise for the way the 
offensive line developed. 
Clark had 131 yards and Williams 65 



and QB Tony Longmire 84 against the 
Redwings. 

Longmire ncllcd iwo one-yard touch- 
down runs, the second giving Carmcl a 
17-6 halfiimc lead. 

The kicking game continued to be 
strong. James Bclruccl had 25 and 31 -yard 
field goals and four extra poinis. "Both 
field goals were from tough angles," 
Fitzgibbons said. 

Both Williams and Clark know the 
Corsairs have a lough go of it in the East 
Subruban Catholic Conference, where 
they were 4-3. The ESCC produced five 
teams with winning records. "The ESCC 
is probably the most competitive confer- 
ence in the slate," Clark said. 



Pats' bid 
for state 
soccer halted 

Stevenson High School's soccer team 
was turned back for its bid for the slate 
finals by Evanslon by a 2-1 score. 

Curt Thomas netted the Stevenson 
score with 3:24 left. The Wildkits had 
gained scores by Jermainc Wilke and 
Marcel lo Fcrrino lo post the superscc- 
tional win, 

The victory advances Evanslon to the 
slate final at Naperville North against 
in Friday's quarterfinals while 
Stevenson ends 21-5-1. The Pats won 
the North Suburban Conference title 
and sectional in penalty kicks over 
Libcrtyvillc. ^ . 



Bulldogs look 
as an advanta 

Each week, football coaches tell their 
players the opposing team is not a push- 
over. The old "on any given day" clich6. 

Now, in the second seaSon, the saying 
turns into words lo live by as teams ad- 
1: yance to the post-season tournament ac- 
tion. Wauconda did not have to rely on 
playoff poinis as the Bulldogs took care of 
Johnsburg 34-13 but the Lake Zurich 
Bears were on edge after losing lo 
McHcnry 14-7. It was about dinner time 
when the Bears received the good news 
Saturday ihat ihcy would face the Bulldogs 
in first-round action Wednesday. The win- 
ner advances lo ihc second round Nov. 7 
against ihc Round Lake, Cary-Grove vic- 
tor. 

"The players understand there arc no' bad 
teams in ihc playoffs," Wauconda Coach 
Bob Kasper said. 

Lake Zurich comes into ihc game with a 
6-3 mark, after falling 14-7 in the season 
finale lo McHcnry. The Bulldogs upset 
Crystal Lake Central before falling lo in 
Class 4a last year. 

'Tm sure it will. You can tell with the 
attitude at practice today." Kasper said 
Sunday. 

The Bulldogs (7-2, 3-2 in ihc Northwest 
Suburban Conference) received strong per- 
formances once again from quarterback 
Byron Johnsori and Randy Brill. 

"Byron has just done an outstanding job 
the last two years on offense and defense. 
He has a great ability lo throw the ball and 
he is one of our toughest hitters on de- 
fense," Kasper said. 

What kept the Skyhawk defense guessing 
was the play of fullback Kevin Cajda. He 
set up Johnson's first TD with 21 yards in 
four carries on a 56-yard march. 

Johnsburg's Russ Smith got the visitors 
on the board first wilh a four-yard run. 



to use past 
ge in playoffs 

Brill immediately answered that with a 76- 
yard kickoff return for a TD. 

"Punting, kickoff, defensive back, slot 
back, he does it," Kasper said of Brill. 

Johnson scored on an 18-yard run for a 
14-7 Wauconda halfiimc lead. 

The second half was a show by the 
Wauconda offense for the home fans. 

"Their ability lo control the ball. We did 
not get too many offensive plays in the . 
third quarter," Johnsburg Coach Hap 
Farlow said. 

"In the second half, Ihey only ran two of- 
fensive scries. We were able lo control the 
ball. That is a great asset going into ihc 
playoffs." Kasper said. 

The option offense clicked when 
Johnson connected with Brill on a 37-yard 
touchdown pass. 

Johnsburg's Pal Brey scored on a reverse 
kickoff return for the second lime in three 
weeks, this time he rambled for 90 yards. 

But Johnson added a two-yard TD run and 
two fourth quarter field goals scaled the 
fate. 

Defensive lacklc Nate Bowers, Abe 
Frontzak and linebacker Ben Seelyc all had 
consistent games as iHc Johnsburg rushing 
game was shut down. 

The Bulldogs could not slop Johnsburg 
wide receiver Todd Frcund. Frcund caught 
10 passes for 113 yards as QB John Paul 
Dudley was ll-for-17 for 133 yards. 

"Todd is one of the lop five receivers in 
ihc Chicagoland area. He's just a good ath- 
lete," Farlow said. 

Johnsburg, after two near misses for ihc 
playoffs, closes the year 3-6. But Dudley 
and his group of talented juniors return and 
a highlight was a second straight win 
against playoff-bound and NWSC champ 
Round Lake. Five Johnsburg opponents, 
in fact, made ihc post-season playoffs. 



Champion Grayslake leads 
all-NWSC volleyball picks 



Unbeaten Grayslake leads this fall's 
Northwest Suburban Conference all- 
league volleyball conlingeni wilh four 
players seleclcd, three unanimously. 

Seniors Allison Waldenstrom and Nikki 
Bonfanli and junior Julie Davis led the 
way. The Rams were 15-0 in conference, 
easily lopping second-place Johnsburg's 
11-4. 

The Skyhawks were represented by 
Christy Richards, Lynclle Regner and 
Dawn StcwarL 

Marian Central had iwo unanimous 



picks, Jenny Nccse and Madeline Stahl. 

Kristcn Wisniewski was unanimous 
pick from Wauconda. 

Erin Klein, a unanimous selection, rcp- 
rescnlcd Grant. She is a senior. 

Round Lake's icam member is Mary 
Theisen, a senior. 

Wauconda had two honorable mention 
team members, Christie Egcrt and Natalie 
Ward. 

Johnsburg's Katy Grilmackcr made that 
learn as did Round Lake's Kim Albanesc, 
a senior. 



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46 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



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Lakeland's SPORTS 



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Marathon soccer struggle proves sweet for Patriots 



It was rainy, gelling cold 
and late on Halloween 
Saturday night in 
Lincolnshire. • 

None of the above mat- 
tered to those gathered to 
watch a sectional soccer 
championship end the way 
it should have between two 
evenly matched teams as 
Stevenson and Libertyville. 

The two squads, battling 
for the unofficial Lake 
County soccer champi- 
onship and an official bid 
to the Sweet 16, conducted 
a marathon soccer clinic for 
100 minutes. Senior 



Mitchell Bornstein beat 
Libertyville goalie Jeff 
Cuilla for the 2-1 win. The 
victory moved Stevenson 
(21-4-1) to a Superscctional 
match with Evanston. 
while the Wildcats were left 
at the allcr for ihe second 
straight year. 

Bornstein is usually in 
the second group of 
shootout kickers, but an in- 
jury put him in the spot- 
light. . 

"Milch stepped in. He is 
a real solid player in 
practice, so we knew he 
was going to put it in," 



Stevenson's Brian Downs 
said. 

"He (the Libertyville 
goalie Ciulla) almost got a 
hand on it, but I got it in," 
Bornstein said. 

The duo. combined back 
in the first half for a 
Stevenson goal by Downs , 
with Bornstein getting the 
assist. 

"Mitch has cither assisted . 
or scored on every big goal 
we have needed this year. 
He comes off the bench. He 
changes ihe strategy the de- 
fense has to play because 
he plays different than ihe 



Champ Panthers* Farmer 
earns MVP in all-NWSC 



Two-time defending 
champion Round Lake led 
Ihe way in all-Northwest 
Suburban Conference soccer 
team selections, including 
most valuable player. 

Senior midfielder Jody 
Farmer of tlie Panthers won 
the league MVP. 

He is one of seven Round 
Lake players on the team as 
the Panthers went 7-0-1 . 




Two sophomores, forwards 
Julio Duran and Carlos 
Mariscal made the team. 
Junior fullback Mauricio. 
Tovar will also return. 

Seniors from Round Lake 
on the squad arc: midfielder 
Leon Duran;. goalie Joe 
Meyer; sweeper Tony 
Pranschkc. 

Grayslakc was second in 
Ihe conference at 4-3-1. 

Grayslakc representatives 
are: senior sweeper John 
Brown; senior halfback 
Matt Cullcn; junior forward 
William Kelly and senior 
fullback Brian White. 

Wauconda had a 4-4 mark. 
Bulldogs on the team are: 



junior midfielder Andy 
Corelli; junior goalie Bill 
Dunkcl; junior midfielder 
Damian Jackson. . 

Johnsburg's Eric Bauer, a 
senior forward, and junior 
forward Chris Lynk were 
chosen. Johnsburg finished 
at 3-3-2. 

Marian Central was 0-8. 

Slcv Lingle, a senior 
defenscman from 
Johnsburg, made the 
honorable mention list. 
Also on the team' arc: 
Wauconda junior forward 
Kurt VanAIstine; Round 
Lake's juniors, halfback 
Mauricio Vazquez and 
forward Os\yaIdo Vcrgara. 



other two forwards. He dis- ■ 
rupls. things quite quickly 
and he is a liule fresher. He 
has been doing this all 
year," Stevenson Coach 
Mark Schartner said. 

"I could not be more 
proud of this team. This 
was our goal — to go one 
step farther than last year," 
headdcd. 

Evanston downed 
Glenbard South 3-2 to 
reach .the rematch with 
Stevenson at New Trier. 

"The one goal they scored 
(Liberiyvillc's Andy 
Manton) that was my fault, 
I was glad it went into a 
shootout because I thought 
I had a good chance to 
make up for it," Stevenson 
goalie Elliot Matthias said. 
"The last one I saved (by 
Brad Webster) was some- 
thing 1 have been trying to 
practice on, taking a step to 
the right or left. I made 
him go to the left and I 
can't believe I got iL 

"In between shots, I was 
concentrating, just trying 
not to get too nervous 
about it. Their goalie did a 
"hcckuva job, too. When 
you get to penally kicks 
and you save one, that is 
usually good enough," 
Mathias said. 

Malhias stuffed 
Libcrtyville's Manlon as he 
came out and blocked the 
shot. 

Chris Thomas scored first 
in the shootout for 



Stevenson, but that was 
matched by Todd Arbiturc. 
Downs put ihc Pals ahead 
2-1 but Dave Dupor re- 
gained a tic. Brian Eby 
scored, setting up 
Bomstcin's heroics. 

As Libenyviilc fans stood 
in front of the railing of 
their side of the packed 
stands at Stevenson High 
wondering what happened, 
Stevenson celebrated, com- 
plete with a drenching for 
Schartner. 

"It feels really good. This 
has been a goal of ours for 
a long time. To beat 
Libertyville twice this year, 
and hopefully go downslate 
now were a game away 
from going downstale," 
Malhias said. 

"This is how we did it in 
the sectional semi-finals 
against the same team. 
Mathias is one of the best 
goalies in the stale. We 
work hard on those penally 
kicks, but our best kicker 
missed. This is a team that 
deserves to be here. They 
worked hard, played the 
sirongcst schedule we could 
possibly get," Schartner 
said. 

"This is what a high 
school final should be like. 
There must have been 
2,000 people here tonight. 
When you get to the final, 
the crowds arc dispersed. It 
doesn't get any better than 
this. You can experience 
this only a few times," 



Schartner exclaimed. 

"It was a great game. It's 
tood bad we have to be in 
the same sectional. I think 
we are both worthy of 
Sweet Sixteen, but that's 
the way it goes. Iwish it 
did not come down to 
penalty kicks. It's lough 'to 
lose this way," Libertyville 
Coach Andy Biila said. 

The Wildcats, who lost to 
Stevenson- for the Norlh 
Suburban Conference title, 
challenged Mathias early in 
the second half. Direct 
shots by Webster and 
Hunter were tamed away by 
the Pats goalie before 
Manton scored to tic the 
match with 28:27 left, 

"We knew e had to try 
and pick it up because we 
played so bad the first half. 
We did not even a decent 
opportunity the first half. 
We had to keep the ball on 
the ground and keep going 
with it and we did. We got 
our goal. Wc'just did not 
get a second one," Bitla 
said. 

Libertyville was the tour- 
ney's top seed and came in 
after a 4-2 win over Lake 
Forest, who had eliminated 
Carmel. 

Manlon, Arbiulure, 
Hunter and Taylor scored as 
the 'Cats rallied from a 2-1 
deficit 

Stevenson shutout 
Buffalo Grove 3-0 as 
Downs, Nick Moons and 
Deck scored. 



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Lakeland's SPORTS 



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DuPase ends CLC kickers season, but pluses remain 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

If one wanted to raise the 
ire of a College of Lake 
County men's soccer player, 
mention the "D" team. 

That's the College of 
DuPage which proved lo be 
the nemesis for the Lancers 
this fall, preventing a per- 
fect season and a spot in the 
national junior college 
tournament. The Eagles 
turned back the Lancers 2-1 
Saturday in overtime, as the 
Lancers ended with a 
school-history best 16-2 



mark. 
"It was tremendously dis- 
appointing to lose the 
match, but I am cxUcmcly 
pleased that the kids played 
hard. This was their best 
match of the year," CC 
Coach Dave Beck said. 

DuPagc's Mike Grassi 
netted the game-winning 
goal after a scramble in 
front of the CLC net, mid- 
way through the first over- 
time. 

CLC's Joe Carver, off an 
assist from Omar Pachcco, 
lied the match at 1-1. 



The Lancers went with 
goalie Chris Caprc, a 
freshman from Stevenson, 
the whole way, as opposed 
to their usual method of al- 
ternating Caprc with Jeremy 
Dozicr. 

"DuPage is a team that 
likes to hit the ball high 
into the net and Capre is a 
little taller," Beck said. 

Both teams had chances 
late in the second half and 
in the overtime. "Carver had 
a shot that was on line and 
Omar had a shot that the 
goalie slabbed. It was a fan- 



tastic match. It was the 
mo.st exciting match I have 
been involved in since com- 
ing to CLC," Beck said. 

The season highlights in- 
cluded a second straight 
Skyway Conference title 
and being nationally ranked. 
But it was that "D" team, 
DuPage, which slopped the 
Lancers. 

Carver, of Dcerfield, fin- 
ished his CLC career with 
63 goals. 31 this year. 
"When we talked to Joe 
over the summer, I said he 
might have lo concentrate 



on other things like assists 
and defense. He is definitely 
the best player we have ever 
had," Beck said. 

Joe Braido, a co-capiain 
with Carver, was a key 
player at sweeper. He 
teamed with Alan Noon and 
Charlie Mulnix as CLC al- 
lowed the fewest goals 
scored ever, 15 in 18 
matches. 

Noon, Dozier, Carver and 
Braido will all be lost to 
graduation. 

CLC downed Harper 5-1. 
Carver scored the first two 



goals, off assists from 
Edward Frisch and Noon. 
Braido scored unassisted and 
Noon had two goals, with 
assists from Carver and Eric 
Schachclmayer. 

Carver scored three goals 
and two players had one 
goal each 'as the College of 
Lake County soccer team 
started the Region IV tour- 
ney with a 5-1 win over 
Triton. 

Schachlcmeycr and Mike 
Gugliclmo scored the other 
goals for CLC. 



Patriots put a scare, but Warren holds lead in finale 



Estates-Fremd 



It was, after all, the night both teams celebrating and year, though, Warren (7-2, Hoffman 

before Halloween. confusion. 6-1 North Suburban winner. 

An event called Fright In the end, both teams had Conference) was at With his team trailing 13- 

Fcst was happening at Six their seasons extended into Belviderc in the first round 12, Warren quarterback 

Flags Great America, just a the playoffs four days later, Wednesday. If Warren won, Mark Leginski saw a hole 

long punt away from the but the finish made for great "^' "' - '^— -•- *"— -' ■'-- '- '•-- '' '■'-" 



never to get in. That is 
something I told them all 
year long. The third or 
fourth man cannot afford to 
relax because ail of a sudden 



Warren Township High theater. 

School football field. The Blue Devils started the 

So maybe it was not all playoffs the same way as 

that unusual that the regular the quarterfinalist Class 5a 

season finale ended with team did last year. This 



Grant has high 
after improved 



the Blue Devils faced the in the Stevenson line, 
McHenry-Freeport winner changed a play call and 
in the second round, sneaked in from the one. 
Stevenson (6-3) hosted Stevenson's Nate Smith 
Conant in 6a first-round ac- led the Patriots on a furious 
tion, seeking a spot against comeback attempt, after an 

interception by Mark 
Griffin. 

Completing passes to Fred 
Dasso, he brought the ball 
to the Warren three with 18 
seconds left. He tossed a 



by GREG MILLER 

Lakeland Newspapers 

"Expectation level" is son." 

the phrase Grant football Although Grant will 

coach Mark Barczak is us- lose some top performers to 

ing these days, and he says graduation, a strong junior 

that level is high in the class will be back after 

Bulldogs' camp. gaining valuable experience 

Despite closing the sea- this season. And, Barczak 

son on a losing note and has reinforcements on the 

out of the playoff picture, way. Grant's freshmen and 

the Bulldogs finished 4-5 — sophomore teams both won 

a far cry from last year's 0-9 their respective Northwest 

mark. Suburban Conference titles 

"I'm very happy about this year. 



hopes 
finish 

Junior quarterback 



the progress we made," 
Barczak said after his first 
year as head coach. "The 
program is at a much higher 
level than it was 12 months 
ago. We feel we can play 



right track and on to bigger 

and better things next sea- Shawn Powers passed for 

1,296 yards and 10 touch- 
downs. 

The defensive leader was 
junior linebacker Brett 
Bending, who piled up 102 
total tackles and two fumble 
recoveries and returned an 
interception for a touch- 
down. 

The Bulldogs dropped 
their final game of the year 
to Marian Central 41-20. 

Marian quarterback Dirk 
Suinger (12 of 23 for 228 



For the season, senior 
Mike Ward led Grant in 

rushing with 658 yards and yards and two TD's) and 

five TD's on 142 carries. He Powers (14 of 28 for 219 

averaged 4.6 yards per cany, yards and three TD's) set off 

Senior Tim Culolta was ^^ fireworks, 

with anyone in the confer- tops in receptions with 28 "We couldn't put the ki- 

encc next year. for 361 yards and four bosh on their quarterback," 

"I'm not satisfied, but touchdowns, while Ward Barczak said. "When he had 

I'm happy," Barczak contin- caught 21 passes for 384 to make a big play, he did. 

ued. "I think we're on the yards and five TD's. He was the difference." 



Football Report 



W'-A 



> .-■ 



Libertyville 19, N, Chicago 




Lake Zurich 


4 3 


6 


3 




4)6'^ 


ZioD-Benton t4, Anlioch 7 
Carmel 34, Benci Acad, 6 
McHenry 14, Lake Zurich 7 




CL South 
Dundce-Q 
CL Genual 


4 3 
2 5 
2 5 


5 
3 
3 


4 
6 
6 


ByroQ 
Hampshire 
Forrcston 
Oregon 


3 2 3 6 
2 4 4 5 
I 4 3 6 
5 9 


Wauconda 34, Johnsburg 13 




Jacobs 


2 5 


2 


7 


MaiianC. 41, Grant20 




Woodstock 


1 6 


?. 


7 


Round Lake 40, Grayslakc 
Wairen 19, Stevenson 13 




Northwest Suburban Conf. 




Scores by quarters 


Mundelein 36, Fenton 33 






Conf. 




An 






Richmond-B. 30, Oregon 12 






W L 


W 


L 


Stevenson 


0-13-0-0-13 






MananC. 


4 1 


6 


3 


Warren 


12-0-0-7-9 


H'i A. 1 • 




Round Lake 


4 1 


5 


4 






^t^naiiii 


1 


Wauconda 


3 2 


7 


2 








» 


Grant 


2 3 


-4 


5 


Round Lake 


7-13-13-7-40 


Ea?t Suburban Cath. ConL 




J(rfinsburg 


2 3 


3 


6 


Grayslake 


0-0-0-0-0 


Conf 


All 


. Grayslake 


5 





9 






W L W 


L 










Mundelein 


6-14-8-8-36 


JolietCath. 7 8 


1 


North Suburi>an Conf. 






Fenton 


0-14-7-12-33 


Notre Dame 6 I 7 


2 




Conf. 




An 


. 




Marian Cath 6 1 6 


3 




W L 


W 


L 


Marian C. 


7-13-7-13-41 


^Carmel 4 3 6 


3 


Lake Forst 


9 .0 


9 





Grant • 


0-14-6-0-20 


Marist 3 4 5 


4 


Warren 


6 .2 


7 


2 






Su Viator 3 4 4 


5 


Stevenson 


6 2 


6 


3 


Johnsburg 


7-0-6-13 


Benet 3 4 3 


6 


Libertyville 


5 3 


5 


4 


• Wauconda 


14-0-14-6-34 


St Joseph 2 5 4 


5 


N. Ciiicago 


4 4 


5 


4 






StPalnck I 3 2 


7 


Zion-B. 


3 5 


3 


6 


Oregon 


0-0-12-0-12 


Holy Cross 7 1 


8 


Mundelein 


2 6 


2 


7 


Ridimond-B. 


8-8-8-6-30 


■: 




Antioch 


9 





9 






Fox VaUey Conf. 












Carmel 


7-10-7-10-34 


Conf. 


AH 


Big Northern 


White Division 


Benet 


6-0-0-0-6 


W L W 


L 




Conf. 




AO 






McHenry ^ 7 Q 9 







W L 


W 


L 


Libertyville 


7-6-6-0-19 


Cary-G. 6 1 7 


2 


Genoa-K. 


5 


8 


1 


N. Chicago 


0-0-0-0-0 



Leary's run. 

"Our kids played their 
hearts, out," Stevenson 
Coach Bill Miu said. 
Warren had to make some 

adjustments along its offen- you are a starter and you're 

sivc line because Brandon not ready to play," Hughes 

Schild broke a hand in the said. 

Tirst half. Warren quarterback Mark 

Warren's star runner. Bob Leginski said the team used 

Olson, topped the 1,200 Schild's injury as halftime 

yard mark with an 188 yard inspiration, 

night and had two first-quar- In fact, the Warren medical 

tcr touchdown runs. staff was lookingat X-Rays 

That did have a negative of Schild's injury when the 

side affccL Blue Devils marched in the 

"We're high school kids, third quarter. Tim Maiabclla 

pass to Regan Earl, the Pals When you score two quick gained 23 yards on a key 

rushed the field, thinking scores like we did, no mat- play, 

they had tied the game. But tcr how poor you play, you Leginski said" his passing 

after moments of confusion, always, in the back of your game needs work, 

the visitors were assessed a mind, think you are going "1 think he is hot and cold 

five-yard motion penalty. lo put one in. They re- but that's Mark. When he is 

They got one more play sponded and made some on, he is tough. When he h 

with 0:00 left on the clock changes defensively," cold, he is poor. Yio knows 

and went lo Farjai Lcary. Hughes said. • that and responds pretty 

But WaiTcn's Greg Herlihy, Mark Sabor came in at well. He has taken a lot of 

a senior linebacker, came up tight end, and played a bet- pressure. It is a lot of pres- 

with the crucial hit. tcr second half. "When you sure to follow in the fool- 

"I didn't want it lo end dial sit behind a kid like Foul steps of Craig Shellon," 

way," Herlihy said of (Matt) or Schild, you expect Hughes said. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY INCREASE 
FOR WILDWOOD PARK DISTRICT • 

I. A public hearing to approve a proposed property tax levy 
increase for WILDWOOD PARK DISTRICT for the fiscal 
year 1992-1993 will be held on November 17, 1992 at the 
Warren Township Center, 7137 Washington Street, Gurnee, 
Illinois at 7:30 P.M. 

Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and 
present testimony to the taxing district may contact 
LAWRENCE D. WALKER at 708/223-7275. 

II. The Corporate and special purpose property taxes 
extended for 1 991 -1 992 were $1 25,408.29. 

The proposed corporate and special purpose property 
taxes to be levied for 1992-1993 are $205,800.00. This rep- 
resents a 64.10 percentage increase over the previous year. 

III. The property taxes extended for debt service and pub- 
lic building commission leases for 1991-1992 were -0-. 

The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service 
and public building commission leases for 1992-1993 are -0-. 
This represents no increase over the previous year. 

IV. The total property taxes extended for 1991-1992 were 
$125,408.29. 

The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 1992- 
1993 are $205,800.00. This represents a 64.10 percentage 
increase over the previoijs year. 

That said hearing is held in accordance with an Act known 
as "The Truth in Taxation Act". 

LAWRENCE D. WALKER, President 
WILDWOOD PARK DISTRICT 

.1192A-178-WN| 
November 6, 1992 



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Lakeland's SPORTS 







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Stevenson spikers prove just too much for Rams 



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by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

OK Grayslake, bring the more boister- 
ous fans, the pom-pons and have the vol- 
leyball players toss suckers into to your' 
faithful. 

It's OK to even score a few points, even 
lead for a while, because you're up against 
not only Stevenson's 34-3 record, but sto- 
ried past in post-season volleyball' suc- 
cess. The Pats have qualified for the Elite 
Eight the last two seasons. . 

In the end, that Stevenson mystic 
proved to be too intimidating for the 
Rams, whose storybook season ended at 
27-4 with a 15-8, 15-6 loss. The win 
advances the Patriots to the sectional final 
Thursday against Libertyville, which 
dusted off Zion-Benton in two games. The 
Pals arc used to being in sectional play, 
having advanced to that level the last 
seven years. . It was Grayslake's first 
appearance in sectionals in nine years. 

Two freshmen, Anna Hamilton and 
Katie Coleman, who delivered the 
knockout blows for the Pats. 

Hamilton and junior Christine Choi 
served to give the Pats a 5-0 game two 
lead. Hamilton's kill gave the 
Lincolnshire team its 14th point, setting 
up the match-winning service point from 
Dawn Huckc. 

"It is so exciting to be here," Hamilton 
said. 

Hamilton had five kills, six service 
points and was 19-for-20 setting with two 
assists. 

The Rams had lost to Stevenson in the 
final of the Lake County Classic, 6ut 
were optimistic because they scored 13 
points in the second game. Although the 
scores may appear lopsided, the Northwest 
Suburban Conference champs forced 



Stevenson to several long rallies. 

"I just tried to stdy calm, because I was 
trying to do that the entire match," 
Hamilton said. 

"I told Anna to call a timeout. 'Relax, 



Annha. You look like you arc going to 
break in two you arc so intense. She had 
some good swings at the ball in the sec- 
ond game," Stevenson Coach Bob Schenk 
said. 




Take that 

Stevenson's Tiffaney DeBott blocks a kill attempt by Grayslake's Casey Sanford 
. Stevenson advanced witti two-game win at Highland Park sectional. Looking 
on are Jennie Dunbar (4) and Allison Waldenstrom ot Grayslake. 



Schenk respected the Rams and their 
standout, senior Allison Waldenstrom. 

"We know she had over 200 kills. The 
hitting did not hurt us. There were some 
errors of aggresiveness," Schenk said. 

Serving was a force for the Patriots, 
who were led by Choi's eight points and 
Hamilton's six. "We did it against Lake 
Forest and here. We served to areas of the 
court where their players are not quite 
ready to hit the ball. Serving was a very 
big asset for us." 

"I think the team as a whole has im- 
proved a great deal this year," Schenk 
said. 

Waldenstrom got the sizeable Grayslake 
rooting section going with a kill for a 1-0 
lead. A Stevenson error gave the Rams a 
2-0 lead. Grayslake also led 3-2 before 
Choi paced the Pals to a 6-3 margin and 
the Stevenson squad outscorcd Grayslake 
on a 4-1 stretch, taking command. 

Stevenson led 7-0 in game two before 
the Rams scored their first point 

"I feel like the little boy with his finger 
in the dike trying to hold it back. They 
have a lot of offense. Their serving set us 
back a bit," Grayslake Coach Dan Stacey 
said. 

The Rams, though, held their heads 
high. 

"That is a tough bunch of girls, a lot of 
heart, but not much size," Stacey said. 

"Allison has been our strongpoiiit as far 
as kills. They set up pretty well on that. 
The line was open, but with the big girls 
blocking her on the net, it was tough for 
her," Stacey said. 

The key to the Rams was passing. "I 
was a litUe disappointed in our passing. 
Usually we are a pretty good passing 
team," Stacey said. 



Sriver's serving gives *Cats needed spark, Pats next foe 



Katie Srivcr knew what 
she had to do as the second 
game started in the 
Highland Park sectional 
volleyball tournament 
against Zion-Benton. 

"Coach Trzyna gave us a 
talking to at the end of the 
first game. I just try and 
find a hole that is there. We 
were confident we could 
win and happy we could do, 
" Srivcr said. 

"We're looking for revenge 



on Stevenson," she added. 
Srivcr served for the first 

eight points of the second 
game as the Wildcats 

quickly ended any Zion- 
Benton hopes of picking up 
where they left off at the 

end of the first game in a 
15-5,15-2 romp. Although 
not artistic, the win 

improved the Wildcats to 
28-6 overall and more 
importantly, into a 



sectional title match against 
Stevenson Thursday. The 
winner advances to the 
Schaumburg superscctional 
Nov. 7. 

Sriver was a perfect 16-for- 
16 passing with 13 points. 

In setting, she was 14-for- 
14 with five aces. Other 
leaders for the Wildcats 
were: Jen McNeil with five 
points and seven-for-seven. 

The Libertyville 



contingent decided the short 
contest was not an artistic 
success, however. 

"You know you arc not 
mentally there when you 
start missing serves. That's 
not against Zion. There was 

just never a flow in cither 
direction. When the pace did 
pick up, we were able to 
dom inate wl th 

aggressiveness. We were 
always a little out of sync," 



Trzyna said. 

Libertyville led 9-0 before 
Zion scored its first point in 
die first game. The Wildcats 
led 12-2, but missed serves 
and a sideout allowed the 
Zee-Bees a chance to get 
back into the game. Zion 
gained three points before 
the Wildcats' Sriver finished 
the game. 

"I was pleased with the 
way we came out in the 



second game," Trzyna said. 

Sriver was 14-for-14 with 
five assists in setting. 
Ashley Marquart was 11- 
for-11 with three assists and 
Lauren Chamberlain was 
five-for-fivc with two 
assists. 

Libertyville was coming 
off an emotional two-game 
win over Mundclcin for the 
Mundelein regional title 
while the Zee-Bees won 
their own regional. 



Tough foes help Panthers 



There were no drastic 
changes as the Round Lake 
Panthers prepared for their 
second playoff tourney in 
three years. 

"You want to do what 
worked well and repeat it 
again and again," Round 
Lake Coach Mike Dunn 
said. 

The Round Lake 
comeback from an 0-3 
season start was made 
complete when the Panthers 
won the Northwest 
Suburban Conference title 
with a 40-0 thrashing of 
Grayslake. 

Round Lake qualifies as 
one of only two 5-4 teams 
in the tournament with a 4- 
I NWSC mark. The 
Panthers played at Cary- 
Grove in the first round of 
the Class 4a game against 
the powerful 7-2 Trojans. 

"Cary-Grove is the most 
balanced team we will see 
all year," Dunn said. Round 
Lake was seeking to set up 
an intra-county or even all 
NWSC matchup in the 
second round Saturday, as 
the winner plays the 



Wauconda-Lakc Zurich 
victor. 

Dunn points to one of the 
most challenging non- 
conference schedules in the 

You want to do what 
worked well . ' 
—Coach Mike Dunn 

area: McHcnry, Discoll, 
Glenbard South as a big 
factor. 

One of the more 
consistent aspects of the 
Round Lake weapons has 
been the punting of Justin 
Koski. 

"Koski has got to be one 
of the better punters in the 
county. He averages 36 
yards a kick. Before each 
practice, he works with Tate 
Martens, our trainer, who is 
a former punter," Diinn 
said. 

Another big factor in the 
comeback was the switch 
Bob Swanson made from 
QB to tight end, allowing 
Clint Rodriqucz to do the 
signal calling. 



Defensive coordinator Pat 
Coon was given credit for 
molding the defense while 
Bruce Barlosz handled the 
line play. 

"Coach Banosz is a legend 
around here. It is satifying 
and great to see him take a 
line of juniors who never 
played before and see how 
they play on both sides of 
the ball," Dunn said. 

Speaking of going both 
ways, Aaron Yazzic fits that 
description to a "T", "He 
has a great work ethic. He 
plays as hard as he 
practices," Dunn said. 

Round Lake was in 
command from the gci-go 
against the winless Rams. 

Luke Tcsch scored the 
first of three touchdowns on 
a five-yard run for a 6-0 lead 
with Vinnie Lira booting 
one of four extra points. 

Lira scdred himself from 
10 yards out in the third 
quarter. Bob Tellcz 
scampered home from 27 
yards out in ilie third quarter 
and Bob Swanson 
completed the scoring with 
a two-yard fouth quarter TD. 



Bears lose final game, 
hang on to play-off spot 



by RHONDA VINZANT 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Despite a 14-7 loss to McHcnry in the 
final game of the season, the Lake Zurich 
Bears advanced to the first round of the 
playoffs meeting Wauconda, Wednesday 
evening. 

The Bears made the play-off berth with a 
6-3 record based on the number of points 
scored during the season. 

The season has been a Cinderella story 
on the gridiron with the Bears posting a 
winning record following a 2-7 season 
last year when they went 0-7 in the 
conference. "Coming off last season 
anything would have been and 
improvement," said nine-year head Coach . 
Wayne Kuklinski. "We anticipated 
improvement but I did not expect to do as 
well as we did." 

Kuklinski contributes the winning 
season to a lot of hard work from the 
players in the weight room and during the 
off-season. 

The Bears climbed out of a 2-2 record 
during the first month of the season to 
emerge as contenders for the Fox Valley 
Conference. They qualified for the 
playoffs by being one of the 192 high 
school teams with 6-3 records to score at 



least 35 points. "We knew we had a shot 
at being included in those teams, but until 
the results we in from all the Friday and 
Saturday games there was no way of 
knowing if we'd make it," said Kulkinski. 
"The kids are elated that they are going to 
a playoff game." 

The Bears have never won a playoff 
game but have played in two in recent 
years. They went down to Cary-Grove 21- 
6 in 1987 and to North Chicago 25-20 in 
1989. 

"We are going to focus on being 
consistent," said Kulkinski. "We want to 
limit turn-overs." 

If the Bears lose to Wauconda who went 
7-2 Wednesday, the time to contemplate 
next year will be upon them. A win 
Wednesday will advance them to the next 
round to meet the winner of the Round 
Lake/Cary-Grovc game on Wednesday. 

"I'm optimistic for next season," said 
Kulkinski. "We will lose some to 
graduation but the interior lineman are 
junioi^ and half of the defense is made up 
of juniors. We'll be bringing back a lot 
of experienced players. If they work hard 
in the summer we may do very well." 

Chances are next season, the Bears will 
comeout roaring. 






Lakatand Ut^iptip^n 49' 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



Sewer battle sparks municipal civil war 



by THOMAS STEVENS Mayor Paul Baumunk, who 

Lakeland Newspapers is preparing his village for 

Sept. 30, 1992 is a day the fight of its life, 

that will live in infamy, With the announcement 

according to Lindenhurst by Gov. Jim Edgar that 



Abbott Laboratories would 
build a huge site in 
Northern Lake County, 
between Antioch and 
Lindenhurst near the comer 



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Student vote 



Oakland Second-grader Ryan Schiller, .of Undenhurst, casts his ballot for hts 
favorite candidate In Tuesday's Presidential election. Oakland students 
elected President Bush with 241 votes. Bill Clinton received 135 votes, 
while Ross Perot garnered 65 votes, — Photo by Thonnas Stevens. 



of Rte. 173 and Rlc. 45, the 
situation between the two 
villages became adversarial 
alnnost instantly as both 
sides now try to control the 
open land outside of their 
present villages. 

Both villages will hav& 
plans in the Northeastern 
Illinois Planning 
Commission by Nov. 18, 
with a public hearing now 
set for Dec. 2 in Chicago. 
•This hearing could 
determine who controls the 
sewer facilities in the area 
of combat, which includes 
nearly 5,000 acres of open 
area along Rte. 173 near 
Rte. 45. 

The third combatant in 
this power struggle to 
control future growth and- 
development in one of the 
last untouched regions of 
the county is the county 
itself, who wishes to build 
a multi-million ' dollar 
scwer-trcatmcnt plant of 
their own along Rte. 45, 
just south of Rte. 173 to 
service their proposed 
Village of Old Mill Creek 
project, and any other futunC 
. commercial or residential 
building that occurs in the 
area. 



"Who ever controls the 
water and sewer in this 
region, will be able to 
annex future growth into 
their village," said 
Baumunk. "The community 
then benefits from water 
hook-up fees, sales tax 
revenues and • the 
municipality then controls 
what is going on their door 
step." 

However, . in the 
opinion of the other two 
sides, Lindenhurst docs not 
specifically have the rights 
to the area just because their 
$ 6.1 million sewer plant is 
already under construction. 

Antioch Mayor Robert 
Wilton, who has always 
been against growth near 
Antioch, believes that 
everyone involved should 
have enough room lo 
expand. 

"The situation changed 
when the Abbott 
announcement was made," 
said Wilton. "Growth in the 
area is going lo happen." 



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Recycle 



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PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 
Consolidating domestic subsidiaries of Ihe First National Bank of Antioch of Antioch in the 
state of Illinois, at the close of business on September 30, 1992 published in response to 
call made by Comptroller of the Currency, under title 12, United States Code, Section 161. 
Charter Number 12870-5321 Comptroller of the Currency Central District. 
Statement of Resources and LibilHies 

Thousands of Dollars , 
ASSETS 
Cash and balances due from depository Institutions: 

Noninterest-bearing balances and cunrency and coin 1 ,828 

Interest-bearing balances 

Securities 25,748 

Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 
Federal funds sold 1,037 

Securities purchased under agreements to resell 

Loans and lease financing receivables: 

Loans and leases, net of unearned Income 54,050 

LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 843 

LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 53,207 

Assets held in trading accounts 

Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 2,631 

Other real estate owned 

Investments In unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

Intangible assets ' 

Other assets 846 

TOTAL ASSETS 85,297 

Losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 1 823G) 

Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 1 823()) 85,297 

LIABILITIES 
Deposits; 

In domestic off Ices .• 78,153 

Noninterest-bearing 7,525 

Interest-bearing 70,628 

Federal funds purchased 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 

Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 830 

Other borrowed money , j 

Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized teases 

Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding ' 

Subordinated notes and debentures 

Other liabilities 754 

Total llabilites 79,737 

LImited-lrfe prefen'ed stock and related surplus 

EQUITY CAPITAL 
Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 

Common stock 537 

Surplus 1,897 

Undivided profits and capital reserves 3,126 

LESS: Net unrealized toss on marketable equity securities 

Total equity capital 5,560 

Losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 1 823(i) 

Total equity capital and losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) 5,560 

Total liabilities, limited-life preferred stock, equity capital, and losses 

defeired pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 1823{j) 85,297 

We, the undersigned directors, attest to the correctness of this statement of resources and 
liabilities. We declare that it has been examined by us, and to the best of our knowledge and 
belief has been prepared In conformance with the instructions and is true and correct. 
Ted C. Axton 
William W. Nauman 
Robert A. Schmidt 
Directors 

I, Louis Korom III, Senior Vice President/Cashier of the above-named bank do hereby 
declare that this Report of Condition is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and 
belief. 

Louis Korom III 

October 26, 1992 

Mary Ellen Paulus 

Notary Public 

My Comm. Exp. 3/1/95 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) 

1192A-167-AR 

• November 6, 1992 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIRCATE 
NAf\flE OF BUSINESS: 
Larry's Tax Sen/ices 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 21708 W. 
Elm St., Lake Villa, IL 60046 
NAME(S) AND POST OF- 
FICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Lawrence 
Leroy Stowell, 21708 W. Elm 
St., Lake Villa, IL 60046 
STATE OF ILUNOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE, •• 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(3) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are conBCt as shown. 
Lawrence Leroy Stowell 
October 23, 1992 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE. 88 

The foregoing instru- 
- ment was acknowledged 
before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to con- 
duct the business this 
October23,1992 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Deputy County Clerk 

My Comm. Exp. 12-1-94 

Received: Oct 23, 1992 

Linda lanuzt Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

1092E-155-LV 

October 30, 1992 

Novembers, 1992 

November 13, 1992 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Number: 10413 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domesllc and foreign subsidiaries 
and foreign branches ofState Bank of Anlioch located in Antioch, Illinois at the close of 
business September 30, 1992. Published in Response lo Call of the COMMISSIONER OF 
BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1 . Cash and balances due from depository institullons: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 5,436 

b. Interest-bearing balances 

2. Securities 74,924 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 

a. Federal funds sold 8,739 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned Income 124,218 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 1 ,392 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

d. Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 

(item 4,a minus 4.b and 4.c) 122,826 

5. Assets held In trading accounts ' 

6. Premises and fixed assets (Including capitalized leases) ■ 3,605 

7. Other real estate owned 107 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets 

11. Other assets 3,050 

12. a. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 11) 218,687 

b. Loss deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j)(from Schedule RC-M) 

c. Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 

LIABILrriES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 199,772 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 18,964 

(2) interest-bearing 180,808 

b. In foreign offices. Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and lBF*s 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing '0 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase; 

a. Federal funds purchased 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 625 

15. Demand notes Issued to the U.S. Treasury 

16. Other borrowed money 
• 17. Mortgage indebledness and obligations under capitalized leases 

18. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

1 9. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits 

20. Other liabilities 1.B0Q 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 202,197 

22. LImlted-IIfe preferred stock 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock . ' Q 

24. Common slock 993 

25. Surplus 11,507 

26. Undivided profits and capital reserves 3,990 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums of items 23 through 27) 16,490 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES, LIMITED-LIFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 

EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 21, 22, and 28) , 218,687 

I, Roger V. Manderscheld Exec. V.P., of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this 
report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief, 

Correct-AttesI: Roger V. Manderscheld 
Randolph S. Miles . 
Timothy H. Osmond 
Claude M. Smith 
Directors 

State of ILLINOIS, County of Lake, ss: Sworn to and subscribed balore me this 29th day 
of Oct, 1 992. My commission expires 8-27-1 995 

Donna M. Gelger, Notary Public 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) 

1192A-168-AR 

November 6, 1992 



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50 Lakofand Nowspapors 



i a c Jl .n J f' a M 3 3 II >f iM 7 



Friday, Novemb«r6, 1992 



— aCKKUIS..- 



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Creative 
individuals 
are needed 

The Northern Illinois 
Special Recreation Assoc, 
is seeking enthusiastic and 
creative individuals to share 
then: talents with children or 
adults with special needs. 

A training will be from 
7 to 9 p.m. on Nov. 5 at " 
the NISRA office, 240 
Commerce Dr., Unit A, 
Crystal Lake. Call Amy at 
(815)459-0737 for in- 
formation. 

NISRA programs in- 
clude crafts, drama, music, 
nature, games, sports, exer- 
cise, and community out- 
ings. NISRA serves the -res- 
idents of Barrington, Gary, 
Crystal Lake, Dundee 
Township, Harvard, Lake 
Zurich, Marengo, Wood- 
stock and Wauconda. 

Pro-Life meeting 
slated for Nov. 7 

A pro-life gathering will 
be held from 7 to 9 p.m., 
Nov. 7 at the Burlington 
Junior High School in 
Burlington. Special pre- 
sentations at the gathering 
will include individual and 
communal prayer, com- 
mitments to various local 
Respect for Life or- 
ganizations, and a showing 
of the 9-mlnule video "Hard 
■ Truth." 

The gathering is spon- 
sored by Southern Lakes 
Churches United for Life. 
For more information, call 
Herb Golschmidt Jr. at 
(414)763-4353. 




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envelope. Write 'coupon* in the Special InstucUons area. Good on C-41 process full I 
frarro color print film (3Smm, 1 10, 126 or disc). Not valid in conjunction with any | 
other offers. Coupon must accompany order. Offer valid: November 2-8. 1 992. j 

Photo Center ■ 

Where Great Things Develop \ 




214 W. WASHINGTON • ROUND LAKE • 546-3812 



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AT ACE HARDWARE HOME CENTER 

IN ROUND LAKE 

SATURDAY, NOV- 7TH 10-3PM 



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Come To Our Big 

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See the latest toys! Manufacturers will be present to answer aU of your questions. 

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Win one of many prwd being given 
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NO PURCHASE NECESSARY, WINNER NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WINl 

'^'^ ^^E^mR AT ACE HAM)WARE HOME CENTER IN ROUra 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



52 Lakeland N*w«pap«rs 



.j »-i i-i i. Ill I I' ■ II m 1 1 i. - U "i" ' v ii— J M 



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I 



GET "IT" OFF 

YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



LIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE T/yLK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 24) 

time, let's get a better candidate who has something 
upstairs and a record to prove it. 

Backward Town 

Thank you for Lipsevicc. I think it's one of the most 
unique things your paper has to allow the "little person" 
to be heard. I live in Wauconda and I cannot stand the 
small-town, backwards mentality of many of the town- 
folk. They don't like progress and they don't like change. 
If we were smart, we would progress, but with caution. 
A lot of these suburbs were stupid and built without 
realizing the position they were putting themselves in. 
We have the opportunity to be a model society. We have 
the chance to build and grow and give the town 
something to be proud of. Come on, Wauconda. Let's 
build and have something to show off. 

So Long, Beach! 

I'm from Round Lake Beach and have a gripe with the 
police deparuncnt. I live in a townhome and had several 
guests over for a birthday parly. Those guests included 
the parents of me and my husband. Wc called the police 
department and told them that we would have a car on 
the street for several hours. This is mandatory because 
there arc "No Parking" signs throughout our circular 
development. Wc gave the police the license plate 
number and were told that everything was OK. Well, 
one of the groups of parents moved their car and a 
different one ended up in the street So, what did the 
police do? Rather than checking at the door, since wc 




NOTICE 



An Invitation is extended to public 
bodies, otlorneys, businesses and private 
citizens to use Lal<eland Newspapers for 
convenient publication of LEGAL 
NOTICES required by tl^e state of Illinois. 

3 quicl< and. economical ways; 

• CALL Chris Kenyon 

(708)223-8161 

• FAX (708)223-8810 

• MAIL Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Graystal<e,!L 60030 

Deadline: Tuesday at 1 1 a.m. 
Published Thursday 

We're here to serve! 



BETTER HEALTH 

thru 
CHIROPRACTIC 





B^^s 


F 


^ 




m. ^^ 



had called in and said that a car would be in the street, 
the police officer gave my husband's parents a ticket. 
The police department knew wc had people at our house. 
The police department was called in advance. The police 
dcparUTient was notified, but we still got a ticket. Well, 
Round Lake Beach, we arc not a drain on society like 
some residents. "Wc are upstanding and law-abiding. And 
you know what? We're also leaving. You can forget our 
tax dollars. You can forget our business. If this is the 
way you treat your residents, giving out parking tickets 
rather than busting people who contaminate Halloween 
candy with pills, you can forget about us. We don't need 
your town, and by the looks of things, you are in need . 
of an attitude adjustment and some negative news . 
coverage to get your act straight. We've heard stories and 
we're going to all of the papers in Lake County. 

Canceled TCI 

TCI has su-uck again. Believe it or not, I'm canceling 
my cable and buying some "rabbit cars." Now I've got 
television and it never goes out. Good-bye, TCI. I'm 
glad I've got my television shows back for a lot less 
money. 

Bears Are History 

After watching the Bears lose on Monday night, I've 
decided to become a Minnesota fan. I'm tired of rooting 
for a loser. By the way, when docs basketball season 
start? I need a winning season from some team in ■ 
Illinois. 

Affordable Child Care 

We are new to the area and need affordable and quality 
child care. If anyone knows of such service, please call 
through Lipscrvice, we'd like to know. All of the places 
we've checked charge too much or appear to be filthy. Is 
there something affordable and clean? 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Dr. Robson 



DEALING WITH STRESS 



Many people today arc 
tired and fatigued due to 
our fast paced style of 
living. Sustained stress con 
often take its toll on our 
nervous system, often 
manifesting itself as 
nervousness, depression, 
lack of energy, and many 
other symptoms. If a 
person's nervous system is 
not able to handle the stress 
of living, many serious 
problems can then develop 



as a result. Your doctor of 
chiropractic works directly 
with llic nervous system by 
means of the spine and its 
nerves. He looks for possible 
areas of abnormal tension 
and strain which can often 
keep the nervous system 
from functioning at full 
efficiency. A healthy strong 
ncrvouj system is the most 
important way to dissipate 
life's daily stress. 



Robson Chiropractic 

41 E. Main St., Lake Zurich /1 90 OOOA 
n Lake Zurich Professional *iOO"^fcf^U 



41 E. Main St., Lake Zurich 
In Lake Zurich Professional 
Building next to j-ion's Park 



Proof? 



I just read "Devilish Halloween" in die Oct. 30 issue. 
Do you have any proof of these sacrifices? You said that 
we don't know what we're in for. Well, what arc wc in 
for? Lighten tip! 



Thanks For Bad Roads 

Hi, Lipservice, I'm from Lake' Zurich and I've got a 
connnnent to make. I'm glad that I live in a town where I 
can drive down the road- and thump over a pot hole 
whenever I want. I think it's great that the roads are in 
such poor condition. Why is diis great? Well, I figure it 
like this, A lot of people need jobs, right? Well, hire 
them and get them out here so they can fix our roads, 
dam it! 



Bugs Bunny In Heck 

This is in response lo "Devilish Halloween.". What 
planet did you come from? I've never heard such a 
ridiculous comment in my life. Honey, you had better 
get some professional help before it's loo late. Bugs 
Bunny is the "devil?" You're in trouble, honey. Get 
some help. • 

Thanks, Lakeland 

Hello, Lakeland. I'd like to commend you on your 
coverage of Liberty ville. I never saw your paper before 
last week, but I picked it up because there were no other 
papers. I'm glad to say that I enjoyed it and will 
continue lo pick up your paper in the future. The school 
news is very important to my family and you do a good 
job of covering iu I wish, however, you covered the 
board a little betier. I'd like to see what the board is 
planning to do before it does iL Thanks. 



"It was 2 a.m. and my daughter had a 
103' fever, I called ASK-A-NURSE." 



4C As a new mom, 1 need reassurance about the best way to care for my daughter. It's a relief 
to know that Saint Therese can lielp answer health care questions day or night. Thank you 
Saint Therese for this wonderful and much-needed sen'ice. W 

"Sue Basinger and her daughter of Lindenhurst 



^i 




Saint Therese Medical 
Center's ASK-A-NURSE is a 
free 24-hour health infor- 
mation and physician referral 
service. ASK-A-NURSE is 



_ -,_ _ _ ^11 B*^^^ Staffed by registered nurses 
/\5|\^/\^|^m\3 1 w^o ^''3 specially trained to 

help you find a physician, and 
provide health care 
information. 



244-5900 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



iti IS9Z, Saml Theroso Medical Centor 



A Division of Franciscan Sisters Ucalih Care Corporation 

2615 Washington Street 

Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

Tclcplione 708,249,3900 



Friday, Novombor 6, 1992 



Lakttland Newspaport 53 



■ i ■: _. ; I-,' / 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



with 



If you've always 
wanted to get into garden - 
ing or home landscaping 
but have never had a 
chance to learn some 
common gardening 
terms, brush up on the 
basics with this helpful tip 
sheet from the American 
Association of 
Nurserymen (AAN). 

Then, take a trip to 
your local garden center — 
the professionals there 
will answer questions and 
advise you on creating the 
garden or home land- 
scape of your dreams. 

•Balled, burped 
plants: These plants are 
grown in the ground. 
Their roots are dug in a 
soil ball and wrapped in 



burlap for shipping. 
Balled and buriapped 
plants include many de- 
ciduous trees and shrubs, 
conifers and broadleaf 
evergreens. 

•Compost: A rich gar- 
den fertilkor which can 
be purchased commer- 
cially or made at home. 
To make compost, com- 
bine layers of organic 
material, such as decayed 
leaves and vegetable 
scraps, alternated with 
layers of soil and a dusting 
of fertilizer, in a bin or a 
compost heap. 

•Integrated Pest 
Management (IPM): A 
new approach to pest 
control combining biolog- 
ical, organic and chemical 



methods. Often involves 
introducing a pest's natu- 
ral predators, selecting 
disease, Insect and 
drought-resistant plants 
and focusing on other 
preventive measures. " 

•Mulching: A method 
of preventing weeds, 
moderating soil tempera- 
tures and keeping soil 
moist. Involves covering 
gardens, shrubbery bor- 
ders and foundation 
plantings with a layer of 
wood chips, bark mulch, 
grass clippings,. chopped 
leaves, cocoa hulls or salt 
hay. 

•Native Plant: A plant 
growing naturally in your 
climate or in climatic 




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A Heavy-Duty 
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The Stihl Model 026 chain saw is the perfect choice for the pro- 
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Gary Adams, Owner & fvlqr 



HOURS: 



(708) 



conditions similar to the 
ones in which it is now 
planted. 

•Water-wise garden- 
ing: Designing a land- 
scape that conserves water 
by engaging in careful 
planning to minimize wa- 
ter usage. Easily achieved 
by selecting drought-tol- 
erant plants, establishing 
a set watering schedule 
and planting lower water- 
demand plants at higher 
elevations than nearby 
plants requiring more wa- 
ter. 

•Organic gardening: 
Plants grown without the 
use of chemical fertilizers 
or pesticides. Any fertiliz- 



ers used consist of animal 
or vegetable matter. 

•Pruning: Making 
small cuts with a pruning 
tool to remove damaged 
and dead branches. 
Pruning controls the size 
and shape of plants as 
they grow, spurs the pro- 
duction of fruits and 
flowers and eliminates 
dead or infected parts of 
plants. 

•Rootbound: A con- 
tainer-grown plant in 
which the roots have out- 
grown the container. In 
rootbound plants, the 
roots circle around the top 
of the rootball and poke 
out of the container's 
drain holes. 



•UDSDA plant hardi- 
ness zone map: A map 
splitting the United States ' 
into 11 zones to provide 
information on the ap- 
proximate minimum 
temperatures in each 
zone. A useful guide for 
selecting plants that will 
thrive in your area. 

•pH: A measure of the 
alkalinity or acidity of the 
soil winterizing. 

In this age of special- 
ized knowledge and ex- 
pert opinions, walking 
into your locad garden 
center without knowing 
some common gardening 
terms can be a bit intimi- 
dating. 



r^ 



JxighlaHd 






FALL SALE 

Nay\f In Progress 



AUSTRIAN r% _^^ -■ 

PINE ^ *or J. 

Free Installation On 2nd Pine 

Premium, Locally Grown, Great For 

Accent Planting And Screening. 



"We know our business, and it shows in 
everything we do" 



im 



OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 9 AM-5:00 PM 
SUNDAY 9 AM4:00 PM 



(708)546-5160 

Rte. 120 at Cedar Lake Road 
3MilesW.0fGrayslake 



VISA 



^-^i 



>5Skv 




54 Lakoland N«wspap9rs 



Friday, November 6, 1992 






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Lakeland 



Plants come a long way to find the|e home 



You may be surprised 
to know how much pro- 
fessional care your fa- 
vorite plant has received 
by the time it reaches 
your local garden center, 
says the American 
Association of 
Nurserymen (AAN). It may 
seem like healthy, 
colorful plants simply 
sprout at your favorite 
garden store, but in real- 
ity, they have come a long 
way to find a home there! 

Just as there is variety 
in the types of plants and 
trees you'll find at your 
garden center, there is 
variety in the way these 
plants have been devel- 
oped and cultivated. They 
do share one thing, how- 
ever, and that is the inor- 
dinate amount of time 
and care they have re - 
ceived from attentive 
nursery professionals na- 
tionwide. 

Many plants go 
through complex breed- 
ing and care before they 
come to the nursery, says 
AAN. For example, one 
professional landscape 
firm whicii raises orna- 
mental trees spends three 
to four years bringing 
these trees to market 

In the first year, the 
trees are plEuited in rows 
and staked. They then go 
through three to four 
years of weeding, irriga- 
tion, pest management, 
regular fertilizing, prun- 
ing and frequent inspec- 
tions for disease and in- 
sect problems. • 

After the trees have 
gone through this 
four -year process at the 
grower's site, they are fi- 
nally harvested and 
shipped to retail garden 
centers across the 
country. At the garden 
centers, the trees are often 
mulched to increase their 
ability to withstand late 
winter temperatures and 
chilly winds. They are 
then sold to customers in 
the spring, the product of 
four years of preparation 
that made them attractive 
for sale and for years to 
come. 

Other plants go 
through this long and 
complex nurturing phase 



before they reach the gar 
den center, says AAN. For 
example, it takes roughly 
five years for rhododen- 
drons to grow from a cut- 
ting at the grower's site 
into a thriving plant 
awaiting the consumer's 
purchase at the geuden 
center. 

In the first part of the 
rhododendron's life cy- 
cle, the grower takes a 
cutting, processes it and 
places it in the propaga- 
tion house for five to six 
months. In the propaga- 
tion house, the tempera- 
tures are carefully modu- 
lated, with a setting of 72 
degrees for the root sys- 
tem and 85 to 95 percent 
humidity overall. 

The rhododendrons 
are next ported in four 
and one quarter inch 
pots. They are sent into 
the growing area in the 
greenhouse where they 
stay for five to six months. 
In the greenhouse, the 
rhododendrons are fertil- 
ized weekly and pinched 
continuously so that they 
will grow into the most 
desirable, high-quality 
plants they can be. One 
grower has two employ- 
ees who do nothing at all 
except for care for the 
rhododendrons while 
they are in this stage. 

At the age of one year, 
the rhododendrons are 
planted in fields. They 
remain there for two and 
a half to four years. Dur- 
ing this period, they are 
fertilized, irrigated and 
monitored for insects and 
diseases. 

. Finally, the grower 
hand digs, balls and 
buriaps the rhododen- 
dron, and they make their 
way into the hands of ea- 
ger gardeners who want 
to carry on this lahor of 
love. 

Roses are another In- 
teresting exarhple of the 
time, money and atten- 
tion which retail garden 
centers, and other mem- 
bers of the nursery indus- 
try, lavish upon the plants 
they receive and produce. 
Roses come to the gar- 
den center gently packed 
on shelves in large, re- 
frigerated trucks. As the 



roses are. transported 
from the grower's site to 
the garden center, the 
temperatures in the truck 
are carefully maintained 
at 55 degrees. This pro- 
tects the roses and helps 
prevent damage. 

The retail garden 
centers places the rose di- 
rectly into the sales yard. 
The roses are then ar- 
ranged' in alphabetical 
order so that customers 
can find the flowers they 
are looking for. The roses 
are sorted, Irrigated and 
fed. Most roses live in the 
garden center for approxi 
mately six weeks, pam- 
pered from the moment 
they come in the door. 
According to AAN, 
some plants, such as hy- 
brid flowers, have been in 
the making literally for 
years. One multinational 
seed company, which 
propagates many of the 
flowers you see in your lo- 
cal garden centers, has re- 
search stations, research 
centers and breeding 
centers scattered across 
the world. 

The company spends 
years developing seeds 
for a variety of flowers. It 
specializes in creating 
new flower varieties 
called F-1 hybrids. Hy-r 
brids come from two un- 
like parent flowers which 
are IJred to incorporate 
the best characteristics of 
each parent. Trained 
breeders with years of ex- 
perience select the parent 
lines that will be 
cross -pollinated. 

After the breeders se- 
lect the parents, through 
a process of trial and error 
and a reliance on the sci- 
ence of genetics, they suc- 
cessfully create the F-1 
hybrids. Flowers are 
grown from the F-1 
hybrid seeds every ye?ir in 
what those in the nursery 
industry call "plant 
trials." 

Plant trials involve 
growing the seeds both in 
containers and in the 
field. Engaging in plant 
trials enables the seed 
company to determine if 
the new flower meets the 
desired oblectives. 

For example, a partic- 



Schwiildl 




Fall Holland Bulbs 

Plant these bulbs now and in the 

spring you'll have beautiful tulips, 

hyacinths, daffodils & crocus! 

See Schwind for Gift Ideas... 
Bird Baths, Lawn Statuary & More! 



Our Holiday Florals Are On Their Way! 



Come In 8i Browse Thru The Greenhouse! 



ular F-1 hybrid may be 
created to Incorporate the 
hardiness of one parent 
and the colorful blooms 
of another! If the plan tri- 
als don't yield a strong 
and colorM plant, the 
seed company goes back 
to the drawing board and 
creates a hybrid which 
demonstrates these traits. 
According to AAN, this 
lengthy and expensive 
testing process insures 
that consumer will ulti- 
mately purchase a 
healthy, well-bred plant 

After the seed com- 
pany is sure that the seeds 
meet the company's 
standards, the seeds are 
put into trial production. 
If the trial production 
phase yields flowers with 



the appropriate 
characteristics, the flower 
is pronounced a success. 

The flower then goes 
into major production, 
which involves growing 
the two distinctly differ- 
ent parent flowers. The 
parents are pollinated by 
hand as they flower. The 
seed capsules are picked 
and the hybrid seeds are 
packaged and shipped to 
the growing 
headquarters. 

The grower then sub- 
jects the seeds to a quality 
control process, removing 
samples form each lot 
Germination is 
inspected, and these 
samples are grown to fiill 
bloom to verify that the 
seed is true to type. After 



testing, the seeds are 
packaged and shipped to 
wholesale distributors. 
Wholesale distributors 
sell the seed to growers 
who, in turn, seU the 
flower to nurseries and 
retail garden centers. 

By the time the con- 
sumer comes into the 
picture, the hybrid 
flowers have been 
checked and rechecked, 
and gardeners can be 
sure they're buying a 
plant which will bloom 
exactly as they expect it's 
exciting to know that the 
plants and flowers you 
buy will benefit from the 
careful handling they 
have received for the past 
several years. 




Environmental benefits of trees: A primer 



Test your environmen- 
tal awareness by taking 
the following quiz. 

Q: Which of the fol- 
lowing environmental 
benefits are provided by 
trees? 

a. diminished rainfall 
runolff, reduced soil ero- 
sion and a decrease In 
pollution In streams and 
rivers 

b. cleaner air with less 
carbon dioxide 

c. lower home energy 
bflls 

d. Increased shelter 
for wildlife 

3. all of the above 



A: "e"— all of the 
above. Trees do more 
than lend beauty and sta- 
bility to the landscape. 
They also anchor the soil, 
contributing substantially 
to controlling water pol- 
lution. Trees improve our 
air quality, and they also 
act as nature's insulation, 
providing shade for 
homes in the summer and 
shelter from harsh winds 
in the winter. 

Trees provide food 
and valuaisle nesting ar- 
eas for a range of vidldlife, 
and make our world a 



richer and more vibrant 
place. 

If you selected "e" 
you're well aware of the 
many beneficial roles 
trees play in our environ- 
ment If you selected "a," 
"b," "c," or "d," you're not 
alone — many people are 
surprised by how impor- 
tant trees are to our overaU 
well-being. The next time 
you wonder what you can 
do to benefit the envi- 
ronment, consider plant- 
ing a tree, and remember 
the many ways trees 
strengthen and beautify 
our world. 






TTND OF 6EA60N m 

1-1 Everything Must Go. 

'Squash 'Onions 'Tomaloes •Potatoes 'Peppers •Cabbage 



a U 



Re-Opening For The Christmas Season 
Nov. 27th - Trees - Wreaths • Poinsettias 



Hours: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m., 7 days a week 
We reserve the right to limit quantity. Prices In effect while quantities last 

Located 1 1/2 mi. North of Lake Cook Rd. on U.S. 12 



438-4440 



Friday, November 6, 1992 



Lok^nd Newspaperi 55 



1992 













REDIT 



APPROVED 



I' 




ANKRUPTCY ■ APPHOVED 

-APPROVED 
APPROVED 
APPROVED 

MEDICAL BILLS ->f/'/'Mf/7 

WISCONSIN RESIDENTS 
APPROVED TOO 



WPAY 
DIVORCE 



Larry Doyle believes most |»eo|)le 
with bad credit are not bad peo|»le, 
but good |»eo|)le who have had bad 
luck. If this sounds like you, here 
is your second chance, grab it! 





























^ 



/a/t^ 



^COUNTRY 






ORS^ 



NICE 
NICE PEOPLE 



RT. 12, FOX LAKE 



56 Lak«(an^ Umwspapon 















Friday, Novembor 6, 1992